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fornia, which the War Department presents for the consideration of the Congress with a view to its enactment into law.

There is no existing law which appears to be applicable to this matter.

These timber rights were reserved by the former owners in conveying title to the land to the United States in 1917. The location is about 6 miles east of the city of Monterey, and except for the grounds at Fort Lewis, Wash., this is the only military reservation on the Pacific coast where important maneuvers, including the firing of field artillery, may be held. The purchase in 1917 of the main tract of over 15,600 acres at the rather low price of $10 per acre, was exclusive of the merchantable timber growing thereon. Timber cutting has progressed steadily, and at the present rate all of the merchantable growth will have been removed before the expiration of the rights in 1942.

In view of the development regarding the effectiveness of aircraft observation work, the advantage of trees as a screen becomes increasingly important to the forces operating on the ground, and it appears that the larger live-oak trees on this land are especially valuable in this connection. Furthermore, in addition to the desirability of preserving the natural beauty of the landscape, the shade of the large trees and groves will undoubtedly be a needed comfort for both men and animals at periods of rest during training in the heated season.

The parties in interest have indicated a willingness to yield those timber rights to the Government on reasonable terms and have been good enough to avoid cutting, for the time being, of selected large trees and groups pointed out by the officer in charge until there was opportunity to apply for authority for purchase. Suspension of operations at designated places can not be expected to be continued indefinitely and the entire extinguishment of the private timber rights is believed to be advisable. The cost will not exceed the net value of the remaining stumpage, about $1.60 per acre considering the tract as a whole. Should it later develop that a small amount of cutting may be done at places where military training would not be adversely affected, the operations can be conducted under Government supervision. Supply of firewood, in whole or in part, for the post of the Presidio of Monterey could be obtained from that source and any surplus could be disposed of in an authorized manner at fair prices.

The estimated cost of the proposed legislation is $25,000.

Accompanying are copies of correspondence showing reports by the local commanding officer, and timber survey report by representatives of the United States Forest Service, which afford further details. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War. O

TO ACQUIRE 75 ACRES OF LAND FOR FORT RINGGOLD,

TEX.

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. WAINWRIGHT, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 15768]

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was presented the bill (H. R. 15768) to authorize the Secretary of War to acquire 75 acres of land, more or less, in the vicinity of and for use in connection with the present military reservation at Fort Ringgold, Tex., and for other purposes, introduced by Mr. James of Michigan at the request of the War Department, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass with the following amendment:

Line 11, strike out “$12,500" and insert in lieu thereof “$7,500”.

This amendment is recommended, as your committee feel this land, which is used as grazing land, is worth not more than $100 an

acre.

It is deemed essential to acquire this land to insure the maintenance of a target range at Fort Ringgold. The range at this post is used both by Fort Ringgold and Fort Brown, and there is no other possible location for the range on the present reservation or in the vicinity thereof. The land desired is utilized at present as grazing land. Several head of cattle have been killed by wild shots going to land not owned by the Government, and when the proposed irrigation canal is put through this vicinity there will be danger to human beings who will cultivate the fields. Hearings have been held on this measure by your committee.

The letter of the Secretary of War explaining the measure is as follows:

DECEMBER 30, 1930. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

DEAR MR. SPEAKER: There is inclosed the draft of a bill “To authorize the Secretary of War to acquire 75 acres of land, more or less, in the vicinity of and for use in connection with the present military reservation at Fort Ringgold, Tex., and for other purposes," which the War Department presents for consideration of the Congress with a view to its enactment into law.

The lands which it is proposed to acquire consist of three tracts adjacent to and lying north and east of the present Fort Ringgold Military Reservation, Tex., and are deemed essential to insure the maintenance of a target range at this post for the reasons as indicated below:

With the target range as at present located the butts, built up of dirt on a level flat, are approximately 200 yards from the north edge of the reservation and the east end of the butts touches the east boundary of the reservation. A large number of ricochets and wild shots go on to land not owned by the Government and several head of cattle have already been killed. All of the land desired is at present utilized merely as grazing land. Construction has already started on an irrigation canal to extend from Roma (14 miles west) to Garcias (11 miles east), which canal would pass across the land which it is proposed to purchase north of the present target butts. The irrigation project when completed will make the lower land in the area desired suitable for cultivation. The danger will then be to human beings cultivating the fields instead of to animals. In the proposed change of the target range a hill behind the targets will furnish a natural backstop and the two noses of the hill on either side will catch ricochets. Any ricochets at high angles will fall upon the reservation.

