Page images
PDF
EPUB

.AS

1943

SEVENTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS

ANDREW J. MAY, Kentucky, Chairman R. EWING THOMASON, Texas

WALTER G. ANDREWS, New York MATTHEW J. MERRITT, New York

DEWEY SHORT, Missouri JOHN M. COSTELLO, California

LESLIE C. ARENDS, Illinois OVERTON BROOKS, Louisiana

CHARLES E. CLASON, Massachusetts JOHN J. SPARKMAN, Alabama

J. PARNELL THOMAS, New Jersey PAUL J. KILDAY, Texas

PAUL W. SHAFER, Michigan CARL T. DURHAM, North Carolina

THOMAS E. MARTIN, Iowa CLIFFORD DAVIS, Tennessee

CHARLES H. ELSTON, Ohio E.C. GATHINGS, Arkansas

FOREST A. HARNESS, Indiana JOHN EDWARD SHERIDAN, Pennsylvania IVOR D. FENTON, Pennsylvania ROBERT L. F. SIKES, Florida

J. LEROY JOHNSON, California PHILIP J. PHILBIN, Massachusetts

CLARE BOOTHE LUCE, Connecticut PAUL STEWART, Oklahoma

ANTHONY J. DIMOND, Alaska
VOLIVAR PAGAN, Puerto Rico

JOSEPH R. FARRINGTON, Hawaii

JULIA WATTERSON, Clerk
II

CONTENTS

Statement of

Page

Hon. Howard W. Smith, Member of Congress from Virginia.

3-6

Mr. John D. Battle, executive secretary, National Coal Association.. 6-10

Edward R. Burke, president, Southern Coal Producers Association -- 11-22

Heath S. Clark, president, Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Co.-

31-52

Walter Gordon Merritt, attorney--

52-59

C. E. Wilson, president, General Motors Corporation.

61-87

Clarence B. Randall, vice president, Inland Steel Co.

87-90

Edward E. Butler, executive vice president, Vinco Corporation. 90-92

R. J. Goldie, vice president, Timken-Detroit Axle Co.

93-98

C. C. Carlton, vice president, Motor Wheel Corporation.

98-118

M. B. Linquist, Murray Corporation of America -

118-123

J. C. Argetsinger, Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co.

123-126

Robert H. Keys.

126

C. R. Barton, vice president, National Supply Co.

127-130

J. A. Voss, director of industrial relations, Republic Steel Corpora-

tion.

130-146

E. F. Blank, director of personnel relations, Jones & Laughlin Steel

Corporation.

146-161

Joseph M. Larkin, vice president, Bethlehem Steel Co

161-172

Eugene McAuliffe, president, the Union Pacific Coal Co.-

172-174

National Lumber Manufacturers Association...

175-176

J. Handly Wright, executive vice president, Associated Industries of

Alabama..

176-178

Dr. J. E. Walters, vice president, Revere Copper & Brass Co. 179-197

Guy W. Vaughan, president, Curtiss-Wright Aircraft Co---- 197-201

Hon. H. P. Fulmer, Member of Congress from South Carolina. 203-226

Ross R. Johnston, secretary--

227-229

Address by Donaldson Brown, vice chairman of General Motors

Corporation...

229-235

Richard Maize, secretary of mines, Department of Mines of Pennsyl-

vania.

235-240

Hon. James W. Wadsworth, Member of Congress from New York - 240-298

Lee Pressman, general counsel, Congress of Industrial Organiza-

tions.

299-327

Walter M. Nelson, general counsel, Foreman's Association

327-331

Kenneth Diller, foreman, General Motors Diesel Engine Division.- 331-341

William Stafford, foreman, Timken-Detroit Axle Co..

342-356

Walter M. Nelson, attorney

356-359

William Sanders, foreman, Hudson Motor Co.

359-368

Walter M. Nelson, attorney-

368-373

W. Allen Nelson, president of the Detroit Chapter of Ford Motor Co. 373–378

Mr. Milo J. Warner, past national commander, the American Legion. 379–409

Mrs. Doris Corwith, past national president, the American Legion

Auxiliary -

409-427

H. Gerrish Smith, president, Shipbuilders' Council of America. 429-448

Richard T. Frenkensteen, United Auto Workers, Congress of Industrial

Organizations.

