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$$ 6585-6589. See § 6584.

§ 6589a. What days deemed holidays in postal service.--Hereafter all days, other than the holidays enumerated in the Act of July 28, 1916, making appropriations for the Postal Service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1917, set aside by the President of the United States as holidays to be observed by the other departments of the Government throughout the United States shall be construed as applicable to the Postal Service in the same manner and to the same extent as the executive departments. (Act Feb. 28, 1919, c. 69, § 1.)

Note.—The statute so referred to is $ 6587.

§ 6593. Leaves of absence for employees.—Employees in the Postal Service shall be granted fifteen days' leave of absence with pay, exclusive of Sundays and holidays, each fiscal year, and sick leave with pay at the rate of ten days a year to be cumulative for a period of three years, but no sick leave with pay in excess of thirty days shall be granted during any three consecutive years. Sick leave shall be granted only upon satisfactory evidence of illness and if more than two days the application therefor shall be accompanied by a physician's certificate.

The fifteen days' leave shall be credited at the rate of one and onequarter days for each month of actual service.

Whenever an employee herein provided for shall have been reduced in salary for any cause, he may be restored to his former grade or advanced to an intermediate grade at the beginning of any quarter following the reduction, and a restoration to a former grade or advancement to an intermediate grade shall not be construed as a promotion within the meaning of the law prohibiting advancement of more than one grade within one year. (Acts Oct. 1, 1890, c. 1260, 26 Stat. 648; May 27, 1908, c. 206, 35 Stat. 413; Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, 37 Stat. 546; June 5, 1920, c. 254.)

§ 6594. See § 6593.

§ 6595. Superseded by $ 6593.

§ 6612. Cancelling machines and equipages for city delivery and collection service.

Note.-Act Feb. 28, 19 c. 69, § I., making appropriations for these purposes, provides that the Postmaster General may expend a part of the same in leasing quarters for automobiles and in the erection and equipment of a garage for such vehicles in the District of Columbia.

$ 6615. Sale of maps.—The Postmaster General may authorize the sale to the public of post-route maps and rural-delivery maps or blue prints at the cost of printing and 10 per cent. thereof added, the proceeds of such sale to be used as a further appropriation for the preparation and publication of post-route maps and rural-delivery maps or blue prints. (Acts July 28, 1916, c. 261, § 1, 39 Stat. 422; March 3, 1917, c. 162, § 1, 39 Stat. 1067; July 2, 1918, c. 117, 1, 40 Stat.; Feb. 28, 1919, c. 69, § 1; March 1, 1921, c. 88, § 1, 41 Stat. 1154.)

§ 6624. Buildings leased for post office purposes.

Note.The term of such leases is extended to twenty years, by Act April 24, 1920. c. 161, § 1, which also repealed the provision of this section that there shall not be allowed for the use of any third class post office for rent a sum in excess of $500, nor more than $100 for fuel and light, in any one year.

CHAPTER 2.

CARRIERS, BRANCH OFFICES, AND RECEIVING-BOXES.

§ 6635a. Branch offices and stations in Hawaii, Porto Rico and Virgin Islands.—The Postmaster General is hereby directed to establish in the Islands of Hawaii, in Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands under appropriate regulations to be prescribed by him, such branch offices, ronaccounting offices, or station of Honolulu, San Juan, and Charlotte Amalie, respectively, as in his judgment may be necessary to improve the service and as may be required for the convenience of the public: Provided, however, That such branches, nonaccounting offices, and stations shall be conducted under the name of the existing post offices affected so as to maintain the identity of the officers concerned: Provided, That the Postmaster General be authorized to fix the salary of the postmaster at Honolulu at not to exceed $4,000 per annum. (Act Oct. 28, 1919, c. 86, § 1.)

§ 6653. Record of length of rural route.-Hereafter the pay of rural carriers and substitute rural carriers, which depends upon the length of the route, shall be determined in accordance with the records of the Post Oifice Department, which records shall be promptly corrected whenever the Postmaster General determines that such records are not correct. (Act April 24, 1920, c. 161, § 1.)

Note.--See $ 6593.

§ 6654. Compensation of rural letter carriers. The compensation of each rural carrier for serving a rural route of twenty-four miles, six days in the week, shall be $1,800; on routes twenty-two miles and less than twentyfour miles, $1,728; on routes twenty miles and less than twenty-two miles, $1,620; on routes eighteen miles and less than twenty miles, $1,440; on routes sixteen miles and less than eighteen miics, $1,260; on routes fourteen miles and less than sixteen miles, $1,080; on routes twelve miles and less than fourteen miles, $1,008; on routes ten miles and less than twelve miles, $936; on routes eight miles and less than ten miles, $864; on routes six miles and less than eight miles, $792; on routes four miles and less than six miles, $720. A rural letter carrier serving one triweekly route shall be paid on the basis for a route one-half the length of the route served by him, and a carrier serving two triweekly routes shall be paid on the basis for a route one-half of the combined length of the two routes. Each rural carrier assigned to a horse-drawn vehicle route on which daily service is performed shall receive $30 per mile per annum for each mile said route is in excess of twenty-four miles or major fraction thereof, based on actual mileage, and each rural carrier assigned to a horse-drawn vehicle route on which triweekly service is performed shall receive $15 per mile for each mile said route is in excess of twenty-four miles or major fraction thereof, based on actual mileage.

