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COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN

AFFAIRS

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For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office

Washington, D.C. 20402

iFG
1943
Vol.14

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

CLEMENT J. ZABLOCKI, Wisconsin, Chairman L. H. FOUNTAIN, North Carolina

WILLIAM S. BROOMFIELD, Michigan
DANTE B. FASCELL, Florida

EDWARD J. DERWINSKI, Illinois
BENJAMIN S. ROSENTHAL, New York PAUL FINDLEY, Illinois
LEE H. HAMILTON, Indiana

JOHN H. BUCHANAN, JR., Alabama
LESTER L. WOLFF, New York

LARRY WINN, JR., Kansas JONATHAN B. BINGHAM, New York BENJAMIN A. GILMAN, New York GUS YATRON, Pennsylvania

TENNYSON GUYER, Ohio CARDISS COLLINS, Illinois

ROBERT J. LAGOMARSINO, California STEPHEN J. SOLARZ, New York

WILLIAM F. GOODLING, Pennsylvania DON BONKER, Washington

JOEL PRITCHARD, Washington GERRY E. STUDDS, Massachusetts

MILLICENT FENWICK, New Jersey
ANDY IRELAND, Florida

DAN QUAYLE, Indiana
DONALD J. PEASE, Ohio
DAN MICA, Florida
MICHAEL D. BARNES, Maryland
WILLIAM H. GRAY III, Pennsylvania
TONY P. HALL, Ohio
HOWARD WOLPE, Michigan
DAVID R. BOWEN, Mississippi
FLOYD J. FITHIAN, Indiana
BERKLEY BEDELL, IOWA

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Foreword

This is the 14th in a series of volumes based on transcripts of hearings in executive sessions of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs during the period beginning in 1943 and dealing with subjects of historical interest. The first eight volumes in this series covered the period 1943-50. The 10 succeeding volumes, of which this is the 6th, will carry the series through 1956.

In this volume, the committee presents hearings during the 82d and 83d Congresses (1953-56) which dealt with questions of that period associated with the East-West confrontation known as the cold war. The hearings selected are those which throw light on U.S. policy as it reflects Executive, congressional, and popular feelings at the time on cold war problems in such areas as propaganda, information, economic matters, and the relative military strength of the East and West blocs. Tensions between East and West were also associated during this period with two key regions: Europe and the Far East. They may be discerned in the hearings printed in volume XV of this historical series (European Problems) and in volumes XVII and XVIII (United States Policy in the Far East).

The East-West confrontation may also be considered the underlying theme-although complicated by many other political, economic, and military considerations-of the volumes in this series which trace the development of the mutual security program over the years 1951-56. Through the yearly legislative packages in this program, Congress influenced American allocation of largescale financial and military resources to strengthen U.S. allies and other areas considered important to our Nation's security. As I indicated in the foreword to the first in this group of volumes, the principal factor here was a feeling that the expansion of communism represented a threat to the free world and the security of

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