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Project listing

Location Type CoSt (thousands)

Alabama: Anniston------------------------------- 200 men------------------------------- $325 California:

Canoga Park---------------------------------- 400 men------------------------------- 490

Petaluma-------------------------------------- 200 men------------------------------- 405 Georgia: Moultrie--------------------------------- 100 men------------------------------- 95 Kentucky: Lexington.----------------------------- 600 men------------------------------- 585 Louisiana: New Orleans--------------------------- 400 men, expanded to 600 men--------- 200 Massachusetts. Lawrence------------------------- 1,000-man special project-------------- 700 Missouri; St. Louis No. 3.------------------------- 1,000 men----------------------------- 810 Ohio: Dayton------------------------------------- 600 men------------------------------- 615 Puerto Rico: San Juan---------------------------- 600 men------------------------------- 7 Wyoming: Cheyenne------------------------------ 100 men------------------------------- 175

Fiscal year 1966, tentative project listing (prior to reorganization)

E8timated cost

(thousands) Projects---------------------------------------------------------- ($8,600) Pesign and planning---------------------------------------------- (600) Available unallocated prior year funds----------------------------- 1,400 Fiscal year 1966 new obligational authority (appropriation request) -- 7, 800 Total fiscal year 1966 program------------------------------- 9, 200 Tentative project listing Rated Location capacity MS (bay) Cost (number (thousands) of men) California: San Francisco--------- 1,000 || 5-bay new center---------------------------- $930 Colorado: Pueblo----------------- 150 1-bay addition to National Guard armory--- 125 Florida: Melbourne-------------- 100 | 1-bay new center---------------------------- 199 Georgia: Atlanta----------------- 600 || 3-bay new center---------------------------- 536 Hawaii: Honolulu---------------- 1,000 5-bay new center---------------------------- 944 Illinois: Chicago----------------------- 1,000 |----- do--------------------------------------- 828 Springfield-------------------- 200 2-bay new center---------------------------- 391 Kentucky: Louisville------------- 1,000 5-bay new center---------------------------- 788 Louisiana: New Orleans---------- 300 2-bay new center---------------------------- 432 Michigan: Ann Arbor------------ 150 | 1-bay, expansion to 200-men----------------- 150 Minnesota: Minneapolis---------- 1,000 5-bay new center---------------------------- 819 New Jersey: Kearny-------------- 1,000 5-bay, rehabilitation------------------------- 516 New Mexico: Carlsbad----------- 100 1-bay new center---------------------------- 173 Pennsylvania: Philadelphia------------------ 1,000 || 5-bay, new, joint, winav Mar.--------------- 648 Pittsburgh.----- --------------- 600 || 3-bay new center---------------------------- 659 Virginia: Newport News--------- 400 ----- do--------------------------------------- 460

SUBCOMMITTEE RECESS

Senator PROxMIRE. The subcommittee will stand in recess until 2:15 this afternoon.

General WRIGHT. Thank you, sir.

(Whereupon, at 12:10 p.m., the subcommittee recessed, to reconvene at 2:15 p.m.)

(AFTERNOON SESSION, 2:15 P.M. MoRDAY, AUGUST 9, 1965)
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

STATEMENTS OF REAR ADM. PETER CORRADI, CEC, CHIEF, BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS; REAR ADM. E. E. GRIMM, DIRECTOR OF BUDGET AND REPORTS, ACCOMPANIED BY CAPT. A. H. COWART, HEAD, MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT BRANCH, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS; COMDR. J. E. WASHBURN, CEC, DIRECTOR, PROGRAM MANAGEMENT, BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS; CAPT. W. N. GINN, DIRECTOR, NAVY INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES, BUREAU OF SHIPS; CAPT. C. M. MacDONALD, ASSISTANT CHIEF FOR FIELD SUPPORT, BUREAU OF NAVAL WEAPONS: COL. S. D. LOW, DIRECTOR, FACILITIES AND SERVICES DIVISION, HEADQUARTERS, MARINE CORPS; ADM. C. D. RIGGS, MC, ASSISTANT CHIEF, BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY, AND CAPT. T. B. OWEN, DIRECTOR, NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

STATEMENT OF THE CHAIRMAN

Senator STENNIS. The subcommittee will please be in order.

Gentlemen, just a brief statement. Some of you were here this morning, I am not sure all of you were.

Now, this is line item consideration of everything in the bill, no abbreviations, no skipping over. But we do have a situation whereby we have just recently, within the last 3 or 4 weeks, been over in hearings, these items, and then we had quite a conference this year on the military authorization bill. We went over a lot of them again. We are here now to do justice to the Navy, as far as money is concerned. We are delighted to have you gentlemen. Do you want to take up some special items? As to prior authorizations first?

