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FEBRUARY 20, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. McSwain, from the Committee on Military affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 7505)

pass.

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 7505) to authorize the construction of a sea wall at Fort Randolph, Panama Canal, introduced by Mr. James of Michigan at the request of the War Department, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do

The sea wall required at Fort Randolph is not of very heavy construction because of the fact that there are coral reefs out some distance from the shore which break the force of the waves, but the waves that do come into the shore at Fort Randolph cause erosion. This erosion has almost reached the service road in the rear of the officers' quarters and has already threatened the operating position of one of the searchlights. Hearings have been held on this measure by your committee.

The letter from the Secretary of War requesting the enactment of this legislation is as follows:

OCTOBER 11, 1929. CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: It is requested that the following draft of a bill be introduced and enacted into law:

“A BILL To authorize the construction of a ses wall at Fort Randolph, Panama Canal Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of War is hereby authorized to provide for the construction of a sea wall along the water front of Fort Randolph in the Panama Canal Zone for the protection of United States property, and the sum of $84,000 is hereby authorized to be appropriated for such purpose. which sum shall remain available until expended."

There are no applicable provisions of existing law.

The shore line of the part of the reservation along which it is now proposed to construct a sea wall is exposed to the open sea on the windward side of the reservation during certain seasons of the year. When storms and heavy winds emanate from the Atlantic side, the wave action is severe and causes considerable erosion. This erosion, if allowed to continue, will eventually reach the parapets. The operating position of one of the searchlights is already threatened. Also, the continued erosion will ultimately result in undermining the row of officers' quarters. It is therefore of great importance that such erosion be checked without delay.

If any additional information is desired from the War Department, I shall be pleased to furnish it. Should hearings be held upon the proposed legislation, suitable witnesses will be designated to appear.

The proposed legislation has been submitted to the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, who advises that it is not in conflict with the financial program of the President. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Acting Secretary of War. O

RIGHT OF WAY FOR SEWER PIPE LINE AT FORT BRAGG

MILITARY RESERVATION, N. C.

FEBRUARY 20, 1931.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. WAINWRIGHT, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 10884)

it do pass.

The Committee on Military Affairs to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 10884) to authorize the acquisition of a right of way for sewer line in connection with the Fort Bragg Military Reservation, N. C., introduced by Mr. James at the request of the War Department, having considered the same report thereon with the recommendation that

During the period of 1917 and 1918 the land was acquired for Camp Bragg and things were very hurriedly done and construction pushed through as rapidly as possible. The main trunk line sewer for the camp was located for about 1,700 feet on land which the Government did not hold title to, nor have since acquired title to. There was a purchase agreement at the time but owing to objections brought out by the Government the arrangements were not carried through. The purpose of this legislation is to purchase a right of way for the sewer pipe line in order to avoid future claims for use and occupancy. The owners have asked a price which is considered excessive and this easement will have to be acquired through condemnation. Hearings have been held on this bill.

The letter of the War Department requesting the enactment of this measure is as follows:

MARCH 15, 1930. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

DEAR MR. SPEAKER: There is inclosed the draft of a bill to authorize the acquisition of a right of way for sewer pipe line in connection with the Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Ñ. C., which the War Department presents for the consideration of the Congress with a view to its enactment into law.

There are no pertinent provisions of existing law affecting the purchase of the right of way requested.

HR-71-3/VOL 2- 47

Fort Bragg was established as an artillery range during the period of the World War and consists of approximately 120,477 acres. It is situated in Hoke and Cumberland Counties, N. C., and approximately 600 parcels were acquired by direct purchase or through condemnation between 1919 and 1921 at a cost of $2,624,950. It was designated as a permanent military post on September 30, 1922, and is headquarters for a number of field artillery units and during the summer months is used for the training of field artillery of the National Guard and Organized Reserves. In the construction of the camp, a sewer system was established with an outlet in the Little River across certain property of the 0. A. Waddell estate and the Carolina Power & Light Co. The land upon which the sewer is located was never acquired from the original owners, nor were leases entered into for the use thereof. The owners later entered a claim for use and occupancy of their land, which claim has been passed upon by the War Department and forwarded to the Comptroller General for settlement. Because of the impossibility of removing this sewer line to a location situated on Governmentowned property, it becomes necessary, in order to avoid future claims for use and occupancy, to acquire a permanent easement or right of way through these properties. The owners have asked a price which is considered excessive and this easement will, therefore, have to be acquired through condemnation. The estimated cost of the proposed bill is approximately $1,500. Sincerely yours

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War. O

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