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7. Conflicting goals of American foreign, agricultural, transportation, economic and social policies should be rationally reconciled at the outset of trade negotiations rather than—as appears to have been the case in the Russian

Grain transactions-permitting one set of priorities to predominate without adequate consideration of other priorities and policies.

The Subcommittee, therefore, recommends that a high-ranking gov: ernment official with an overview and understanding of the overall economic impact of large commodity export transactions, such as the President's Special Representative for Trade Negotiations, be charged with the responsibility for coordinating Federal participation and oversight in such large transactions in the future. Such an official would

have the authority to command the cooperation of officials in all relevant government departments and agencies.

It is further recommended that, in future large agricultural sales, such an individual would head a task force comprised of representatives of all government departments, bureaus and agencies which regulate important elements of the nation's economy. Such a task force would plan for the sales and draw up the kind of contingency plans required to safeguard the nation against unexpected and undesired developments.

8. The Subcommittee recommends that the U.S. Agriculture Department, in conjunction with the Council of Economic Advisers, prepare and submit to the Congress by June 1, 1975, five-year projections of United States demand and supply of all grains. These reports should be revised annually. They would be designed to alert government officials, corporate firms, and private citizens alike to projected domestic needs and to enable the Federal Government to plan a rational agricul. tural policy. Production of grains could then more closely reflect domestic and foreign demand as well as the need for disaster relief surpluses.

The following Senators, who were Members of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations at the time of the hearings, have approved this report: Henry M. Jackson

Walter D. Huddleston John L. McClellan

Charles H. Percy Sam J. Ervin, Jr.

Jacob K. Javits Abraham Ribicoff

Edward J. Gurney James B. Allen

Senator William B. Saxbe, who was a member of the subcommittee at the time of the hearings, was sworn in as Attorney General of the United States on January 4, 1974, and took no part in the preparation of this report.

The Members of the Committee on Government Operations, except those who were members of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations at the time of the hearings, did not sit in on the hearings on which the above report was prepared. Under these circumstances, they have taken no part in the preparation and submission of the report except to authorize its filing as a report made by the subcommittee.

X. APPENDIX

1972 GRAIN SALES TO THE SOVIET UNION

Date: Company: Type of grain

Metric tons

Bushels

July 5, 1972: Continental: U.S.A. yellow corn.
July 5, 1972: Continental: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
July 5, 1972: Continental: U.S.A. soft white wheat.
July 10, 1972: Cargill: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
July 10, 1972: Dreyfus: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
July 11, 1972: Continental: All origins, durum wheat.
July 11, 1972: Cook: U.S.A. hard winter wheat..
July 20, 1972: Continental: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
July 20, 1972: Continental: U.S.A. soft white wheat.
July 20, 1972: Garnac: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
Aug. 1, 1972: Continental: U.S.A. yellow corn.
Aug. 1, 1972: Continental: North American barley-
Aug 1, 1972: Continental: U.S.A. grain sorghums.
Aug. 1, 1972: Dreyfus: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
Aug 2, 1972: Garnac: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
Aug. 2, 1972: Bunge: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
Aug 4, 1972: Cook: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
Aug 4, 1972: Cook: U.S.A. soybeans....
Aug. 9, 1972: Cargill: U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
Summary of sales by type of grain:

U.S.A. hard winter wheat.
U.S.A. soft white wheat.
All origins, durum wheat.
U.S.A. yellow corn..
North American barley.
V.S.A. grain sorghums.
U.S.A. soybeans.

4,500,000
3,650,000

350,000
1,000,000

750,000
500,000
600,000
850,000
150,000

200.000
1,750,000

100,000

100,000
1,500,000

350,000
600,000

300,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
10, 800,000

500,000

500,000 6,250,000

100,000

100,000 1,000,000

171, 167, 125 134, 114,505 12, 860, 295 36, 743, 700 27, 557, 775 18, 371, 850 22,046, 220 31, 232, 145 5,511, 555 7, 348, 740 68, 894, 437 4, 592, 962 3,936, 825 55, 115, 550 12, 860, 295 22,046, 220 11, 023, 110 36, 743, 700 36, 743, 700 396, 831, 960

18, 371, 850 18, 371, 850 246,061, 562

4,592, 962 3,936, 825 36, 743, 700

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