Page images
PDF
EPUB

buildings, and $8,700 for investigating methods of improving the lasting qualities of paint and finishes on wood.

BUREAU OF CHEMISTRY AND SOILS

Nos. 74 and 76: Appropriates $40,000, as proposed by the Senate, instead of $30,000, as proposed by the House, for the establishment of a field laboratory for naval stores research work in the South; strikes out the Senate increase of $224 for under-average salary increases, and inserts the words “owned by the United States or," with respect to the site for the laboratory.

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY

No. 82, Argentine ant control: Appropriates $15,000, instead of $6,380, as proposed by the House, and $20,000, as proposed by the Senate.

No. 83, Mexican bean beetle: Retains the Senate appropriation of $5,000 for investigations in the control of the Mexican bean beetle in the dry sections of New Mexico.

No. 84, tobacco moth: Retains the Senate appropriation of $10,000 for investigation of the tobacco moth.

BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY

No. 87: Inserts the word "than," inadvertently omitted.

BUREAU OF PUBLIC ROADS

No. 91: Inserts a semicolon.

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

No. 95, forestry studies in Europe: Strikes out the Senate appropriation of $12,500 for expenses of a forester to study forest-land utilization and other forestry matters in Europe, and amends the bill by making a corresponding reduction in the allotment for collecting and disseminating information relative to the world supply of and need for American agricultural products, etc.

No. 96, market inspection of canned fruits: Retains the Senate appropriation of $30,000 for the inauguration of a market inspection service on canned fruits.

No. 97, market news service: Inserts the word “tobacco.No. 98, market news service: Retains the Senate appropriations of $13,500 for establishment of a market news service on livestock at Louisville, Ky., $2,600 for extension of leased wire service on livestock to Ogden, Utah, $30,000 for inauguration of a market news service on tobacco, and $20,000 for establishment of a market news service on livestock at Casper, Wyo.

PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

No. 112, European corn borer: Retains the Senate increase of $210,000 for prevention of the spread of the European corn borer.

SOIL EROSION INVESTIGATIONS No. 129: Provides an increase of $50,000, instead of $100,000, as proposed by the Senate, for soil erosion investigations, and proposes an amendment to the bill adjusting the amount to be allotted for salaries in the District of Columbia.

IN DISAGREEMENT

The committee of conference have not agreed with respect to the following amendments:

No. 130: Reenacting the “Joint resolution for the relief of farmers in the storm and/or drought stricken areas of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Ohio, Oklahoma, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana, New Mexico, and Missouri,” approved March 3, 1930, making the same applicable to the crop year of 1931 with respect to the States of Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, and appropriating the funds collected from the loans of 1930 in the latter States for the same purposes, for the crop year of 1931, in such States. No. 131: The total of the bill.

L. J. DICKINSON,
Rob. G. SIMMONS,
John W. SUMMERS,
J. P. BUCHANAN,

John N. SANDLIN,
Managers on the part of the House.

[ocr errors]

TO EXCUSE CERTAIN PERSONS FROM RESIDENCE UPON HOMESTEAD LANDS DURING 1929 AND 1930 IN THE DROUGHTSTRICKEN AREAS

FEBRUARY 17, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Evans, of Montana, from the Committee on the Public Lands,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 5439]

The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred the bill (S. 5439) to excuse certain persons from residence upon homestead lands during 1929 and 1930 in the drought-stricken areas, hav- • ing considered the same, recommend that it do pass with the following amendment:

Line 11, strike out everything after the comma and insert in lieu thereof the following: and said entries shall not be open to contests or protests because of such absences.

The bill provides that any homestead settler or entryman who, during the calendar years 1929 and 1930, found it necessary to leave his homestead to seek employment in order to obtain food and other necessaries of life for himself, family, and work stock, because of serious drought conditions causing total or partial failure of crops, may, upon filing with the register proof of such conditions in the form of a corroborated affidavit, be excused from residence upon his homestead during all or part of the calendar years 1929 and 1930, and because of such absences these entries are not subject to contests or protests.

