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TO WIDEN FORT THOMAS AVENUE, FORT THOMAS, KY.

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mrs. Kahn, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 10253)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 10253) to amend the act of December 5, 1928, entitled "An act to authorize the city of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, to widen, improve, reconstruct, and resurface Fort Thomas Avenue and to assess the cost thereof against the United States according to front feet of military reservation abutting thereon, and authorizing an appropriation therefor," introduced by Mr. Newhall, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it

do pass.

On December 5, 1928, the President signed a bill passed by Congress reading as follows:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the authorities of the city of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, are hereby authorized to widen, improve, reconstruct, and resurface Fort Thomas Avenue with concrete curbing and paving, including sidewalks, under the supervision and subject to the approval of the Secretary of War, and are authorized to assess and apportion the cost thereof against the United States according to the number of front and abutting feet of ground of the United States military reservation in the same proportion and to the same extent that the cost is assessed and apportioned against other owners of private property fronting and abutting on said street, and the sum of $11,000 is hereby authorized to be appropriated out of any money in the Treasury, not otherwise appropriated, to pay for said improvements abutting approximately one thousand five hundred feet on said street when the same are completed, and same to be paid on approval of the Secretary of War.

The purpose of this amendment to the law is to change the amount of the appropriation to $14,000.

In explanation of the necessity for the present bill Mr. Newhall who introduced the measure, makes the following statement:

DECEMBER 19, 1930. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR COLLEAGUE: Reference is made to the bill, H. R. 10253, which I introduced in the House during the month of February, 1930, for the purpose of amending the act of December 5, 1928, entitled, “An act to authorize the city of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, to widen, improve, reconstruct, and resurface Fort Thomas Avenue and to assess the cost thereof against the United States according to the front feet of military reservation abutting thereon and authorizing an appropriation therefor.

On April 30, 1928, the Hon. Orie S. Ware introduced H. R. 13406, which authorized the city of Fort Thomas to reconstruct Fort Thomas Avenue and appropriated $15,000 therefor. However, this amount was reduced to $11,000 and the act was passed and approved December 5, 1928.

When this reduction of appropriation was made, it was obviously applicable to the street construction only, since both street and sidewalks could not be constructed for $11,000. The construction of the street has now been completed as well as all sidewalks of private property owners abutting on the street. However, since no additional appropriation has been authorized for the purpose of constructing the sidewalks along the military reservation, they remain the same and it is needless to say that they are hardly recognizable as sidewalks.

I sincerely trust that the Committee on Military Affairs will see fit to report the above mentioned H. R. 10253 in order that the improvement along the military reservation may be completed. Very truly yours,

J. LINCOLN Newhall, M. C. The Secretary of War reporting on the measure calls attention to the moral obligation resting upon the department, in which your committee concurs. The letter of the department reads as follows:

MAY 10, 1930. Hon. HARRY C. RANSLEY, Acting Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. RANSLEY: Careful consideration has been given to bill H. R. 10253, transmitted with your letter of April 16, 1930, with request for a report thereon and such views relative thereto as the department might desire to communicate.

The instant bill would amend the act of December 5, 1928, entitled “An act to authorize the city of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, to widen, improve, reconstruct, and resurface Fort Thomas Avenue and to assess the cost thereof against the United States according to front feet of military reservation abutting thereon, and authorizing an appropriation therefor," by increasing the amount authorized to be appropriated in the original bill ($11,000) to $14,000.

The necessity for the additional expenditure of $3,000 is due to the fact that when the project was completed it developed that the pro rata assessment chargeable to the United States property frontage was in excess of the amount appropriated. It has been determined that to complete the obligation already incurred on the roadway and to construct a proper sidewalk will cost $3,000.

I favor the passage of the bill for the following reason:

The other owners of property along the improved Fort Thomas Avenue have constructed sidewalks, and it is therefore incumbent upon the War Department to fulfill its moral obligation to construct that portion of the sidewalk along the street which abuts the Fort Thomas Military Reservation. It is estimated that the total cost of the bill if enacted into law will be $3,000. Sincerely yours,

F. TRUBEE Davison.

Acting Secretary of War. O

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ADDITIONAL LAND FOR LANGLEY FIELD, VA.

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. HILL of Alabama, from the Committee on Military Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 10370)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 10370) to authorize the acquisition for military purposes of land in Virginia for use as an addition to Langley Field, introduced by Mr. James at the request of the War Department, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

This is a measure to authorize the acquisition of a heavily wooded tract of land immediately west of the airdrome at Langley Field. This wooded section blocks the landing field and is particularly dangerous for planes in taking off or landing, especially at night. Hearings have been held on this bill.

The letter of the War Department explaining the measure is as follows:

WAR DEPARTMENT, February 25, 1930. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

DEAR MR. SPEAKER: There is inclosed a draft of bill, “To authorize the acquisition for military purposes of land in Virginia for use as an addition to Langley Field,” which the War Department.presents for the consideration of the Congress with the request that it be enacted into law.

It is proposed to purchase a heavily wooded tract of land immediately west of the airdrome. The woods constitute a very serious hazard and interference with flying and training operations. High trees in this tract have been the cause of an accident resulting in the death of two men. Depending upon the direction of the wind, it is necessary at times for planes in taking off or landing to pass over this area.

The danger is particularly great for night flying. The land is the property of the Hampton Normal Institute at Hampton, Va. The board of directors of this institution has agreed to accept $150 per acre for the land. This price is considered reasonable. The total estimated cost of $7,500 is but a fraction of the total loss that may be sustained in a single accident resulting from this hazard. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War O

AUTHORIZE SECRETARY OF WAR TO ACQUIRE TIMBER RIGHTS

ON GIGLING FIELD ARTILLERY RANGE IN CALIFORNIA

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mrs. Kahn, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 11102]

do pass.

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 11102) to authorize the Secretary of War to acquire the timber rights on Gigling Field Artillery target range in California, introduced by Mr. James at the request of the War Department, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it

These timber rights were reserved by the former owners on conveyance of the land to the United States

for the Gigling Field Artillery target range. When the land was bought, in 1916 and 1917, the price was $10 per acre, which was considered an excellent bargain. However, conditions have changed since then and it is now considered desirable to buy out the timber rights which have until 1942 to run. In view of the development regarding the effectiveness of aircraft observation work the advantage of trees as a screen becomes increasingly important to the forces operating on the ground, and it appears that the larger live-oak trees on this land are especially valuable in this connection. This reservation is the only military reservation on the Pacific coast with the exception of Fort Lewis, Wash., where important maneuvers including the firing of field artillery may be held. In arriving at the value of the rights the War Department has had the assistance of the Department of Agriculture. Hearings have been held on this bill.

The letter from the Secretary of War which explains the measure fully is made a part of this report as follows:

MARCH 22, 1930. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

Dear Mr. SPEAKER: There is inclosed the draft of a bill to authorize the acquisition of the timber rights on Gigling Field Artillery target range in Cali

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