Deductions for failure to perform service on a standard rural delivery route for twenty-four miles and less shall not exceed the rate of pay per mile for service for twenty-four miles and less; and deductions for failure to perform service on mileage in excess of twenty-four miles shall not exceed the rate of compensation allowed for such excess mileage.

The pay of a carrier who furnishes and maintains his own motor vehicle and who serves a route not less than fifty miles in length be at not exceeding $2,600 per annum.

The pay of carriers in the village delivery service, under such rules and regulations as the Postmaster General may prescribe, shall be from $1,000 to $1,200 per annum. (Res. March 4, 1915, No. 15, 38 Stat. 1227; Acts July 2, 1918, c. 117. $S 1, 2; Feb. 28, 1919, c. 69, SS 1, 2; Nov. 7, 1919, c. 99. $8 1-4; June 5, 1920, c. 254.)

§ 6657. Lake Winnepesaukee carrier.

Note.-Act Feb. 28 1919, c. 69, § 1, provides that such carrier from Laccnia, New Hampshire, who furnishes his own equipment, shall receive compensation of $1,800 per annum.

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§ 6659a. Experimental operation of motor vehicle truck routes, and country motor express routes.—To promote the conservation of food products and to facilitate the collection and delivery thereof from producer to consumer and the delivery to producers of articles necessary in the production of such food products, the Postmaster General is hereby authorized to conduct experiments in the operation of motor vehicle truck routes, to be selected by him. The Postmaster General is further authorized to conduct experiments in the operation of country motor express routes, which shall be primarily operated as a means of expediting the transportation of fourth-class mail between producing and consuming localities and shall not displace or supplant any existing methods of mail transportation or delivery. These two classes of experiments shall be conducted under such rules and regulations, including modifications in rates of postage and in packing and wrapping requirements as the Postmaster General may prescribe, and to defray the cost thereof the sum of $300,000 is hereby appro. priated: Provided, That mail other than that of the fourth class shall not be dispatched on experimental motor vehicle truck routes or on experimental country motor express routes unless the same can be expedited thereby in delivery at destination: Provided further, That separate accounts shall be kept of the amount of all the mail of all classess carried on such routes. The Postmaster General shall report to Congress the result of such experiments at the beginning of the next regular session. (Act Feb. 28, 1919, c. 69, § 1.)

CHAPTER 3.

MAIL MATTER. § 6702a. Indemnity claims on insured and collect-on-delivery mail.Hereafter the Postmaster General may, under such rules and regulations as he shall prescribe, authorize postmasters to pay limited indemnity claims on insured and collect-on-delivery mail. (Act April 24, 1920, c. 161, § 1.)

§ 6703a. Receipt for special-delivery mail.—The Postmaster General may, under such rulcs and regulations as he shall prescribe, deliver specialdelivery matter without obtaining a receipt therefor. (Acts April 24, 1920, c. 161, § 1; March 1, 1921, c. 88, § 1, 41 Stat. 1152.)

CHAPTER 4.

POSTAGE. § 6711a. Prepayment on first-class matter without affixing stamps.The Postmaster General, under such regulations as he may prescribe for the collection of such postage, is hereby authorized to accept for delivery and deliver, without postage stamps affixed thereto, mail matter of the first class on which the postage has been fully prepaid at the rate provided by law. (Act April 24, 1920, c. 161, $ 5.)

§ 6734. Free transmission of census mail; private use of envelopes.--All mail matter, of whatever class or weight, relating to the census and addressed to the Census Office, or to any official thereof, and indorsed "Official business, Census Office," shall be transmitted free of postage, and by registered mail if necessary, and so marked: Provided, That if any

person shall make use of such indorsement to avoid the payment of postage or registry fee on his or her private letter, package, or other matter in the mail, the person so offending shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and subject to a fine of $300, to be prosecuted in any court of competent jurisdiction. (Acts July 2, 1909, c. 2, § 29, 36 Stat. 10; March 3, 1919, c. 97, § 29.)

CHAPTER 7.

UNCLAIMED MATTER AND REQUEST LETTERS. § 6776. Return of undelivered letters.—The Postmaster General may regulate the period during which undelivered letters shall remain in any post office and when they shall be returned to the dead-letter office; and he may make regulations for their return from the dead-letter office to the writers when they can not be delivered to the parties addressed: Provided, That when letters are returned from the dead-letter office to the writers, a fee of 3 cents shall be collected at the time of delivery, under such rules and regulations as the Postmaster General may prescribe. (R. S. § 3936; Acts July 8, 1872, c. 335, § 194, 17 Stat. 308; April 24, 1920, c. 161, § 4.)