The attitude of the Secretary of the Interior is expressed in a letter transmitting a memorandum of the Commissioner of the General Land Office.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, January 20, 1931. Hon. Don B. COLTON, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN. In response to your request of January 14 for a report on H. R. 15554, which is a bill to excuse certain persons from residence

upon homestead lands during 1929 and 1930 in the drought-stricken areas, I transmit herewith a memorandum on the subject that has been submitted by Commissioner Moore, of the General Land Office. After a review of the proposed measure, I agree with Mr. Moore. Very truly yours,

Ray LYMAN WILBUR, Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

Washington, January 17, 1931. H. R. 15554, to excuse certain persons from residence on homestead lands during 1929 and 1930 in the drought-stricken areas, provides that any homestead settler or entryman who, during the calendar years 1929 and 1930, found it necessary to leave his homestead to seek employment in order to obtain food and other necessaries of life for himself, family, and work stock because of serious drought conditions causing total or partial failure of crops, may, upon filing with the register proof of such conditions in the form of a corroborated affidavit, be excused from residence upon his homestead during all or part of the calendar years 1929 and 1930, and in the making of final proof upon such entry absence granted shall be counted and construed as constructive residence by said homesteader.

The bill is substantially similar to a provision carried in the act making appropriations for the Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, approved July 24, 1919 (41 Stat. 234-271), with the exception that the act last mentioned was restricted to the calendar year 1919, or the current homestead year having its principal part in 1919.

The large areas of public lands subject to homestead entry are situated in localities having scant or only moderate rainfalls, and there is perhaps never a growing season during which drought in some section does not cause a partial or total crop failure. This condition is recognized by the general act of March 2, 1889 (25 Stat. 854), which authorizes a leave of absence for one year where partial or total crop failure prevents the settler from securing support for himself and family from the lands settled upon. The settler, bowever, in such cases is not credited with constructive residence.

I do not know of any general drought conditions during the year 1929 that would warrant granting a leave of absence with credit for constructive residence.

There is no reason whatever for including the year 1929 in the provisions of the bill, and I recommend that all reference to that year be stricken therefrom if Congress decides to act favorably on this bill.

A homesteader is not subject to contest for absences due to causes mentioned by said act of March 2, 1889, and while as stated the time absent under leaves granted pursuant to said act must be made up. The act of June 6, 1912 (37 Štat. 123), under which homestead entries are made allows the homesteader to be absent for one or two periods aggregating not more than five months in each residence year and permits such absences to be counted as constructive residence upon the land.

I believe that no additional legislation is necessary but if in the opinion of Congress said act of March 2, 1889, does not afford sufficient relief and the reference to the year 1929 are eliminated from the bill I would interpose no objections to its enactment.

C. C. Moore, Commissioner. It is believed that the objection expressed in this communication is overcome by the committee amendment.

[ocr errors]

CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDING AT COROZAL,

CANAL ZONE

FEBRUARY 17, 1931.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. McSwain, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9303]

The Committee on Military Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 9303) to authorize funds for the construction of a building at Corozal, Canal Zone, having considered the same, report thereon with the recommendation that it do pass.

The necessity for this legislation is explained fully in the letter of the War Department requesting the legislation, and that letter is therefore made a part of this report, as follows:

WAR DEPARTMENT, January 27, 1930. The SPEAKER, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

DEAR MR. SPEAKER: There is inclosed the draft of a bill to authorize funds for the construction of a building at Corozal, Canal Zone, which the War department presents for the consideration of the Congress with a view to its enactment into law.

The applicable provisions of existing law on this subject appear in the act approved May 26, 1928 (Public 518, 70th Congress) and the War Department appropriation act, fiscal year 1930, approved February 28, 1929 (Public 843, 70th Cong.).

The necessity for the proposed legislation is that since the appropriation was made for the construction of the radio, parachute, and armament building at Albrook Field it has been decided that in order to secure the most satisfactory and economical operating arrangement to consolidate the Albrook Field transmitting station with the departmental headquarters station in a new building to be located at Corozal with a view to using remote control for the transmitters for each activity. A further reason for locating the station at Corozal rather than at Albrook Field is the elimination of the flying hazard constituted by the radio towers which form a part of the installation. By a simple electrical connection it will also be possible to operate the transmitters at Corozal by remote control from France Field, thus affording a valuable reserve in case of any accident to the transmitting station at France Field.

It is estimated that it will cost $5,000 to construct this building, and by using $2,500 of the unexpended balances from the appropriations mentioned in the bill, it will be possible to effect this construction without the necessity for a new appropriation. Sincerely yours,

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War. O

« PreviousContinue »