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Mr. Cannon. The gentleman from Pennsylvania. Mr. Fenton. Congressman Flood, you have stated that 12 men lost their lives.

Mr. FLOOD. Yes, Dr. Fenton. Mr. FENTON. It would be important for the committee to know that those 12 bodies are still there. They have never recovered the bodies.

Mr. Flood. Probably never will, Doctor.

Mr. FENTON. They have that condition all through the anthracite area. I do not know under whose jurisdiction this will come.

Mr. Flood. It should be the Engineers now. It is a flood problem and no longer a mining problem. Mr. FENTON. There have been some underground studies made. Mr. FLOOD. All of that information will be used. By the way, the State of Pennsylvania has spent $3 million on this problem with no Federal help at all.

Mr. CANNON. I can understand your anxiety with this difficult problem.

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 1960.

FLOOD CONTROL AND OTHER PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS IN PENNSYLVANIA

WITNESS

HON. HUGH SCOTT, U.S. SENATOR FROM THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA

Mr. CANNON. Senator Scott, of Pennsylvania, is present and we shall be very glad to hear from you at this time, Senator.

Senator Scott. I will be very brief. I will submit a statement and simply mention the highlights.

Mr. Chairman, I appear in behalf of flood control and other public works projects in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

First, in regard to what Mr. Flood has said, I agree with it and I underscore it. I have discussed this situation with Representative Flood. I have testified on the same subject and these other subjects this morning before the Appropriations Committee of the Senate. Chairman Ellender has indicated he will consider further the questions raised here by Mr. Flood and by myself.

As Mr. Flood said, this is a new problem. There is evidence now which was not available before as to the cause of mine subsidence and underground flooding and this will be further investigated by the Senate committee.

As to the Allegheny River Reservoir and Kinzua Dam, I support what Congressman Gavin and other witnesses have said.

And on French Creek and Turtle Creek and the Delaware River channel deepening and anchorages, I can only say I support the budget items for all of those projects.

Mr. CANNON. Thank you, Senator Scott. Your statement will be included in the record at this point.

(The statement follows:) Mr. Chairman, I appreciate very much this opportunity to appear before your committee in behalf of flood control and other public works projects in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

The budget requests for Pennsylvania projects for fiscal 1961 indicate sub stantial progress is being made, with one possible exception and one emergency situation which I will mention later in my statement.

Therefore, I am here today to support all of the budget items, although I will concentrate upon those projects which call for special attention.

ALLEGHENY RIVER RESERVOIR (KINZUA) Every year at appropriation time there arises with the spring floods in the Allegheny River Basin a certain disturbance known as “opposition to the location of the Kinzua Dam."

It takes the form of publicity in leading newspapers and statements by paid consultants representing the Seneca Indians.

Recently on the floor of the Senate, my colleague, the senior Senator from Pennsylvania and I entered into a colloquy on the selection of Kinzua Dam which we hoped would forever dissipate the emotional reactions inspired by this opposition.

I do not want to burden the record with this material mimeographed copies are available for the members should they wish them. It contains a quotation from this committee's report of last year, which, in my opinion, was the best answer we could offer.

As the committee knows, the site at Kinzua has been reviewed and re-reviewed over a period of 20 years. Alternate sites have been considered ad infinitum. The Congress has authorized and appropriated $4,098,000 for the project to date, and construction was actually started last year. The pending appropriation is for the modest sum of $4.5 million in construction funds.

There is no question of abrogation of a treaty with the Seneca Indians. They are citizens of the United States and subject to the law of eminent domain. Only a very few Indians live within the area to be used for the dam, and for the most part the Senecas are successful businessmen and farmers, who will be greatly benefited by the improvements and recreational possibilities to be brought about by the dam.

As a matter of fact, the Senecas own a great deal of land in the Conewango Valley under the same treaty of 1794, but they have no objection to that land being taken over under a plan that would cost at least one-third more than the Kinzua site, and result in the loss of more land, homes, and businesses. Furthermore, it would divert water from Pennsylvania into Lake Erie-creating a new set of problems with the State, plus international complications.

It is my earnest hope that the committee will again place this matter in its proper perspective. This project is moving ahead after years of delay, and is vital for control of the upper waters of the Allegheny River.

FRENCH CREEK

On French Creek, a tributary of the Allegheny River is another project which has been delayed over the years. The area in the vicinity of Meadville and down to Franklin was the scene of serious damage in the floods of January 1959. The committee will remember the delegation from Meadville which came before you last year urging a stepped-up flood control program.

It has been difficult to explain to the people of Meadville, Franklin, and surrounding cities that this project is being resurveyed and it will be some time before the approved plan can reach construction stage.

