The Life of Thomas Arnold

Front Cover
Strahan, 1870 - 280 pages
 

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Page 95 - And be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess; but be filled with the Spirit...
Page 183 - If ye endure chastening, God dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is he whom the father chasteneth not ? But if ye be without chastisement, whereof all are partakers, then are ye bastards, and not sons.
Page 67 - The true sort of captain too for a boys' army, one who had no misgivings and gave no uncertain word of command, and, let who would yield or make truce, would fight the fight out (so every boy felt) to the last gasp and the last drop of blood. Other sides of his character might take hold of and influence boys here and there, but it was this thoroughness and undaunted courage which more than anything else won his way to the hearts of the great mass of those on whom he left his mark, and made them believe...
Page 67 - ... with all his heart and soul and strength striving against whatever was mean and unmanly and unrighteous in our little world. It was not the cold clear voice of one giving advice and warning from serene heights, to those who were struggling and sinning below, but the warm living voice of one who was fighting for us and by our sides, and calling on us to help him and ourselves and one another.
Page 190 - Thomas, because thou hast seen thou hast believed ; blessed are they who have not seen, and yet have believed...
Page 33 - Arnold's great power as a private tutor resided in this, that he gave such an intense earnestness to life. Every pupil was made to feel that there was a work for him to do— that his happiness as well as his duty lay in doing that work well. Hence an indescribable zest was communicated to a young man's feeling about life ; a strange joy came over him on discovering that he had the means of being useful, and thus of being happy ; and a deep respect and ardent attachment sprang up towards him who...
Page 34 - In the details of daily business, the quantity of time that he devoted to his pupils was very remarkable ; lessons began at seven, and, with the interval of breakfast, lasted till nearly three ; then he would walk with his pupils, and dine at half-past five. At seven, he usually had some lesson on hand, and it was only when we...
Page 94 - There is nothing so revolutionary, because there is nothing so unnatural and so convulsive to society, as the strain to keep things fixed, when all the world is, by the very law of its creation, in eternal progress...
Page 104 - Edgeworth's books, — as it is to fill our pages with Hebraisms, and to write and speak in the words and style of the Bible. The slightest touches of Christian principle and Christian hope in the Society's biographical and historical articles would be a sort of living salt to the whole; — and would exhibit that union which I never will consent to think unattainable, between goodness and wisdom; — between everything that is manly, sensible, and free, and everything that is pure and self-denying,...

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