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CONGRESS

, Congress

ADDITIONAL LAND, SCHENECTADY MILITARY

RESERVATION

FEBRUARY 19, 1931.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. WAINWRIGHT, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub

mitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 4201)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 4201) to authorize the acquisition of the outstanding interests in land in the military reservation of Schenectady general depot, New York, introduced by Mr. James at the request of the War Department, having considered the same report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

This is a measure to authorize the acquisition of the outstanding interests in land in the military reservation of Schenectady general depot, N. Y. At a stage when completion of purchase had been affected for most of the tracts restrictions were imposed against further acquisitions of real estate and this continued until relieved by Congress by acts of March 8 and July 1, 1922 (42 Stats. 418 and 777), by which there was released for further application to completing purchases for this site the sum of $3,000. So far as practicable attention was given thereto, up to June 30, 1928, when the small balance lapsed. The tracts still to be acquired have been occupied by the Government in the same manner as the other tracts since the establishment of the reservation. Contacts have been made with the parties interested and it is regarded that the completion of the acquisition will be in the interest of the Government and will permit fair treatment to be accorded to the private interests involved.

The letter of the Secretary of War recommending the enactment of this measure is as follows:

AUGUST 16, 1929.
Hon. W. FRANK JAMES,
Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives.
DEAR MR. James: It is requested that the following draft of bill be intro-
duced and enacted into law:

11

“A BILL To authorize the acquisition of the outstanding interests in land in the military reservation of

Schenectady general depot, New York Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of War be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to acquire by. purchase, condemnation, or otherwise, for military purposes, all outstanding interests in and to such lots, parcels or tracts of land within the present general boundaries of the military reservation of Schenectady General Depot (formerly known as Army Reserve Depot), Schenectady, New York, as have not heretofore been obtained, and there is authorized to be appropriated for this purpose not to exceed $1,000.”

The depot was established in the World War period. The sum of $250,000 was allotted for the purchase of the land out of the fund of $100,000,000 placed at the disposal of the President by the urgent deficiency act of April 17, 1917. There had been extensive sales of residence lots in a newly platted subdivision on a part of the site selected for the depot and accordingly there were a large number of owners of land to be dealt with. Changes of residence by many and want of appropriate authority in the administration of estates added to the difficulties and delays in securing titles for record purposes.

At a stage when completion had been effected for most of the tracts, restrictions were imposed against further acquisitions of real estate and this continued until relieved by Congress by acts of March 8, and July 1, 1922 (42 Stats., 418 and 777), by which there was released for further application for this site the sum of $3,000. Attention was given thereto, so far as practicable, up to June 30, 1928, when the small balance of this appropriation lapsed.

A few lots still remain on which title is to be completed and payment made. They have been occupied by the Government, in the same manner as have the other tracts, from the establishment of the reservation. It is not practicable to exclude these lots from such general occupancy. One party in interest is an individual, with whom contact was not obtained to secure a deed, but whose address is now known. Two other interests are those of estates, for which permission for sale and conveyance has not heretofore been secured.

It is regarded that completion of the acquisition will be in the interest of the Government and will permit fair treatment to be accorded to the private interests involved.

If any additional information from the War Department is desired, I shall be pleased to furnish it. If the Committee on Military Affairs wishes to have hearings on the proposed legislation a suitable witness will be designated to appear before your committee.

This proposed legislation has been submitted to the Director of the Bureau of
the Budget, who advises that the same is not in conflict with the financial program
of the President.
Sincerely yours,

James W. Good, Secretary of War.
O

COLLECTION OF ANNUAL STATISTICS RELATING TO

PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

FEBRUARY 19, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Rankin, from the Committee on the Census, submitted the

following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 1812)

The Committee on the Census, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1812) to authorize the collection of annual statistics relating to certain public institutions, have considered the same and report thereon with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

The bill has the approval of the Department of Commerce, as will appear from the annexed communications which are made a part of this report, and which read as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE,

Washington, December 10, 1929. Hon. W. L. Jones, Chairman Committee on Commerce,

United States Senate. MY DEAR SENATOR: I have your letter of the 21st ultimo, requesting a report from this department on S. 1812, entitled “To authorize the collection of annual statistics relating to certain public institutions.