§ 6781a. Forwarding or return of second, third and fourth class matter. -Hereafter, under such regulations as the Postmaster General may prescribe, fourth-class matter of obvious value which is of perishable nature may be forwarded to the addressee at another post office charged with the amount of the forwarding postage, and when such matter of a perishable nature is undeliverable to the addressee it may be returned to the sender charged with the return postage: Provided, That other undeliverable matter of the second, third, and fourth classes may be forwarded to the addressee or to such other person as the sender may direct, at another post office, charged with the amount of the forwarding postage, or it may be returned to the sender charged with the return postage, when it bears the sender's pledge that the postage for forwarding and return will be paid, such postage to be collected on delivery: Provided further, That when the sender refuses to furnish such postage in accordance with his pledge, the acceptance from him of further matter bearing such pledge may be refused. (Act Nov. 19, 1919, c. 119, § 1.)

CHAPTER 8.

CONTRACTS FOR CARRYING MAILS.

8 6790a. Emergency mail service in Alaska.–For inland transportation by star routes in Alaska, $255,000: Provided, That out of this appropriation the Postmaster General is authorized to provide for difficult or emergency mail service in Alaska, including the establishment and equipment of relay stations, in such manner as he may think advisable, without advertising therefor. (Act Feb. 28, 1919, c. 69, § 1.)

$ 6814. Aeroplane mail service.—The Postmaster General is authorized to expend not exceeding $850,500 for the purchase of aerop nes and the operation and maintenance of aeroplane mail service between such points, including service to and between points in Alaska, as he may determine. The Postmaster General in exnending this appropriation shall purchase, as far as practicable. such available and suitable equipment and supplies for the areoplane mail service as may be owned by or under construction for the War Department or the Navy Department when no longer required because of the cessation of war activities, and it shall be his duty to first ascertain if such articles of the character described may be secured from the War Department or the Navy Department before purchasing such

equipment or supplies elsewhere. If such equipment or supplies, other than emergency supplies, are purchased elsewhere than from the War Department or the Navy Department, the Postmaster General shall report such action to Congress, together with the reasons for such purchases. All articles purchased from either of said departments shall be paid for at a reasonable price considering wear and tear and general condition. Said departments are authorized to sell such equipment and supplies to the Post Office Department under the conditions specified, and the proceeds of such sales shall be covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts: Provided further, That the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy are hereby authorized and directed to deliver immediately to the Postmaster General, as he may request, and as hereinbefore provided, such aeroplane machines, supplies, equipment, and parts as may be serviceable and available for the aeroplane mail service, the same to be out of any equipment that the War Department or the Navy Department has on hand or under construction, the War Department and the Navy Department appropriations to be credited with the equipment turned over to the Post Office Department: And provided further, That separate accounts be kept of the amount expended for aeroplane mail service. (Acts March 3, 1917, c. 162, § 1, 39 Stat. 1064; July 2, 1918, c. 117, § 1, 40 Stat.; Feb. 28, 1919, c. 69, § 1.)

§ 6814a. Contracts for carriage of mail by aeroplane.—The Postmaster General may contract with any individual, firm, or corporation for an aeroplane mail service between such points as he may deem advisable and designate, in case such service is furnished at a cost not greater than the cost of the same service by rail, and shall pay therefor out of the appropriation for inland transportation by railroad routes. (Acts April 24, 1920, c. 161, § 1; March 1, 1921, c. 88, § 1, 41 Stat. 1152.)

Note.-Act June 5, 1920, c. 253, provides that the "Postmaster General is authorized to sell under such rules and regulations as he may prescribe any aeroplanes, parts thereof, field equipment, tools and other aviation material which have become unsuitable in the postal service or which will de. teriorate and become unsuitable before it can be used. The proceeds of such sales shall be covered into the Treasury as Miscellaneous receipts.'

§ 6814b. Use in postal service of war-time aeroplanes and motor vehicles.—The Secretary of War is authorized hereafter, in his discretion, to deliver and turn over to the Postmaster General, without charge therefor, from time to time, such motor vehicles, aeroplanes, and parts thereof, and machinery and tools to repair and maintain the same, as may be suitable for use in the Postal Service; and the Postmaster General is authorized to use the same in the transportation of the mails and to pay the necessary expenses thereof, including the replacement, maintenance, exchange, and repair of such equipment, out of any appropriation available for the service in which such vehicles or aeroplanes are used. (Act April 24, 1920, c. 161, $ 3.)

§ 6815. Carriage of mail by electric and cable cars.-For inland transportation of mail by electric and cable cars, $545,000: Provided, That the rate of compensation to be paid per mile shall not exceed the rate now paid to companies performing such service, except that the Postmaster General, in cases where the quantity of mail is large ajad the number of exchange points numerous, may, in his discretion, authorize payment for closedpouch service at a rate per mile not to exceed one-third above the rate per mile now paid for closed-pouch service; and for mail cars and apartments carrying the mails, not to exceed the rate of 1 cent per linear foot per carmile of travel: Provided further, That the rates for electric car service on routes over twenty miles in length outside of cities shall not exceed the rates paid for service on steam railroads: Provided, however, That not to exceed $25,000 of the sum hereby appropriated may be expended, in the discretion of the Postmaster General, where unusual conditions exist or

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