Page images
PDF
EPUB

DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR AND HEALTH, EDUCATION,

AND WELFARE APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1970

HEARINGS

BEFORE A

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE
COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

NINETY-FIRST CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

SUBCOMMITTEE ON DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR AND HEALTH,
EDUCATION, AND WELFARE AND RELATED AGENCIES

DANIEL J. FLOOD, Pennsylvania, Chairman
WILLIAM H. NATCHER, Kentucky

ROBERT MICHEL, Wulinois
NEAL SMITH, Iowa

GARNE

E siRIVBR, Kansas
W. R. HULL, JR., Missouri
BOB CASEY, Texas

to the Subcommittee

ROBERT M. MOYER

, staje AATE T.
REID, Illinok

PART

1.1099

DEPARTMENT

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENTENT

GENERAL PROVISIONS
SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICE
SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
SPECIAL INSTITUTIONS

Printed for the use of the Committee on Appropriations

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1969

30-234 O

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

GEORGE H. MAHON, Texas, Chairman MICHAEL J. KIRWAN, Ohio

FRANK T. BOW, Ohio JAMIE L. WHITTEN, Mississippi

CHARLES R. JONAS, North Carolina GEORGE W. ANDREWS, Alabama

ELFORD A. CEDERBERG, Michigan JOHN J. ROONEY, New York

GLENARI) P. LIPSCOMB, California ROBERT L. F. SIKES, Florida

JOHN J. RHODES, Arizona OTTO E. PASSMAN, Louisiana

WILLIAM E, MINSHALL, Ohio JOE L. EVINS, Tennessee

ROBERT H. MICHEL, Illinois EDWARD P. BOLAND, Massachusetts SILVIO O. CONTE, Massachusetts WILLIAM H. NATCHER, Kentucky

ODIN LANGEN, Minnesota DANIEL J. FLOOD, Pennsylvania

BEN REIFEL, South Dakota TOM STEED, Oklahoma

GLENN R. DAVIS, Wisconsin GEORGE E. SHIPLEY, Illinois

HOWARD W. ROBISON, New York JOHN M. SLACK, West Virginia

GARNER. E. SHRIVER, Kansas JOHN J. FLYNT, JR., Georgia

JOSEPH M. MCDADE, Pennsylvania NEAL SMITH, Iowa

MARK ANDREWS, North Dakota ROBERT N. GIAIMO, Connecticut

LOUIS C. WYMAN, New Hampshire JULIA BUTLER HANSEN, Washington BURT L. TALCOTT, California CHARLES S. JOELSON, New Jersey

CHARLOTTE T. REID, Illinois JOSEPH P. ADDABBO, New York

DONALD W. RIEGLE, JR., Michigan JOHN J. McFALL, California

WENDELL WYATT, Oregon
W. R. HULL, JR., Missouri

JACK EDWARDS, Alabama
JEFFERY COHELAN, California
EDWARD J. PATTEN, New Jersey
CLARENCE D. LONG, Maryland
JOHN O. MARSH, JR., Virginia
SIDNEY R. YATES, Illinois
BOB CASEY, Texas
DAVID PRYOR, Arkansas
FRANK E. EVANS, Colorado

KENNETH SPRANKLE, Clerk and Staff Director
PAUL M. WILSON, A88istant Clerk and Staff Director

SUBCOMMITTEE ON DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR AND HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND

WELFARE AND RELATED AGENCIES

DANIEL J. FLOOD, Pennsylvania, Chairman WILLIAM H. NATCHER, Kentucky

ROBERT H. MICHEL, Illinois NEAL SMITH, Iowa

GARNER E. SHRIVER, Kansas W.R. HULL, JR., Missouri

CHARLOTTE T. REID, Illinois BOB CASEY, Texas

ROBERT M. MOYER, Staff Assistant to the Subcommittee

(II)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1970

TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1969.

SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICE

WITNESSES

MISS MARY E. SWITZER, ADMINISTRATOR, SOCIAL AND REHABILI

TATION SERVICE JOHN D. TWINAME, DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, SOCIAL AND RE

HABILITATION SERVICE JOSEPH H. MEYERS, DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR FOR PROGRAM

POLICY, SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICE STEPHEN P. SIMONDS, COMMISSIONER, ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS

ADMINISTRATION DR. FRANCIS L. LAND, COMMISSIONER, MEDICAL SERVICES ADMIN

ISTRATION JULE M. SUGARMAN, ACTING CHIEF, CHILDREN'S BUREAU DR. ARTHUR J. LESSER, DEPUTY CHIEF, CHILDREN'S BUREAU DR. JAMES F. GARRETT, ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR, OFFICE OF

RESEARCH, DEMONSTRATIONS, AND TRAINING JOSEPH HUNT, COMMISSIONER, REHABILITATION SERVICES AD

MINISTRATION DONALD F. REILLY, ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONER, ADMINISTRATION

ON AGING RANDOLPH W. LEE, DIRECTOR, BUDGET DIVISION, SOCIAL AND

REHABILITATION SERVICE JAMES B. CARDWELL, DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY, BUDGET

Mr. FLOOD. We now have the Social and Rehabilitation Service. Of course, the witness is Miss Mary Switzer, Administrator, of the Social and Rehabilitation Service. Miss Switzer, I see you have a statement. What do you want to do?