It is unfortunate, that in years past, an approved plan for a French Creek Reservoir at the Cambridge Springs site was objected to by the community and set aside for further study.

New survey money has been made available, and according to the Engineers the survey can be completed this year.

The $25,000 in the present budget is sufficient for this purpose, but my request is that it be expedited so the new plan—which is expected to take the form of

several smaller reservoirs and local protection-may be presented to the Congress for authorization at the earliest possible moment.

TURTLE CREEK

It is my understanding that a delegation from the Turtle Creek area is appear. ing before the House Appropriations Committee today, and may appear before this committee at a later time.

There are serious economic as well as flood control considerations on this project. Turtle Creek is bounded by heavy industries, and repeated flooding of industrial properties has cost millions. Modernization and expansion of plant. construction is at a standstill.

I do not need to tell the committee of the employment lag in the Pittsburgh area, or, in fact, in a number of western Pennsylvania cities. Threats of continued floods, year after year, will not only prevent attraction of job opportunities, but will certainly cause the shifting of plants and consequent unemployment of thousands.

Encouragement to offset this threat would be a stepup in preconstruction planning. The pending appropriation contains $150,000 to complete preliminary planning on the project. We have been assured this is sufficient to complete this phase. However, the Corps of Engineers has a 2-year schedule of preconstruction planning to follow, which would delay flood control construction until probably 1963.

It is my plea that the Corps of Engineers be requested to telescope their preconstruction planning into 1 year, so that it could be completed in fiscal 1962. I realize this is getting 1 year ahead of the committee's present considerations, but I hope to have some indication from the Engineers that this could be accomplished.

The problem is a real and continuing one. If this project can be expedited, I am sure it will be a great encouragement to business, and to the workingman and his family in Turtle Creek Valley.

EFFECT OF MINE SUBSIDENCE UPON LOCAL FLOOD PROTECTION IN THE

WYOMING VALLEY

It has recently been brought to my attention that the Corps of Engineers has been asked to estimate the cost of expanding a study of surface flooding upon inine subsidence—to include further investigation of the effect of mine subsidence upon the levee system along the Susquehanna, from Nanticoke to Pittston, Pa.

The surface flooding study is underway by the Bureau of Mines, and $495,000 would be required by both the Engineers and the Bureau for the expanded study.

The committee has received a copy of a letter from General Itschner, dated April 4, which supports this estimate and says that the work could be undertaken to advantage.

The entire Wyoming Valley which faces upon the Susquehanna, is pockmarked with abandoned anthracite mines. It is very much like sitting on top of a volcano, not knowing when it is going to erupt and toss you into the sea. The cities of Wilkes-Barre, Forty-Fort, Swoyersville, and Pittston are constantly experiencing subsidence incidents—with whole sections of the cities threatened.

Last October I witnessed subsidence of disaster proportions at Forty-Fortand after consultation with the Bureau of Mines was more than ever convinced it is a matter for Federal investigation.

No one knows what causes subsidence in this area adjacent to the Susquehanna. The system of levees constructed by the Corps of Engineers are con- stantly being repaired, as the levees sink below safety level. There is inference

that the pressure of water from without, either by surface flooding waters of

the Susquehanna or by subterranean seepage causes the subside ce. 3 Certainly we invite major disaster by ignoring or neglecting the flooding as

pects, and I wish to add my support to that of Congressman Daniel Flood, who represents the district, in behalf of an appropriation to determine what remedial action is necessary.

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DELAWARE RIVER CHANNEL DEEPENING AND ANCHORAGES

Emphasis in this year's presentation is upon the need for an initial appropria-' tion for four Delaware River anchorages authorized in 1958. A very complete

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presentation on this will be made by Mr. Harry G. Schad, chairman of the Executive Committee for Improvement and Development of the Philadelphia Port Area.

The approved project calls for enlarging the existing Mantua Creek and Marcus Hook anchorages and construction of new anchorages at Deeprater Point and Reedy Point.

To date no funds, except $42,000 for preauthorization studies, have been ap propriated. These anchorages are needed to afford anchorage space at the many terminals and refineries in the area. Enlargement of Mantua Creek and Marcus Ilook anchorages will allow larger vessels to swing at anchor without endanger. ing traffic passing in the channel. Marcus Hook is used not only by tankers consigned to nearby refineries, but also by vessels awaiting quarantine inspection.

An estimate requested from the district engineer at Philadelphia indicates that “from the strictly engineering viewpoint, considering each project by itself without reference to our overall program, etc., an amount of $300,000 could be utilized.” The district engineer's report (dated June 17, 1955), the basie document in the authorization procedure, recommended an initial allotment of $3 million would be desirable.

