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exceed $8 a day. In every case, except travel by air and travel on Government transports, where reimbursement of traveling expenses is authorized for personnel of the Army, there is a provision that a per diem may be paid in lieu of reimbursement. All civilian officers and employees of the Government are given the alternative of reimbursement of expenses or a per diem.

Under the present law travel allowances of flying cadets are the same as for enlisted men of the Army. Where long flights are involved this amount is inadequate for flying cadets. In the air maneuvers, planned for this spring, considerable cross-country fly ng will be required for flying cadets. The act of July 11, 1919, authorizes payment of actual and necessary expenses only to officers of the Army and contract surgeons when traveling by air on duty without troops. This amendment authorizes payment to members of the services concerned including officers, warrant officers, contract surgeons, enlisted men, flying cadets, and members of the Nurse Corps.

The report of the Senate committee carrying an explanation of the measure as well as the letter from the Secretary of War is as follows:

(Senate Report No. 1412, Seventy-first Congress, third session)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to which was referred the bill (S. 17) to amend further section 12 of “An act to readjust the pay and allowances of the commissioned and enlisted personnel of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Coast and Geodetic Survey, and Public Health Service," approved June 10, 1922, as amended, so as to authorize the allowance of actual necessary expenses of per diem in lieu thereof to service personnel for air travel on duty without troops, having considered the same reports favorably thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

This legislation is suggested by the Secretary of War, and his letter to the chairman of the Senate Committee on Military Affairs, dated March 30, 1929, is attached hereto and made a part of this report as follows:

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 30, 1929. Hon. David A. REED, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

United States Senate. DEAR SENATOR REED: The following draft of a bill is submitted with the request that it be introduced in the Senate and enacted into law: "A BILL To amend further section 12 of an act to readjust the pay and allowances of the commissioned and enlisted personnel of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Coast and Geodetic Survey, and Public Health Service," approved June 10, 1922, as amended, so as to authorize the allowance of actual necessary expenses or per diem in lieu thereof to service personnel for air travel on duty without troops

"Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the first paragraph of section 12 of 'An act to readjust the pay and allowances of the commissioned and enlisted personnel of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Coast and Geodetic Survey, and Public Health Service,' approved June 10, 1922, as amended by the act of June 1, 1926 (44 Stat. L., p. 680; title 37, U. S. C., p. 2069, sec. 20), be and the same is hereby further amended by adding thereto the following proviso, to wit: Provided, That for travel by air under competent orders on duty without troops, under regulations to be prescribed respectively by the heads of the departments concerned, members (including officers, warrant officers, contract surgeons, enlisted men, Aying cadets, and members of the Nurse Corps) of the services mentioned in the title of this act, and of the legally constituted reserves of suid services while on active duty, and of the National Guard while in Federal service or while participating in exercises or performing duties under sections 92, 94, 97 or 99 of the national defense act, shall, in lieu of mileage or other travel allowances, be allowed and paid their actual and necessary traveling expenses not to exceed $8 per day, or, in lieu thereof, per diem allowances at rates not to exceed $6 per day.

"SEC. 2. That the proviso in 'An act_making appropriations for the support of the Army for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, and for other purposes', approved July 11, 1919, authorizing payment of actual and necessary expenses only to officers of the Army and contract surgeons when traveling by air on duty without troops (41 Stat. L., p. 109; title 10, U. S. C., p. 197, sec. 750), and all other laws and parts of laws in so far as the same are in conflict with this act, are hereby repealed, but nothing herein shall be construed to repeal or modify the provisions of section of 'An act authorizing the construction, repair, and preservation of certain public works on rivers and harbors, and for other purposes,' approved March 3, 1925 (43 Stat. L., p. 1190; title 34, U. S. C., p. 1141, sec. 895).”

The present law provides for reimbursement of actual travel expenses at not to exceed $8 a day for travel by air under competent orders on duty without troops. The purpose of the bill is to extend the law so as to permit per diem allowances at rates not to exceed $6 per day, in lieu of reimbursement of actual travel expenses at not to exceed $8 a day.

In every case, with two exceptions, where reimbursement of traveling expenses is authorized for personnel of the Army there is a provision that a per diem may be paid in lieu of reimbursement. The exceptions are those of travel by air, and travel on Government transports. All civilian officers and employees of the Government are given the alternative of reimbursement of expenses or a per diem. Officers of the Army repeatedly claim that for one reason or another they are unable to obtain reimbursement of legitimate and necessary expenses incurred by them. The enactment of the proposed bill would afford considerable relief.

A draft of the proposed bill has been submitted to the several services mentioned in the joint pay act who state that they are in accord with the object of the proposed bill.

The annual cost to the War Department is estimated at $30,000.

If any additional information from the War Department is desired, I shall be pleased to furnish it.

If the Committee on Military Affairs wishes to have hearings upon the proposed legislation, the following-named officer is designated to appear before your committee: Maj. Gen. James E. Fechet, Chief of the Air Corps.