For the information of your committee I am inclosing herewith a memorandum dated November 26, 1929, from the Director of the Bureau of the Census regard. ing this bill; also a letter from the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, dated December 6, 1929. Very truly yours,

E. F. MORGAN, Acting Secretary of Commerce.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE,

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS,

Washington, November 26, 1929. Memorandum for the Secretary regarding a bill authorizing the collection annually of statistics concerning public institutions (S. 1812).

The act approved March 6, 1902, authorized the collection decennially of statistics relating “to the defective, dependent, and delinquent classes; to crime, including judicial statistics pertaining thereto." Following the decennial census

HR-71-3-VOL 241

of these classes, which under that act was taken in the year 1923, the Secretary authorized the Director of the Census to collect annually statistics concerning inmates of penal institutions and of institutions for the care of the mentally diseased and of feeble-minded and epileptics. Under this authorization, statistics have been collected for 1926, 1927, and 1928.

This bill (S. 1812) is intended to place this work on a permanent basis. Such legislation is deemed necessary because the authorization granted by the Secretary was more or less provisional and limited in scope. The bill, it is believed, should be broad enough to cover the annual collection of the statistics which, under the act of 1902, were to be collected only once in 10 years. It is therefore recommended that it be changed as follows: Omit the words “inmates of institutions for" on line 5 and insert in place thereof the words “crime and the" and that the title of the bill be changed by striking out the words “certain public institutions" and inserting in place thereof the words to “crime and to the defective, dependent, and delinquent classes," so that the bill will read as follows: “A BILL To authorize the collection of annual statistics relating to crime and to the defective, dependent,

and delinquent classes "Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Director of the Census be, and hereby is, authorized to compile and publish annually statistics relating to crime and to the defective, dependent, and delinquent classes."

W. M. STEUART, Director.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington, December 6, 1929. MY DEAR MR. SECRETARY: I have the department's letter of the 29th ultimo concerning S. 1812, a bill to authorize the collection of annual statistics relating to certain institutions.

You are advised that the expenditure contemplated by this proposed legislation would not be in conflict with the financial program of the President.

The inclosures accompanying your letter of the 29th ultimo are returned herewith. Sincerely yours,

J. CLAWSON Roop, Director. The SECRETARY OF COMMERCE.

O

CONGRESS

COURT OF CLAIMS TO ADJUDICATE CLAIMS OF CERTAIN

BANDS OF INDIANS IN OREGON

FEBRUARY 19, 1931.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Williamson, from the Committee on Indian Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 3335]

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 3335) conferring jurisdiction upon the Court of Claims to hear and determine claims of certain bands of Indians residing in the State of Oregon, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass with the following amendment:

Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert in lieu thereof the following:

That įurisdiction is hereby conferred on the Court of Claims, with the right of appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States, by either party, as in other cases, to hear, examine, adjudicate, and render final judgment in any and all legal and equitable claims arising under or growing out of any treaty, agreement, act of Congress, Executive order, or otherwise, which certain Indian tribes or bands, or portions thereof, and their descendants may have against the United States, namely, the Indian described in the ratified treaties of September 10, 1853 (10 Stat. 1018), September 19, 1853 (10 Stat. 1027), November 18, 1854 (10 Stat. 1122), November 25, 1854 (10 Stat. 1125), January 22, 1855 (10 Stat. 1143), and December 21, 1855 (12 Stat. 981); together with those described in the unratified treaties published in Senate Executive Document No. 25, Fifty-third Congress, first session (pages 8 to 15), except the Coos Bay, Lower Umpana, and Siuslaw Tribes, it being the intention of this act to include all the Indian tribes, or band's, residing in the State of Oregon, west of the Cascade Range at the dates of the said treaties, respectively, and their descendants, some of whom, in 1855 or later, were removed by the military authorities of the United States to the Siletz on the Grande Ronde Reservation, in the said States, except the three tribes last named.

SEC. 2. That if any claim or claims be submitted to said courts hereunder they shall settle the rights therein, both legal and equitable, of each and all the parties thereto, notwithstanding the lapse of time or the statutes of limitation; and any payment which may have been made upon any such claim shall not operate as an estoppel but may be pleaded as a set-off, and the United States shall be allowed to plead and shall receive credit for all sums, including gratuities if properly chargeable, paid to or expended for the benefit of any of said nations, tribes, or

The claim or claims of each nation, tribe, or band may be

bands of Indians.

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