INTRODUCTION OF WITNESSES

Captain CowART. Yes, sir. I am Captain Cowart. Admiral Hull is on a trip to southeast Asia and I am representing him during the hearings.

Senator STENNIs. All right, Captain. We are glad to have you here,

Sll".

Captain CowART. Rear Admiral Grimm, on my right, represents the Navy Comptroller. He has a prepared statement that he can make now or submit for the record at your pleasure.

Senator STENNIs. Who else do you have with you?

Captain CowART. You know Admiral Corradi, on my left. He is Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. Senator STENNIs. Yes. We are glad to have you, Admiral.

PREPARED STATEMENT

Captain CowART. I have a prepared statement. It is practically the same as was presented during the authorization bill hearings. This statement I have differs only in the fact that it covers the prior authorization in the amount of $44,045,000, sir.

Senator STENNIS. Suppose we put your statement in the record now, so that the record will show your complete presentation. Then you can emphasize such points as you wish to, Captain, and, of course, we will take up those prior authorization items and your reclamas.

(The statement referred to follows:)

Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, it is an honor for me to appear before this committee to testify on the Navy military contruction program. In the fiscal year 1966 program being presented today, we recommend funding approval in the amount of $340,295,000.

The various line items that will be considered by the committee support one or more of the following Department of Defense programs:

Program III for general purposes forces––––––––––––––––––––––– $158, 977, 000 Program VI for research and development--------------------- 16, 215,000 Program VII for general Support------------------------------- 165, 103,000

Our shore facilities must be continuously updated to meet the problems of the seagoing Navy and help it maintain its readiness to counter the continuing threat to our Nation and our allies—the continuing threat to peace, to react to shifts in the international political scene, to respond to changes in our national policy, and to take the optimum profit from our advancing technology. There are 10 facility classes in this Navy program. They are sponsored by the Chiefs of the Bureaus and Offices of the Navy Department, including the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Marine Corps. I will briefly summarize the content of each facility class. I am prepared to testify later on the individual line items in as much detail as the committee may desire. Bureau of Ships facilities, $26,272,000

As a result of a study of our naval shipyards, we have concluded that a large scale modernization program is long overdue. The objective of this program is to improve fleet readiness by improving the quality and reducing the time and cost of repairing and constructing ships. There is a total of 40 line items in this class, of which 33 items, amounting to $23,283,000 are distributed among our naval shipyards. These items will improve existing shipyard facilities to meet better the overhaul and repair requirements of our modern ships.

Fleet base facilities, $33,880,000

This class includes line items for improvement to naval station facilities that provide direct support to the fleet. Among them are various items for ship berthing as well as items totaling $7,817,000 at seven naval stations for personnel support facilities to improve the living conditions of assigned personnel.

Supply facilities, $1,436,000
This facility class includes three projects, one for POL pipelines at the Naval
Supply Depot, Newport, R.I., one at Naval Supply Center. Oakland, Calif., and

the third for air conditioning the administration building at the Naval Supply
Depot, Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines.
Marine Corps facilities, $20,798,000
This class of facilities includes items inside the continental United States and
on Okinawa. It is fundamental that the Marine Forces must be prepared for
instant deployment to any incipient trouble spot in the world. The proposed
facilities at Camp Lejeune and Camp Pendleton, in the United States, and Camp

Butler on Okinawa, are needed for building up and maintaining the combat readiness of our Marines.

Service school facilities, $54,707,000

The vital ingredient in fleet readiness is the skill of our officers and men. Education and training have always been the means of attaining this skill, and have always been a continuing endless requirement. The technological complexities Of the world today are nowhere so evident as in the equipment in our ships and aircraft—equipment whose value to the Nation depends in the last analysis on the skills of the officers and men who use it. This year we must provide improvements to education facilities for officer personnel at the Naval Academy, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the Officers Candidate School at Newport, R.I. Items are also included to improve the facilities for our enlisted personnel undergoing basic training and more advanced technical training at the Naval Training Centers at Great Lakes, Ill., and San Diego, Calif. Medical facilities, $12,851,000

Good health of our personnel is another essential of fleet readiness. We have included in the program this year a replacement for a portion of the naval hospital at Newport, R.I., a naval dispensary and dental clinic at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and an outpatient clinic at the naval hospital, San Diego, Calif.

Communication facilities, $21,628,000

The facilities in this class are necessary to insure the effectiveness of naval Communications. Communications is an essential tool of command, and to be fully responsive to the comprehensive demands of modern command and control concepts, fleet communications must be rapid, accurate, and reliable. Projects in this class will assist the Navy to implement all its capabilities as an instrument of national power.

Office of Naval Research facilities, $9,895,000
The Office of Naval Research has the responsibility for conducting the basic

Scientific research required to maintain a modern Navy. The line items in this

Class will contribute materially toward this objective.

