Bases of belief, an examination of Christianity as a divine revelation by the light of recognized facts and principle: in four parts

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Arthur Hall, Virtue, 1853 - Religion - 425 pages
 

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Contents

Connexion between this and the foregoing Part established
159
A Supernatural Seal to Revelation required by the Nature of the Case
163
Miracles must constitute a Part of any complete Manifestation of God
167
No Moral Display of God by Means of a Human Life could be otherwise authenticated
174
Miracles were necessary to the main Purpose of Christianity
185
As an Authentication Supernaturalism is the most readily un derstood and appreciated
188
Adapted to our Love of the Marvellous
191
Universally expected in Connexion with a Revelation
195
Fitted to awaken Attention as well as to produce Belief
198
Incompatibility of Miracles with Gods Character considered
201
Difference between a Miracle and a Process of Nature
204
Natural Antecedents and Sequents connected only by Divine Ordination
207
Law subordinate to Law in the Physical World
210
The obvious Purposes of Physical Laws complied with and furthered by Miracles
211
The highest Ends of Gods Moral Government subserved by Miracles
221
Credibility of MiraclesMr Humes Sophism
226
Miracles of Christianity accordant with its Purpose in Manner and Kind
245
Christian Miracles sustained by Evidence The Resurrection oi Christ
256
Summary of the preceding Observations
274
Concluding Observations
276
10 What our Religious Sense may require of a Record in regard
351
Religious Insight not to be confounded with Intellectual Pro
376
Concluding Survey of the New Testament as a Record
389
Relation of the Old Testament to the New
396
Summary Description of the foregoing Bases of Belief
409

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Page 148 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
Page 190 - Why herein is a marvellous thing, that ye know not from whence he is, and yet he hath opened mine eyes. 31 [Now] we know that God heareth not sinners: but if any man be a worshipper of God, and doeth his will, him he heareth.
Page 77 - For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves. Which show the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the meanwhile accusing, or else excusing one another), in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ according to my gospel.
Page 148 - That which purifies us is trial, and trial is by what is contrary. That virtue therefore which is but a youngling in the contemplation of evil, and knows not the utmost that vice promises to her followers, and rejects it, is but a blank virtue, not a pure ; her whiteness is but an excremental whiteness, which was the reason why our sage and serious poet Spenser, whom I dare be known to think a better teacher than Scotus or Aquinas...
Page 258 - Jesus cried and said, He that believeth on me, believeth not on me, but on him that sent me. And he that seeth me, seeth him that sent me. I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth on me should not abide in darkness.
Page 382 - But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh; but he of the freewoman was by promise. Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar.
Page 148 - He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true warfaring Christian.
Page 148 - ... our sage and serious poet Spenser, whom I dare be known to think a better teacher than Scotus or Aquinas, describing true temperance under the person of Guion, brings him in with his Palmer through the cave of Mammon, and the bower of earthly bliss, that he might see and know, and yet abstain.
Page 190 - Since the world began was it not heard that any man opened the eyes of one that was born blind. If this man were not of God, he could do nothing . They answered and said unto him, Thou wast altogether born in sins, and dost thou teach us?
Page 382 - For this Agar is mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, and is in bondage with her children. But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all.

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