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RELIEVING COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF

COLUMBIA OF CERTAIN MINISTERIAL DUTIES

FEBRUARY 19, 1931.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. ZIHLMAN, from the Committee on the District of Columbia,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 4963]

lation do pass.

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to which was referred the bill (S. 4963) to relieve the Commissioners of the District of Columbia of certain ministerial duties, having considered the same, report back to the House with the recommendation that the legis

The purpose of this bill is to release the commissioners from a considerable amount of routine work, necessitated by the signing of certain official papers of the District of Columbia government.

Under the terms of the bill the secretary of the Board of Commissioners would be permitted legally to sign such documents in the name of the District or of the Board of Commissioners, and to affix the District seal when requisite.

The bill specifically provides, however, that before such papers may be signed, their contents must have been considered and approved by a meeting of the Board of Commissioners, and their approval noted in the minutes of the meeting, which minutes must be signed by a majority of the board. The documents to which this bill refers are deeds, contracts, pleadings, leases, releases, regulations and other papers which the commissioners are now obliged to sign.

The commissioners' letter, asking the introduction and passage of this legislation is appended hereto and made a part of this report, and the committee knows of no opposition to the measure.

HR-71-3-VOL 2- 40

WASHINGTON, November 25, 1930. Hon. F. N. ZIALMAN, Chairman Committee on the District of Columbia,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. Sir: The commissioners of the District of Columbia have the honor to submit herewith draft of a bill entitled “A bill to relieve the Commissioners of the District of Columbia of certain ministerial duties."

The object of this bill is to relieve the Commissioners of the District of Columbia of a great deal of burdensome work of signing official papers and to place this duty upon the Secretary of the Board of Commissioners.

The commissioners will continue to exercise the functions placed upon them by law of considering and approving all matters referred to in the proposed law, but they will be relieved of the actual execution of the instruments therein referred to. They believe that the passage of this legislation will enable them to give greater time to the larger public problems of administration by relieving them of much detail, which can well be performed by the Secretary of the Board of Commissioners. Very truly yours,

L. H. REICHELDERFER. President Board of Commissioners of District of Columbia.

AMENDING ACT RELATING TO DEGREE-CONFERRING

INSTITUTIONS

FEBRUARY 19, 1931.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. ZIHLMAN, from the Committee on the District of Columbia,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 5465)

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (S. 5465) to amend section 586c of the act entitled "An act to amend subchapter 1 of chapter 18 of the Code of Laws for the District of Columbia relating to degree-conferring institutions," approved March 2, 1929, having considered the same, reports back to the House with the recommendation that the legislation do pass.

The purpose of this bill is to exempt from a restriction of the act referred to certain reputable institutions of learning now established in foreign lands.

The act was intended to correct the "diploma-mill” evil in the District of Columbia, which after investigation showed that many socalled universities were issuing, to correspondence students, degrees in medicine, dentistry, and other studies. In order that the public might be safeguarded from any misapprehension that a private educational institution had any official connection with the Government, the act contained a prohibition against the use of the words "American,” “United States," "Federal," and the like, in the title of any institution of learning incorporated in the District of Columbia.

The Board of Education of the District of Columbia was given authority in the act to issue licenses to institutions incorporated in the District. Lacking this license, such institutions are barred from law from conferring degrees.

AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES ABROAD

There was no intent, so far as the committee can determine, to forbid the use of the word "American" in the titles of institutions in foreign lands, where the word would serve solely to indicate place , School of Classical Studies at Athens, the American University at Beirut, and other well-known schools and colleges abroad.

The committee knows of only one instance of such an institution which would fall under the provisions of the present law. This is the American University at Cairo, Egypt. It is a place of learning of high standard, and its qualifications have been investigated thoroughly by the Board of Education. So far as the committee knows, it is the only important American university abroad which is incorporated in the District of Columbia.

Under existing law this university will be compelled to reincorporate in the District under another title, because of its use of the word "American," or to incorporate in another State under the same title.

CONTENTS OF THE BILL

The bill under consideration would permit the amendment of the existing law to provide that no institution heretofore incorporated under the act, and carrying on its work exclusively in a foreign country with the approval of the government thereof, shall, if complying in all other respects with the law, be denied a license by the Board of Education because of “inclusion in its name and as descriptive of its origin” of any of the words forbidden under the act.

This bill was considered by the Board of Education and the Commissioners of the District of Columbia and has their approval. The Commissioner's letter to Hon. Arthur Capper, chairman of the Senate Committee on the District of Columbia, is appended hereto and made a part of this report.

The committee is of the opinion that this bill will not in any way weaken the force and effect of the act it is intended to amend, and will prevent an injustice to existing educational institutions of known merit and good standing.

WASHINGTON, January 9, 1931. Hon. ARTHUR CAPPER, Chairman Committee on the District of Columbia,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. Sir: The Commissioners of the District of Columbia have the honor to submit the following on Senate bill 5465, Seventy-first Congress, third session, entitled, A bill to amend section 586c of the act entitled 'An act to amend subchapter 1 of chapter 18 of the Code of Laws for the District of Columbia relating to degreeconferring institutions,' approved March 2, 1929,” which you referred to them for report as to the merits of the bill and the propriety of its passage.

Neither the Commissioners of the District of Columbia nor the Board of Education have any objection to the passage of the proposed bill, and the commissioners therefore recommend favorable action thereon. Very truly yours,

L. H. REICHELDERFER, President Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia. In compliance with paragraph 2a of Rule XIII of the rules of the House of Representatives, changes in existing law are shown as follows: The section of existing law proposed to be amended is in Roman type and the proviso added is shown in italics.

Sec. 586c. Application for the license referred to in the preceding section shall be in writing upon forms prepared under the direction of the Board of Education, and shall be filed with the secretary of the said board, whose duty it shall be, in case the institution so licensed is incorporated under the laws of the District of Columbia, to forward a copy of said license to the recorder of deeds for the Dis

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