Yards and docks facilities, $32,317,000

The Bureau of Yards and Docks is responsible for the execution of the Navy's military construction program and for the performance of civil engineering tasks throughout the Shore Establishment.

Naval weapons facilities, $126,511,000

This is the largest of the Navy's facility classes, comprising six groups of air and ordnance activities, each of which supports a particular segment of naval aviation or naval Ordnance. These groups are naval air training, field support of fleet Operations, marine corps air stations, fleet readiness support, research, development, test, and evaluation and overseas support of the fleet. The proposed projects will support five essential tasks: training of pilots and aircrews; improvement of the air striking power of our Operating Forces; improvement of the Ordnance aspects of fleet readiness; progress in air and Ordnance research, development, test, and evaluation programs; and improvement in personnel living conditions. Here are some examples of line items within these groups. The Avionics Training Building at the Naval Air Station, Memphis, Tenn., will provide classroom and laboratory facilities necessary to teach Our airmen to maintain and Operate the new and sophisticated electronic equipment which makes today's aircraft so remarkably versatile and effective. The first increment of the patrol aircraft support facility at the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Fla.. is the first of two increments designed to provide efficient maintenance support for the new and complex P-3 ORION patrol aircraft. Rehabilitation of barracks at the Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, N.C. will provide a proper standard of living for our men there. The line item for the Quality Evaluation Laboratory at the Naval Weapons Station, Concord, Calif., will provide the additional space required for installation of electronic data processing machinery and its personnel. The Quality Evaluation Laboratory will receive reports from the fleet of the various aspects of shipboard weapons systems, its supply maintenance and operation ; analyze and evaluate these reports for the purpose of improving the design, operation, and support of these systems. I am prepared to try to answer any questions you may have.

Senator STENNIs. Did the House give you all you asked for, or not? Captain CowART. No, sir. The House denied funding of certain line items in the total amount of $20,233,000. We have the reclamas that we have given Mr. Rexroad. Senator STENNIs. Captain, at the conclusion of the Navy's testimony on your reclama, please insert in the record your prepared reo statements. Admiral Grimm, you say you have a statement In OW 4 Admiral GRIMM. I have a statement which I will put in the record with your permission, sir. Senator STENNIs. What is the general nature of your statement?

SUMMARY OF REVISED FUNDING PROGRAM

Admiral GRIMM. Just the financial involvement of our request for appropriations, sir.

I am privileged, sir, to appear before this committee for the first time to present a brief summary of the revised funding program.

Senator STENNIS. We need all this in the record and everything, but I don’t believe it is necessary to go over the details of it unless you think so.

Admiral GRIMM. I don’t think so, sir.

Senator STENNIs. All right, Mr. Reporter, you put this in the record for our guidance in the consideration of these items.

(The statement referred to follows:)

STATEMENT OF REAR ADM. EDWARD E. GRIMM, U.S. NAVY

Edward Elias Grimm was born in York, Pa., on December 1, 1910, Son of Walter E. and Mary Edith (Craumer) Grimm. He attended William Penn High School in York, and the Severn School, Severna Park, Md., prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy. He was graduated on June 1, 1933, and commissioned ensign in the U.S. Navy on May 29, 1934. He subsequently advanced in rank, attaining that of rear admiral, to date from January 1, 1964. After receiving his commission in 1934, he joined the U.S.S. Salt Lake City, cruiser, and in March 1935 was assigned to the destroyer Leary. Continuing duty afloat, he was on board the U.S.S. Maryland, battleship, from September 1937 until June 1940, after which he served as assistant communications officer on the Staff of Commander Service Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor. In October 1941 he reported as flag secretary on the Staff of Commander Service Squadron 8, and was attached to that squadron, based at Pearl Harbor, Tero of Hawaii, when the Japanese attacked the naval base there on December 7, 1941. In March 1943 he joined the Staff of the Subordinate Commander Service Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet as assistant ammunition shipment officer in San Francisco, Calif., and in January 1944 reported as navigator of the U.S.S. Birmingham, cruiser. He was awarded the Purple Heart Medal for wounds received as a result of enemy action on October 24, 1944, during the Second Battle of the Philippine Sea. He is also entitled to wear the Navy Unit Commendation awarded the U.S.S. Birmingham for her part in salvage operations after the carrier Princeton had been critically damaged by enemy Japanese action at this same date. Detached from the Birmingham in June 1945, he had several months' duty as executive officer in the Fleet Administrative Office. Boston, Mass., and in October 1945 reported as officer in charge of the Officer Separation Center, Memphis, Tenn. He was assigned in April 1946, as officer in charge and instructor, logistics course at the General Line School, Newport, R.I. He continued to serve in that capacity in Monterey, Calif., when another school was opened there in January 1948 and until September 1949, when he assumed command of the U.S.S. Rupertus. Under his command that destroyer took part

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