Establish the Composition of the United States Navy: Hearings Before the Committee on Naval Affairs, House of Representatives, Seventy-fifth Congress, Third Session, on H.R. 9218, to Establish the Composition of the United States Navy, to Authorize the Construction of Certain Naval Vessels, and for Other Purposes. January 31, February 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, and 28, 1938

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1938 - 953 pages

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Page 2248 - Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens,) the jealousy of a free people ought to be CONSTANTLY awake; since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government.
Page 2051 - This difference proceeds from that which exists in their respective governments. And to the defense of our own, which has been achieved by the loss of so much blood and treasure, and matured by the wisdom of their most enlightened citizens, and under which we have enjoyed unexampled felicity, this whole nation is devoted.
Page 2248 - Why forego the advantages of so peculiar a situation ? Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground ? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European ambition, rivalship, interest, humor, or caprice?
Page 2024 - It seems to be unfortunately true that the epidemic of world lawlessness is spreading. When an epidemic of physical disease starts to spread, the community approves and joins in a quarantine of the patients in order to protect the health of the community against the spread of the disease.
Page 2024 - Most important of all, the will for peace on the part of peaceloving nations must express itself to the end that nations that may be tempted to violate their agreements and the rights of others will desist from such a cause. There must be positive endeavors to preserve peace. America hates war. America hopes for peace. Therefore, America actively engages in the search for peace.
Page 2050 - With the movements in this hemisphere, we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes w^hich must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the Allied Powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America.
Page 2026 - War is a contagion, whether it be declared or undeclared. It can engulf states and peoples remote from the original scene of hostilities.
Page 2248 - The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements, let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here let us stop. Europe has a set of primary interests which to us have none or a very remote relation. Hence, she must be engaged in frequent controversies, the causes of which are essentially foreign to our concerns. Hence, therefore, it...
Page 2050 - It was stated at the commencement of the last session that a great effort was then making in Spain and Portugal to improve the condition of the people of those countries, and that it appeared to be conducted with extraordinary moderation. It need scarcely be remarked that the result has been so far very different from what was then anticipated. Of events in that quarter of the globe, with which we have so much intercourse and from which we derive our origin, we have always been anxious and interested...
Page 2331 - Absolute freedom of navigation upon the seas, outside territorial waters, alike in peace and in war, except as the seas may be closed in whole or in part by international action for the enforcement of international covenants.

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