Tomlin's Help to self-educators

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Page 47 - THERE IS ONE SORT of labour which adds to the value of the subject upon which it is bestowed: there is another which has no such effect.
Page 47 - The sovereign, for example, with all the officers botb. of justice and war who serve under him, the whole army and navy, are unproductive labourers. They are the servants of the public, and are maintained by a part of the annual produce of the industry of other people.
Page 6 - At her feet he bowed he fell, he lay down at her feet he bowed, he fell where he bowed, there he fell down dead...
Page 47 - The labour of the latter, however, has its value, and deserves its reward as well as that of the former. But the labour of the manufacturer fixes and realizes itself in some particular subject or vendible commodity, which lasts for some time at least after that labour is past. It is, as it were, a certain quantity of labour stocked and stored up to be employed, if necessary, upon some other occasion.
Page 6 - The mother of Sisera looked out at a window and cried through the lattice Why is his chariot so long in coming? why tarry the wheels of his chariots?
Page 7 - Yet Michael the archangel, when contending with the devil, he disputed about the body of Moses, durst not bring against hirn a railing accusation, but said, The Lord rebuke thee.
Page 20 - Researches into the Ecclesiastical \and Political state of Ancient Britain under the Roman Emperors.
Page 47 - The labour of the menial servant, on the contrary, does not fix or realize itself in any particular subject or vendible commodity. His services generally perish in the very instant of their performance, and seldom leave any trace or value behind them for which an equal quantity of service could afterwards be procured.
Page 5 - And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night: and the evening and the morning were the first day.
Page 23 - Camden says, the ihanes were only dignified by the offices which they bore. Their origin is referred to Canute. (See Sword.) A freeman, not noble, was raised to the rank of a thane by acquiring a certain portion of land, by making three voyages at sea, or by receiving holy orders. (See the article Great...

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