Personal Recollections and Observations of General Nelson A. Miles, Embracing a Brief View of the Civil War: Or, From New England to the Golden Gate, and the Story of His Indian Campaigns, with Comments on the Exploration, Development and Progress of Our Great Western Empire

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Werner Company, 1896 - Indians of North America - 590 pages
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This work contains the personal reflections of Nelson A. Miles and focuses on his career as an American military general who served in the American Civil War, the American Indian Wars, and the Spanish-American War.

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Contents

TECUMSEH
109
CHAPTER VIII
121
CREASING THE WILD HORSE
123
CHAPTER IX
136
LEAN BEAR ROUSING THE INDIANS
139
General Hancocks Expedition General Carrs Campaigns Colonel Forsyths Des
145
CAPTAIN JACK
152
CHAPTER XI
156
BEN CLARK
165
The Kiowas and Comanches on the War Path Attack on the Supply Train Scout
172
CAPTAIN R H PRATT
180
Indian Outbreak at the Cimarron Agency On the War Path Troops Ordered
182
Tribes Composing the Dakota Nations Causes Leading to the War of 18767 Sit
192
RED Cloud Sioux CHEF
194
A Subject Much Discussed A Prevailing Erroneous Impression Captain Godfreys
198
GENERAL TERRYS LAST ORDER TO CUSTER
205
RAININTHEFACE
211
CHAPTER XVI
212
YELLOWSTONE KELLEY
217
Preparing for a Winter Campaign Sitting Bull Divides His Forces A Narrow
221
CHIEF GALL
225
MONTANA BLIZZARD
231
CHAPTER XVIII
236
You HAVE HAD YOUR LAST BREAKFAST
237
WHITE BULL AND HORSE ROAD
244
CHAPTER XIX
248
LAME DEER FIRING AT GENERAL MILES
251
THE CRAZY HORSE FIGHT
257
Character of the Nez PercÚs The Wallowa Valley Chief Joseph How the
259
CALLING BACK THE STEAMBOAT
265
CHAPTER XXI
271
CAPTAIN HALE
272
THOSE INDIANS ARE BAD 66
279
CHAPTER XXII
283
CURLEY SOLE SURVIVOR OF Custers Last BATTLE
287
CHAPTER XXIII
294
INDIANS WATCHING THE ENEMYs Camp
298
GIANT GEYSER YELLOWSTONE PARK
304
CHAPTER XXIV
306
FIGHTING OVER THE CAPTURED HERD
307
INDIAN RAIDING PARTY
313
Redeemed Territory Its Vast Area Zones of Emigration Indications of Character
320
MARCHING ON THE STAKED PLAIN
323
SURRENDER OF CHIEF JOSEPH FROM WHERE THE Sun Now STANDS I FIGJIT
331

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Page 372 - Or lose thyself in the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregon, and hears no sound Save his own dashings — yet the dead are there...
Page 95 - SAVAGES we call them, because their manners differ from ours, which we think the perfection of civility; they think the same of theirs. Perhaps if we could examine the manners of different nations with impartiality we should find no people so rude as to be without any rules of politeness, or none so polite as not to have some remains of rudeness.
Page 42 - I will meet you, or will designate officers to meet any officers you may name for the same purpose, at any point agreeable to you, for the purpose of arranging definitely the terms upon which the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia will be received.
Page 42 - General: I received at a late hour your note of to-day. In mine of yesterday I did not intend to propose the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, but to ask the terms of your proposition. To be frank, I do not think the emergency has arisen to call for the surrender of this army...
Page 95 - Indian men, when young, are hunters and warriors; when old, counsellors; for all their government is by the counsel or advice of the sages; there is no force, there are no prisons, no officers to compel obedience, or inflict punishment. Hence they generally study oratory; the best speaker having the most influence.
Page 210 - IN that desolate land and lone, Where the Big Horn and Yellowstone Roar down their mountain path, By their fires the Sioux Chiefs Muttered their woes and griefs And the menace of their wrath. "Revenge!" cried Rain-in-the-Face, " Revenge upon all the race Of the White Chief with yellow hair!
Page 90 - Newenglanders, had been forlorn and wretched heathen ever since their first herding here; and though we know not when or how these Indians first became inhabitants of this mighty continent, yet we may guess that probably the Devil decoyed those miserable salvages hither, in hopes that the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ would never come here to destroy or disturb his absolute empire over them.
Page 113 - You know the cause of our making war. It is known to all white men. They ought to be ashamed of it.
Page 96 - Offer, tho' we decline accepting it; and to show our grateful Sense of it, if the Gentlemen of Virginia will send us a dozen of their Sons, we will take great Care of their Education, instruct them in all we know, and make Men of them.
Page 98 - I may as well go to the meeting too, and I went with him. There stood up a man in black, and began to talk to the people very angrily. I did not understand what he said; but perceiving that he looked much at me, and at Hanson, I imagined...

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