I am quite sure that an appropriation of $300,000 to initiate work on this anchorage expansion can be economically used in the forthcoming fiscal year, and I urge the committee's consideration.

Mr. Chairman, I thank the committee for the time granted to me.

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 1960.

TURTLE CREEK, PA.

WITNESSES

HON. ELMER J. HOLLAND, A REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM

THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA HON. JOHN H. DENT, A REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM THE

STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA HON. MAURICE K. GODDARD, SECRETARY OF FORESTS AND WATERS,

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA L. W. WHISNER, CHAIRMAN, TURTLE CREEK VALLEY FLOOD CON

TROL AUTHORITY JOHN EVAK, COUNCILMAN, TURTLE CREEK BOROUGH RAYMOND KASKIN, MEMBER, WILMERDING BOROUGH COUNCIL PAUL CARMICHAEL, PRESIDENT, LOCAL 601, INTERNATIONAL

UNIO ) OF ELECTRICAL, RADIO, & MACHINE WORKERS, AFL-C10 THOMAS F. SULLIVAN, BUSINESS AGENT OF LOCAL 601 FRANCIS X. McTIERNAN, VICE PRESIDENT, ASSOCIATION OF WEST

INGHOUSE SALARIED WORKERS DAVID HARPER, PRESIDENT, TURTLE CREEK CHAMBER OF COM

MERCE PATRICK CUSICK, PITTSBURGH REGIONAL PLANNING ASSOCIATION ROSS NESE, PRESIDENT, EAST PITTSBURGH BOROUGH COUNCIL

Mr. CANNON. The next project is the Turtle Creek project in which Congressman Holland of Pennsylvania is interested.

Congressman Holland, we shall be glad to hear from you at this time.

Mr. HOLLAND. Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, I appear before you as the representative of the most highly industrialized congressional district in Pennsylvania and also the most highly damaged by floodwaters, due to the location of the industries along our waterways.

Turtle Creek Valley has long been noted for its utter disregard of both individuals and industry and, with every spring, fears arise that the waters will again inundate the surrounding property and personal belongings will be lost as well as millions of dollars of machinery. Employment will be discontinued and the economy of the whole valley will suffer.

The budget this year specifies that $150,000 will be requested for the continuation of the present Turtle Creek Valley program and, while we are glad that this program is to be continued, we would like to ask for a larger appropriation so that the completion of the work could be accelerated. The budget contemplates the need for an additional $331,000 for construction planning after June 30, 1961. This budgetary schedule would permit the Corps of Engineers to begin actual construction late in the calendar year of 1962, which actually would be the fiscal year ending June 30, 1963. We would like to impress upon you the urgency for providing enough advance planning money in fiscal year 1961 to permit some of the construction work to begin the following year. I would not hesitate to say that the losses suffered by the workers, the companies, and the merchants in the past years would have more than paid for this program.

I appreciate the chance to tell you about our flood problem. It is an old story to your comittee as I have told it to you many times. However, I would like to refresh your minds about it with this statement I am submitting for your record.

I am also submitting, for your record, a list containing names of both individuals and organizations that have written me concerning the seriousness of this flood problem.

(The material referred to is as follows:)

LIST OF ORGANIZATIONS REQUESTING APPROPRIATIONS FOR TURTLE CREEK, PA.,

FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT

RESOLUTIONS

Board of Commissioners, Wilkins Township, Turtle Creek.
Turtle Creek Fire Department No. 1, Turtle Creek.
Lions Club of Forest Hills, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh.
East Suburban Multilist Brokers, Wilkinsburg, Pittsburgh.
Loyal Order of Moose, East Pittsburgh Lodge No. 1192, East Pittsburgh.

LETTERS

The Junior Woman's Club, Turtle Creek.
Dames of Malta, Cyprus Sisterhood No. 65, Turtle Creek.
The American Legion, Post No. 640, Turtle Creek.
American Legion Auxiliary, Turtle Creek Unit No. 640, Turtle Creek.
Manager, Mellon National Bank & Trust Co., East Pittsburgh.
Turtle Creek Ministerial Association, Turtle Creek.
Business & Professional Women's Club, Turtle Creek.
East Pittsburgh Businessmen's Association, East Pittsburgh.

RESOLUTION 361-60

A resolution of the township of Wilkins, county of Allegheny, Commonwealth

of Pennsylvania, requesting the Congress of the United States for action to relieve and prevent floods in the Turtle Creek Valley, Allegheny County, Pa.

Whereas the township of Wilkins is located in the Turtle Creek Valley geographic and economic area; and

54265_60_pt. 5—13

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