The proposed legislation has been submitted to the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, who advises that it is not in conflict with the financial program of the President.

A similar letter has been addressed to the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives. Sincerely yours,

James W. Good, Secretary of War. One point not brought out in the foregoing letter from the War Department is that the travel allowances of flying cadets under existing laws are the same as for enlisted men of the Army, which are inadequate to cover expenses while engaged in long flights.

War Department plans for training of flying cadets at the Air Corps Primary Flying School next spring involve air maneuvers which will require considerable cross-country flying by the cadets. Existing travel allowances for flying cadets are entirely inadequate to cover their expenses under conditions incident to long fights, and the War Department is especially desirous of having this measure enacted in time to provide for the expenses of the flying cadets during the coming maneuvers.

0

AWARD OF GOOD-CONDUCT MEDAL TO ENLISTED MEN

OF THE ARMY

FEBRUARY 18, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. COCHRAN of Pennsylvania, from the Committee on Military

Affairs, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 95]

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 95) authorizing good-conduct medal award to enlisted men of the Army, introduced by Mr. James, having considered the same report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

This is a measure to authorize the award of a good-conduct medal to all enlisted men of the Army who, upon completing three years of service, are recommended by their commanding officers for exemplary behavior, efficiency, and fidelity. It also authorizes a suitable bar or device to denote each subsequent period of three years' honorable service.

Such an award would have a beneficial effect on the morale of the enlisted men, who would regard with pride the possession of the medal. The medal would be an inducement to good conduct and would be a visible mark of distinction to the recipient.

The letter of the War Department recommending that this measure be enacted is as follows:

APRIL 9, 1929. Hon. W. FRANK JAMES, Acting Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. JAMES: I submit the following draft of legislation which I request be introduced in the House of Representatives and enacted into law:

"A BILL Authorizing good-conduct medal award to enlisted men of the Army "Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of War, under such regulations as he may prescribe, be, and he is hereby, authorized to award, but not in the name of Congress, a good-conduct medal, of appropriate design, with accompanying ribbon, to all enlisted men of the Army who, upon completing three years of honorable service, are recommended by their commanding officers for exemplary behavior, efficiency, and fidelity, and a suitable bar or device to denote each subsequent period of three years' honorable service.

“Sec. 2. Such sum as may be necessary is hereby authorized to be appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of designing, manufacturing, and supplying the medals, ribbons, bars, or other devices hereinbefore provided for, and the Secretary of War is hereby authorized to employ, under any appropriation which may be made for such purpose, the service of an artist for the design of the medal, without reference to the provisions of the classification act of March 4, 1923."

I favor the passage of the bill for the following reasons:

I believe it would have a beneficial effect from a morale and disciplinary point of view. The soldier would probably regard with pride the possession of the medal, and it would therefore serve as an inducement to good conduct. It would be a visible mark of distinction to the recipient.

It is estimated that a suitable medal could be provided at a cost of about 65 cents, and that the initial cost of the bill if enacted into law would be about $11,250. Thereafter the yearly cost would approximate $9,750.

A bill (H. R. 13402) similar in import, was introduced in the Seventieth Congress but failed of enactment.

additional information from the War Department is desired, I shall be pleased to furnish it. Should hearings be held upon the proposed legislation, suitable witnesses will be designated to appear.

The proposed legislation has been submitted to the Director of the Bureau of the Budget who advises that it is not in conflict with the financial program of the President.

A similar letter has been addressed to the Chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs of the Senate. Šincerely yours,

JAMES W. Good, Secretary of War. O

If an

AMEND THE WORLD WAR VETERANS' ACT, 1924, AS

AMENDED

FEBRUARY 18, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. SWICK, from the Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 17116)

The Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 17116) to amend the World War veterans' act, 1924, as amended, having had the same under consideration, reports it back to the House with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

In general, this bill provides a monthly allowance for widows and children, and dependent parents of 65 years of age or over, of honorably discharged ex-service men of the World War who entered the service prior to November 11, 1918, and served 90 days or more during the World War and who died of disabilities not acquired in the service.

The rates provided are as follows:

Widow and one child, $26 per month, with $6 for each additional child.

No widow but one child, $20 per month, with $6 for each additional child.

Dependent mother or father of 65 years of age or over, $15 per month; both, $20 per month.

Various proposals of wide range looking to the relief of widows, children, and parents of deceased World War veterans have been submitted to your committee, and after very careful consideration of the entire subject, and particularly the history of the granting of similar pensions to dependents of veterans of the Civil and Spanish-American Wars, the bill herein reported was approved.

The first act passed for the benefit of widows and children of veterans of the Civil War was enacted June 27, 1890, 25 years after the close of that war. The first act granting similar benefits to dependents of ex-service men of the Spanish-American War was enacted July 16, 1918, 16 years after the close of that war. When it is considered

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