Einstein on Peace

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Pickle Partners Publishing, Apr 7, 2017 - History - 638 pages
“Einstein was not only the ablest man of science of his generation, he was also a wise man, which is something different. If statesmen had listened to him, the course of human events would have been less disastrous than it has been.”

This verdict, from the Preface by Bertrand Russell, sums up the importance of this first collection of Albert Einstein’s writings on war, peace, and the atom bomb. In this volume, thanks to the Estate of Albert Einstein, the complete story is told of how one of the greatest minds of modern times worked from 1914 until 1955 on the problem of peace. It is a fascinating record of a man’s courage, his sincerity, and his concern for those who survive him.

This book is also a history of the peace movement in modern times. Here are letters to and from some of the most famous men of his generation, including the correspondence between Einstein and Sigmund Freud on aggression and war, and the true story of his famous letter to President Roosevelt reporting the theoretical possibility of nuclear fission. It is the living record of more than forty years of Einstein’s untiring struggle to mobilize forces all over the world for the abolition of war and the creation of a supranational organization to solve conflicts among nations.

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
PREFACE 11
HOPE
CHAPTER THREEINTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
CHAPTER FOURWAR RESISTANCE I 19281931 78
CHAPTER FIVEWAR RESISTANCE II 19311932 106
CHAPTER SIXTHE EVE OF FASCISM IN GERMANY
CHAPTER SEVENADVENT OF NAZISM AND ADVOCACY
CHAPTER EIGHTARRIVAL IN AMERICA
188
CHAPTER NINEBIRTH OF THE ATOMIC AGE 1939
CHAPTER TENTHE SECOND WORLD WAR 19391945
236

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About the author (2017)

ALBERT EINSTEIN (14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist.

He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). Einstein’s work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known in popular culture for his mass-energy equivalence formula E = mc2. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his “services to theoretical physics”, in particular his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory.

Einstein published more than 300 scientific papers along with over 150 non-scientific works.

Together with the British philosopher Bertrand Russell, Einstein signed the Russell-Einstein Manifesto, which highlighted the danger of nuclear weapons. Einstein was affiliated with the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, until his death in 1955.

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