448-480

A. C. Horrocks, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.

480-487

W. Allen Nelson (resumed).

489-500

Frank Elliott, secretary-treasurer, Chrysler Chapter Foreman's Asso-

ciation.

501-505

Robert Turnbull

, secretary-treasurer, Packard Chapter Foreman's

Association

505-515

Hon. Robert P. Patterson, Under Secretary of War:-

517-548
Ernest L. Bell, executive secretary citizens' comm'ttee for National

War Service Act----

548-573

Statement of Continued.

Page

Alton E. Roth, War Labor Board ---

573-591

Admiral Emory S. Land, Chairman, Maritime Commission.. 593-608

Arthur L. Williston, industrial engineer--

608-618

Grenville Clark, attorney --

618-639

John McAlpine, president, Mine Officials Union of America. 641-664

Walter McNally, president, International Union of the American

Foreman's Unions.

665-676

Decision and dissenting opinion of National Labor Relations Board. 699-704

J. G. Luhrsen, executive secretary-treasurer, Railway Labor Execu-

tives' Association --

706-727

John T. Corbett, national legislative representative, Brotherhood of

Locomotive Engineers.

727

Samuel Krimsley, general counsel, Mine Officials Union of America. 739-757

Charles R. Ferguson, international field representative, Mine Officials

Union of America

757-760

Albert E. Conradis, Southern States Industrial Council...

760-775

Lewis G. Hines, national legislative representative, American Federa-

tion of Labor.

775-790

Martin H. Miller, national legislative representative, Brotherhood of

Railroad Trainmen..

791-813

T. F. Flynn, international representative, United Steel Workers of

America on behalf of Van A. Bittner..

813-817

Donald Henderson, general president, United Cannery, Agricultural,

Packing and Allied Workers of America, Congress of Industrial

Organizations.

817-831

Alice Balmer, Washington representative, United Office and Profes-

sional Workers of America -

831-837

Ernest L. Bell (resumed).

839-856

Dr. Walton P. Cole, pastor, Second Church of Boston..

856-871

Otis A. Pendergras, foreman, Delco-Remy Division of General

Motors.--

871-876

Jack Byrd, Cadillac Division of General Motors_

876-879

George P. McNear, Jr., president, T. P. & W. Railroad.

881-897

Harry LaViers, president, Coal Operators' Association, Paintsville,

Ку.

897-901

Mrs. Cecil Broy, Washington, D. C.-

901-903

Lee C. Gunther, president, Southern Appalachian Coal Operators'

Association.

903-907

R. H. Nicholas, chief mine inspector, Pittsburgh Coal Co.--

907-913

J. S. Fink, mine foreman, New River Coal Co....

913-914

Arthur J. O'Dea, Franklin G. Chapin, Jr., Anthony Meyer, Jr. 917-918

Hon. William M. Colmer, Member of Congress from Mississippi. 919-921

Mrs. Agnes Waters, Mothers Association.

921-941

Mrs. Catherine P. Brown, Blue Star Mothers..

942-944

Hon. Paul V. McNutt, Chairman, War Manpower Commission.. 947–1041

Joseph B. Eastman, Director, Office of Defense Transportation;

accompanied by Otto S. Beyer, Director, Division of Transport

Personnel

1043-1068

FULL UTILIZATION OF MANPOWER

THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 1943

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE OF MILITARY AFFAIRS,

Washington, D.C. The committee met at 10:30 a. m., pursuant to call, Hon. Andrew J. May (chairman)

presiding: The CHAIRMAN. The committee will come to order.

Gentlemen, this meeting of the committee has been called for the purpose of starting hearings on H. R. 2239, a bill to amend the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 and to provide further for the successful prosecution of the war by prohibiting acts interfering with the full utilization of manpower.

The bill is as follows:

[H, R. 2239, 78th Cong., 1st sess.) A BILL To amend the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 and to provide further

for the successful prosecution of the war by prohibiting acts interfering with the full utilization of manpower Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

DECLARATION OF POLICY AND INTENT OF CONGRESS

SECTION 1. (a), The Congress hereby declares that in view of the critical nature of the present war and in justice to those in the armed forces of the United States, it is necessary to provide further for the comprehensive, orderly, and effective utilization of the manpower of the Nation in support of the war effort.

