Page images
PDF
EPUB

our iron fence, after such deed of conveyance is executed to the Government, will be on the Government land. But your committee has no information sufficient to satisfy itself as to the true line and, therefore, is unwilling to grant any power to convey any land, or any claim to any land which the United States now owns at said point. In other words, we will accept land but will not grant land. If the showing made before us is correct, then that ought to be sufficient to satisfy all parties concerned. If it is not correct and if there be facts which have been withheld from your committee and if the Revere Copper & Brass Co. has some selfish motive in seeking an exchange of properties, then the interest of the United States Government will be protected and the entire truth must be disclosed before we recommend legislation. The report of the War Department is as follows:

DECEMBER 28, 1929. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

DEAR MR. SPEAKER: There is inclosed herewith draft of a bill for the exchange of lands at Detroit, Mich., in connection with the easterly boundary line of the Fort Wayne Military Reservation, which the War Department presents for the consideration of the Congress with a view to its enactment into law.

There is no existing law affecting the situation.

The Michigan Copper & Brass Co., through their attorney, have stated that the company recently caused a survey of their property to be made, which developed some slight differences as to the location of the boundary line between their property and the Fort Wayne Military Reservation, and they have requested the United States to join with them in preparing an accurate survey in order to straighten out these differences. There is at present a fence between the two properties which the company and the War Department are willing to accept as the boundary. Should any discrepancies be discovered in the boundary line established by the fence, the line of the present fence, will still be retained as the true boundary and the company will quitclaim to the United States property lying east of the boundary line so defined, and west of the fence, in exchange for which they will receive from the United States a quitclaim deed to all land lying west of the boundary line as shown by the survey and east of the present fence.

There will be no expenditure of funds in the exchange of these lands other than those which can be taken care of out of the appropriation “Contingencies of the Army.” Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY, Secretary of War. EXPLANATION OF BLUE PRINT ON FILE IN COMMITTEE Present true easterly boundary is yellow line.

Fence, built a number of years ago, now runs along red line and incloses as part of military reservation a strip of land (1,142.46 feet long, 2.66 feet wide at north end, and 3.17 feet wide at south end), which strip properly and rightfully belongs to Revere Copper & Brass (Inc.).

In view of the fact that the fence has stood unquestioned for many years, the Revere Copper & Brass (Inc.) now desires to rectify its title deeds by forever relinquishing claim to the strip (1,142.46 feet long by 2.66 feet wide north and 3.17 feet wide south) to the United States for the sum of $1.

No land now held by the United States will be relinquished, exchanged, or otherwise disposed of according to present survey. However, it is possible that a resurvey might show that acceptance of the old iron fence as the boundary between the properties actually does involve an exchange of lands. That is, a resurvey might show that one end of the old iron fence is west of the true boundary and the other end east thereof. It is in order to anticipate such an event that the language of the bill contains the words “to exchange by quit-claim deed, rather than words authorizing acceptance of a donation by the Revere Copper & Brass (Inc.).

In any case, the line of the existing iron fence is to be accepted by both parties and the United States will incur no expense except the sum of $1. In consideration of this $1 the United States will receive all of the strip that lies within the lands of the Revere Corporation by quit-claim deed.

EXCLUSION AND EXPULSION OF ALIEN COMMUNISTS

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. CABLE, from the Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 16296)

The Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 16296) to provide for the exclusion and expulsion of alien communists from the United States, having had the same under consideration, reports it back to the House with an amendment and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.

Page 1, line 6, strike out the dash and insert a semicolon.

The bill seeks to amend the act providing for the exclusion and expulsion of anarchists and similar classes of aliens who believe in the overthrow by force and violence of the Government of the United States, which act was approved October 16, 1918, and amended by the act of June 5, 1920.

This bill will strengthen our immigration and deportation law by adding the alien communist who believes in and advocates subversive revolutionary doctrines to the enumerated classes of those who are now by law subject to exclusion and/or deportation.

CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW In compliance with paragraph 2a of Rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, changes in the act, as amended, made by this bill are shown as follows: New matter is printed in italics; existing law in which no change is made is shown in roman.

That the following aliens shall be excluded from admission into the United States:

(a) Aliens who are anarchists or communists; (b) Aliens who advise, advocate, or teach, or who are members of or affiliated with any organization, association, society, or group, that advises, advocates, or teaches opposition to all organized government;

(c) Aliens who believe in, advise, advocate, or teach, or who are members of or affiliated with any organization, association, society, or group, that believes in, advises, advocates, or teaches: (1) The overthrow by force or violence of the Government of the United States or of all forms of law, or (2) the duty, necessity or propriety of the unlawful assaulting or killing of any officer or officers (either of specific individuals or of officers generally) of the Govern. ment of the United States or of any other organized government, because of his or their official character, or (3) the unlawful damage, injury, or destruction of property, or (4) sabotage;