The range at this post is very important in that it is used by both this post and Fort Brown, Tex. There is no other possible location for this range on the present reservation. No suitable location for the range is known to exist elsewhere in this vicinity and were such a location available it would be necessary to purchase more land than under the present plan at approximately the same price per acre.

In firing on the present range the 500 and 600 yard firing points are located south of the Missouri Pacific Railroad and the remainder of the range is north of the railroad. This is both dangerous and unsatisfactory. The cut through the mesquite for the railroad allows a peculiar cross wind which is difficult to combat at 600 yards.

The butts as at present located are excavated below the level of the ground where the range is built and are subject to flooding several times each year when the Olmos Crcek rises. The result is that for varying lengths of time the range can not be used and permanent installations of the range are damaged. The new butts, if the land is acquired, will be placed above flood level, and being on a hillside will drain rapidly.

The State Highway at present makes a double s turn in order to avoid crossing the present target range." The deepest curve is to the south into the flying field. It is believed that if the range were moved, the State would be glad to straighten out its highway. Due largely to the curve in the highway the flying field is so narrow as to allow planes to land and take off in only two directions. By the change in the highway the field would be widened sufficiently to allow use in any direction.

The Government is at present purchasing gravel for cement work, roads, walks, etc., at 12 cents per load and hauling it about a mile and a half from a gravel pit northwest of Rio Grand City. Gravel can be obtained on the land to be purchased and the haul materially shortened.

The irrigation canal heretofore referred to would pass across the land which is desired, and if the Government should purchase the land it is believed that in return for the right of way the Government can obtain a certain amount of water for irrigation purposes without cost.

It is believed for the reasons stated above and in the interest of economy the purchase of this land should be consummated at the earliest practicable date, for with the completion of the irrigation project the price of all land within that vicinity will increase in value.

In view of the foregoing I recommend that the proposed bill be enacted into law.

The estimated fiscal effect of the proposed bill will, as indicated in the draft, involve an expenditure not to exceed $12,500.

If any additional information is desired from the War Department I shall be pleased to furnish it. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War O

AUTHORIZE AN APPROPRIATION FOR THE PRESERVATION AND REPAIR OF HISTORICAL FORTIFICATIONS AT FORT NIAGARA, N. Y.

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. WAINWRIGHT, from the Committee on Military affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 15770)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 15770) to authorize an appropriation for the preservation and repair of historical fortifications at Fort Niagara, N. Y., and for other purposes, introduced by Mr. James of Michigan at the request of the War Department, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass with the following amendment:

Line 8, after the word “purpose" insert "which shall first be paid into the Treasury of the United States”.

The purpose of this amendment is to safeguard the interests of the Government.

This project is necessitated by the crumbling of the sea wall at old Fort Niagara, the estimated cost being $70,000. The Fort Niagara Association is to contribute an equal amount to that carried in this bill, namely, $35,000, for this improvement. The investment already made there appears to warrant the immediate repairs to the wall. At the very top of the reservation, at a point adjacent to the sea wall, there is an old French castle and barracks which are of historical interest, having been built by the French in 1700. The old Fort Niagara Association has already contributed approximately $58,000 for the restoration of the old castle and French barracks. Hearings have been held on this bill by your committee. The letter of the War Department is as follows:

DECEMBER 19, 1930. The SPEAKER, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

DEAR MR. SPEAKER: There is inclosed the draft of a bill to authorize an appropriation for the preservation and repair of historical fortifications at Fort Niagara, N. Y., and for other purposes, which the War Department presents for the early consideration of the Congress with a view to its enactment into law. There are no existing laws authorizing appropriations for the preservation and repair of fortifications of historical interest in the United States and its insular possessions that have not been declared National Monuments under the provi. sions of the act of June 8, 1906. (34 Stat., 225.)

By the end of the fiscal year 1931, approximately $155,000 will have been expended for repair, rehabilitation and restoration work at old Fort Niagara, of which amount approximately $58,000 has been contributed by the Old Fort Niagara Association. Present estimates indicate that approximately $114,000, including the present item of $35,000 in addition to the $35,000 to be contributed by local interests, will be required to complete this project. The necessity for the instant legislation is to authorize an early appropriation for repairs to the sea wall in order to prevent further undermining of existing walls and thereby protect the investment already made, and that contemplated in the old fort area at Fort Niagara, N. Y.

The fiscal effect of the proposed bill is to authorize an appropriation of $35,000 for the proposed work at Fort Niagara, N. Y. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY, Secretary of War.

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