(b) The Congress further declares, as the general principle governing such utilization, that an obligation rests upon every person to render such personal service in aid of the war effort as he or she may be deemed best fitted to perform.

(c) The Congress further declares that it is essential that those charged with the duty of managing and directing the industrial enterprises of the country in mining, agriculture, manufacture, construction, and distribution shall have, and be protected in the exercise of, adequate authority to insure uninterrupted service by those employed in such undertakings, and to prevent the useless waste of existing manpower.

SEC. 2. Section 5E of the Selective Service and Training Act of 1940 is amended by inserting at the end thereof the following proviso: "Provided, That none of the provisions of this subsection relating to deferment from service shall apply to any person who violates any of the following provisions of this Act, and every employer shall on or before the 10th day of March, June, September, and December of each year report to the appropriate selective service local board the name of each employee subject to the jurisdiction of each local board who has failed to comply with the following provisions of this Act."

SEC. 3. Until the expiration of -- days from the date on which the President proclaims that hostilities in the present war have ceased, any rules, practices, policies, or requirements of any labor organization or group of employees, or any provision of any contract, agreement, or understanding to which a labor organization is a party, which

1

(1) prescribes, or has the effect of prescribing, the minimum number of employees to be employed in any work, project, or employment; or

(2) prescribes, or has the effect of prescribing, the period or manner of training or apprenticeship as a condition of eligibility for employment on any particular work, project, or employment; or

(3) prescribes, or has the effect of prescribing, in cases where there is a reduction in the amount of, or in the time required to perform, any particular work, that compensation be paid as if such reduction had not taken place; or

(4) prescribes, or has the effect of prescribing, the the kind of tools or equipment which the members of such organization are permitted to use, or otherwise prohibits its members from using, or from working on any work, project, or employment on which there is used, any specified labor saving devices; or

(5) requires, or has the effect of requiring, by reason of one or more individuals not members of a labor organization having been employed for any work, that there also be employed one or more individuals who are members of such labor organization for the performance of the same work to be present while such work is being performed; or

(6) in any other manner interferes with the full utilization of the Nation's

manpower in the present war, are hereby declared void and of no effect, and the enforcement or application of such rules, practices, policies, or requirements of any labor organization, and provisions of any contract or agreement to which any labor organization is a party, or any attempt to enforce or apply such rules, practices, policies, or requirements of any labor organization, and provisions of any contract of agreement to which any labor organization is a party, are hereby declared to be unlawful.

SEC. 4. Every contractor engaged in work connected with the prosecution of the war shall have the responsibility for taking any necessary action hereunder, including the duty to report promptly any such rules, practices, policies, or requirements, or their attempted enforcement or application, to the appropriate contracting agency of the Government, or to his prime contractor, if he is not himself a prime contractor. In the discharge of his obligations to the Government every contractor shall be responsible for achieving and maintaining maximum efficiency and continuity of operations, and most effective use of available manpower, and shall have authority to take such lawful disciplinary measures within his plant or among his employees as may be necessary to insure such maximum efficiency and continuity of operation. He shall be responsible for acts of his executive, administrative, professional, or supervisory employees within the scope of their employment, and such employees shall not be eligible to membership in any labor organization engaging in collective bargaining with the contractor, nor shall such contractor be required to engage in collective bargaining with any labor organization, including any of such employees in its membership.

SEC. 5. Any concerted action, or threats, by any persons whatsoever, designed to coerce any contractor to deal collectively with a labor organization, including such executive, administrative, professional, or supervisory employees in its membership, shall be unlawful and punishable hereunder.

SEO. 6. The term "contractor" as used herein shall include any person, firm, or corporation producing, processing, or supplying any article or service to the United States Government or to any agency thereof, or to any other person, firm, or corporation engaged in supplying such articles or services to the Government.

SEC. 7. Any violation of this Act shall be punishable by a fine of not more than $1,000 or imprisonment for a period of not more than one year, or both, in the discretion of the court.

SEC. 8. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with the provisions of this Act are hereby suspended to the extent of such conflict for the period in which this Act shall be in force.

This bill was introduced by Judge Smith, a Representative from the State of Virginia, and referred to this committeee by the Speaker. As I understand the bill, it both affects the question of manpower and the utilization of manpower and, as well, probably goes to the extent of dealing with acts of interference with production within the industries of the country.

« PreviousContinue »