(d) Aliens who write, publish, or cause to be written or published, or who knowingly circulate, distribute, print, or display, or knowingly cause to be circulated, distributed, printed, published, or displayed, or who knowingly have in their possession for the purpose of circulation, distribution, publication, or display, any written or printed matter advising, advocating, or teaching opposition to all organized government, or advising, advocating, or teaching: (1) The overthrow by force or violence of the Government of the United States or of all forms of law, or (2) the duty, necessity, or propriety of the unlawful assaulting or killing of any officer or officers (either of specific individuals or of officers generally) of the Government of the United States or of any other organized government, or (3) the unlawful damage, injury, or destruction of property, or (4) sabotage;

(e) Aliens who are members of or affiliated with any organization, association, society, or group, that writes, circulates, distributes, prints, publishes, or displays, or causes to be written, circulated, distributed, printed, published, or displayed, or that has in its possession for the purpose of circulation, distribution, publication, issue, or display, any written or printed matter of the character described in subdivision (d).

For the purpose of this section: (1) the giving, loaning or promising of money or anything of value to be used for the advising, advocacy, or teaching of any doctrine above enumerated shall constitute the advising, advocacy, or teaching of such doctrine; and (2) the giving, loaning or promising of money or anything of value to any organization, association, society, or group of the character above described shall constitute affiliation therewith; but nothing in this paragraph shall be taken as an exclusive definition of advising, advocacy, teaching, or affiliation.

Sec. 2. That any alien who, at any time, after entering the United States, is found to have been at the time of entry, or to have become thereafter, a member of any one of the classes of aliens enumerated in section one of this act, shall, upon the warrant of the Secretary of Labor, be taken into custody and deported in the manner provided in the immigration act of February fifth, nineteen hundred and seventeen. The provisions of this section shall be applicable to the classes of aliens mentioned in this act irrespective of the time of their entry into the United States.

SEC. 3. That any alien who shall, after he has been excluded and deported or arrested and deported in pursuance of the provisions of this act, thereafter return to or enter the United States or attempt to return to or to enter the United States shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by imprisonment for a term of not more than five years; and shall, upon the termination of such imprisonment, be taken into custody, upon the warrant of the Secretary of Labor, and deported in the manner provided in the immigration act of February fifth, nineteen hundred and seventeen.

[ocr errors]

1

PURCHASE OF STATE LABORATORY AT HAMILTON,

MONT.

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. MAPEs, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com

merce, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 16915)

The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 16915) authorizing the purchase of the State laboratory at Hamilton, Mont., constructed for the prevention, eradication, and cure of spotted fever, having considered and amended the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

Amend the bill as follows:

Line 3, after the words “That the" strike out the words "Surgeon General of the Public Health Service" and insert "Secretary of the Treasury" in lieu thereof.

Page 2, line 5, after the word "States” change the period to a comma and add the following: "and shall be administered and maintained as a part of the United States Public Health Service, Treasury Department."

The bill has the approval of the Treasury Department, as will appear by the letter attached.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, February 16, 1931. Hon. JAMES S. PARKER, Chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I beg leave to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of February 7 inclosing a copy of the bill (H. R. 16915), authorizing the sum of $75,000 for the purchase of the State laboratory, at Hamilton, Mont., constructed for the prevention, eradication, and cure of spotted fever, and an additional sum of $75,000 for constructing and equipping an additional building for the same purpose and for making any necessary alterations in the existing laboratory referred to.

In 1903 the State Board of Health of Montana requested the United States Public Health Service to undertake an investigation of spotted fever. Since that time the Public Health Service has worked continuously in cooperation with the State Board of Health of Montana, except for several years during and following the World War. During this period of cooperation five members of the service have lost their lives.

The State of Montana erected a laboratory especially designed for the study of this and other tick-borne diseases and has expended approximately $300,000 in these studies.

Spotted fever has continued to spread until it has become a very definita interstate problem, affecting at least 13 Western States.

The United States Public Health Service has originated and is now manufacturing an effective vaccine for spotted fever. The demand for this vaccine which began in a very small way has almost doubled each year of its use until at the present time the State laboratory at Hamilton is too small to contain the work. On account of the great danger connected with the manufacture of this vaccine it has been impossible to get any commercial concern to undertake its manufacture, and on account of the serious nature of the disease itself, and its high mortality, I am of the opinion that the United States Government is obligated to continue the preparation of the vaccine which is at the present time our only method of protecting those who may be exposed to the disease. I am supported in this opinion by the health officials of the various States.

Last week the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service informed me that spotted fever has been found in several of the States along the Atlantic seaboard. This information I consider to be of such a very serious nature that I believe that the Federal Government should bend every effort to control the spread of this disease.

The following changes in the bill are respectfully suggested:

Section 1, page 1, line 3: Strike out the words “the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service” and insert instead “the Secretary of the Treasury."

Section 1, page 2, line 5: After the words “United States”, add, "and shall be administered and maintained as a part of the United States Public Health Service, Treasury Department."

The bill so modified has the approval of this department.

It may be added that the Director of the Bureau of the Budget advises that the expenditure contemplated by the proposed legislation is not in conflict with the financial program of the President. Very truly yours,

OGDEN L. Mills, Acting Secretary of the Treasury.

« PreviousContinue »