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The court of appeals, while holding that his case against the Egyptian Government was admissible, proceeded, without warrant and without allowing the appellent to be heard in court, to judge the case upon grounds other than those set out in the appeal and held that Mr. Salem's suit against the Egyptian Government had no basis in fact. The decision by the Mixed Court of Appeals is so at variance with the regulations of the law and with equity that in the opinion of the department it amounts to a gross denial of justice to an American citizen.

Mr. Salem states that in maintaining himself through the years necessary to pursue these suits through the courts of Egypt, he has been forced to mortgage all of his property; that some of the properties have been sold to satisfy mortgages and that his last remaining piece of property is now under forcelosure procedure and that when this is gone he will have been stripped of all his possessions.

Following an earnest effort by this Government through diplomatic correspondence to obtain payment of an indemnity in behalf of Mr. Salem for the injuries which he received over a period of years from the Egyptian Government, the Egyptian Foreign Office in a note of March 20, 1930, informed the American minister at Cairo that the Government of Egypt would agree to the arbitration of this claim. The protocol providing for such arbitration in Vienna bears date of January 20, 1931.

It is understood that each government shall pay its own expenses in conducting the presentation of the claim and one-half of the common expenses of the arbitration.

It is estimated that the probable expense to the Government of the United States will be approximately $52,000.

It is recommended that you submit to the Congress a request for an authorization for an appropriation in that amount to admit of the prosecution of the Salem claim to final settlement, and to that end I inclose for your consideration a draft of a proposed message to Congress. Respectfully submitted.

H, L. STIMSON. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 24, 1931.

TO AMEND THE IMMIGRATION ACT OF 1917

FEBRUARY 16, 1931.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. JOHNSON of Washington, from the committee of conference,

submitted the following

CONFERENCE REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 9803]

The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 9803) to amend the fourth proviso to section 24 of the immigration act of 1917, as amended, having met, after full and free conference have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows:

That the House recede from its disagreement to all the amendments of the Senate, and agree to the same.

ALBERT JOHNSON,
T. A. JENKINS,

S. RUTHERFORD,
Managers on the part of the House.

HIRAM W. JOHNSON,
DAVID A. REED,

WM. J. HARRIS,
Managers on the part of the Senate.

STATEMENT OF THE MANAGERS ON THE PART OF THE HOUSE

The managers on the part of the House at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the bill (H. R. 9803) to amend the fourth proviso to section 24 of the immigration act of 1917, as amended, submit the following statement in explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon by the conferees and recommended in the accompanying conference report:

The fourth proviso of section 24 of the immigration act of 1917, as amended, provides for payment of traveling expenses of inspectors or other employees of the Immigration Service when ordered to perform duty in a foreign country or transferred from one station to another in a foreign country including, in the discretion of the Secretary of Labor, the expense of transferring wives and dependent minor children and not over 5,000 pounds of household effects and other personal property. The House bill extended this provision to apply to inspectors and other officers and employees of the Immigration Service transferred from one station to another in the United States. The House bill also provided for the payment of the expenses of transporting the remains of inspectors and other employees of the Immigration Service who die while in or in transit to a foreign country in the discharge of their official duties, to their former homes in the United States for interment.

The Senate amendments include within the original provisions of the portion of the 1917 act referred to as well as the broadened provisions of the House bill, officers and employees of the Naturalization Bureau and Naturalization Service; and the House recedes on all three amendments.

ALBERT JOHNSON,
T. A. JENKINS,

S. RUTHERFORD,

Managers on the part of the House. 2

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1

TO SUBMIT TO COURT OF CLAIMS THE CLAIMS OF PILLÁGER

BANDS OF CHIPPEWA INDIANS OF MINNESOTA

FEBRUARY 16, 1931.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. LEAVITT, from the committee of conference submitted the

following

CONFERENCE REPORT

[To accompany S. 4051) · The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two

authorizHouses on the amendments of the House to the bill (S. 406. pi the two ing the Pillager Bands of Chippewa Indians, residing in the State of Minnesota, to submit claims to the Court of Claims, having met, after full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows: That the House recede from its amendment numbered 2.

That the Senate recede from its disagreement to the amendments of the House numbered 1 and 3; and agree to the same.

Scott LEAVITT,
W. H. SPROUL,

JOHN M. EVANS,
Managers on the part of the Ilouse.

LYNN J. FRAZIER,
Thos. D. SCHALL,
HENRY F. ASHURST,

. Managers on the part of the Senate.

STATEMENT OF THE MANAGERS ON THE PART OF THE HOUSE

The managers on the part of the House at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the House to the bill (S. 4051) authorizing the Pillager Bands of Chippewa Indians, residing in the State of Minnesota, to submit claims to the Court of Claims, submit the following written statement explaining the effect of the action agreed on by the conference committee and submitted in the accompanying conference report:

The House made three amendments to this bill, the first inserting the language which has become standard in jurisdictional bills allowing the United States to plead and be given credit for all sums, including gratuities, paid to or expended for the benefit of the Indians; the second, to reduce the maximum of attorneys' fees from 10 per cent to 5 per cent; and the third, having to do with the disposition of the funds which might be recovered.

The Senate agrees to the first and third amendments of the House. The House recedes from its second amendment, restoring the 10 per cent maximum limitation on attorney's fees. The 10 per cent maximum is that which has usually been inserted in bills of this kind, and the grounds upon which the change was proposed in the House committee were withdrawn upon further study by the member making the suggestion.

Scott LEAVITT.
W. H. SPROUL.

John M. EVANS, 2

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