Miss SWITZER. I should say, Mr. Chairman, what do you want me to do? This is a fairly long statement. I would prefer not to read it if it is all right with you, but to try to highlight some of the points in it as we go along, if I might have the whole statement put in the record.

Mr. Flood. We will do that. We will also put your biographical sketch in the record. (The biographical sketch and statement follow :)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF PRINCIPAL WITNESS
Name: Miss Mary E. Switzer.
Position : Administrator, Social and Rehabilitation Service.
Birthplace and date: Newton Upper Falls, Mass., February 16, 1900.

(1)

Education: Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass., A.B., 1921.
Experience:

Administrator, Social and Rehabilitation Service since August 1967.
Commissioner of Vocational Rehabilitaiton, 1950 to August 1967.
Assistant to the Administrator of the Federal Security Agency, 1939–1950.
Served in the Treasury Department from 1922 to 1939 in various adminis-

trative posts. Named assistant to the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury

in 1935 in charge of the Public Health Service. Association memberships-Board member of the following organizations :

Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare,

Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass.
Menninger Foundation (since 1944).
Association for the Aid of Crippled Children.
Alexandria, Va., Board of Health.
International Society for Rehabilitation of the Disabled.
World Rehabilitation Fund.
World Federation of Occupational Therapists (advisory fellow).
Women's College of Duke University, Durham, N.C., board of visitors.
President, National Rehabilitation Association, 1960–1961.
President, American Hearing Society, 1961-1963.

World Council, International Society for Rehabilitation of the Disabled. Special awards, citations, or publications :

President's Certificiate of Merit in 1946, the highest award given to a

regular civil service employee. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Distinguished Service

Award, 1956. Albert Lasker Award, 1960. President's Award of the National Rehabilitation Association, 1955. National Civil Service League Career Service Award, 1966. American Pharmaceutical Manufacturer's Association Award, 1954. Gold Key Award of the American Congress of Physical Medicine, and

Rehabilitation, 1964. Scroll of Honor from the National Medical Association, 1964. People to People Program Citation of International Goodwill, 1963. AFL-CIO Community Service Award of Honor, 1966. Award of Merit, International Congress of the Deaf, 1963. Ambrose M. Shotwell Memorial Award, American Association of Workers

for the Blind, 1962. Distinguished Woman of America Award from the Christian College of

Columbia, Mo., 1964.
Who's Who of American Women Citation, 1965.
Honorary degrees have been received from the universities of Duke, Tufts,

Temple, and Boston, from Gallaudet College, Western College for
Women, Adelphi College, Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania,
California College of Medicine, Springfield (Mass.) College, Manhattan-
ville College of the Sacred Heart, New York University, and Smith

College.
Honorary memberships have been conferred by the American Psychiatric

Association, Phi Beta Kappa, American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine, American Physical Therapy Association, Conference of Rehabilita

tion Centers and Facilities, and the Mended Hearts, Inc. Articles which have been published include:

“An NHAJ Interview * * *.” National Hearing Aid Journal, February

1966. "Changing Background of Jobs for the Disabled,” Employment Service

Review, September 1964. “Assessment: Capacity for Useful Living,” Exceptional Children, May

1962. "How Hospitals Can Help the Disabled,” The Modern Hospital, October

1961. "Statement for the Educational Number of the Journal of the American

Medical Association, 1958." “Vocational Rehabilitation in the United States,” International Labour

Review, Geneva, 1958.

“Vocational Rehabilitation-Its Meaning for the Handicapped Person

and Society," Southern Medical Bulletin, March 1967. “Vocational Rehabilitation of the Public Offender," Labor Rehabilitation Report, May 1967.

PREPARED STATEMENT

STATEMENT BY THE ADMINISTRATOR ON PROGRAMS OF THE SOCIAL AND

REHABILITATION SERVICE

Mr. Chairman, members of the committee: I appreciate very much the opportunity to discuss in general the programs of the Social and Rehabilitation Service as reflected in President Nixon's revised 1970 budget request.

ORGANIZATION OF THE SRS

The Social and Rehabilitation Service was organized in August 1967. It brought together under on administration the HEW welfare programs, the Administration on Aging, the Children's Bureau, and the vocational rehabilitation programs. Today, the Social and Rehabilitation Service is the focal point in our Government for attacking many of the financial and social problems that beset the poorest of the poor people, and the most vulnerable groups in our population--the aged, the children and the disabled and the special target groups described by the Secretary. Since the reorganization, the objectives of the SRS have been to focus our resources on these groups so that we can enable as many as possible of the adults to reach their fullest potential to work and become self-supporting, to enable those who cannot or should not work to become more self-sufficient, and to strengthen the family life as a foundation for the normal growth and development of the children. The SRS programs, in total, are serving in the neighborhood of 14 million persons this year. It is a staggering total and one which will increase next year.

For over a year we have been engaged in the difficult task of putting into effect with the States the many changes the welfare program required by the 1967 amendments to the Social Security Act. The repeated visits to us of welfare recipient groups during this time have highlighted the difficult problems which most of those who are receiving welfare face in eking out a living. These and many other contacts have continually reemphasized to me the overriding importance of the SRS objective of trying to break the cycle of dependency for as many people as is humanly possible.

SUMMARY OF REQUEST

The program we are presenting to you for fiscal year 1970 is estimated to cost $8.7 billion, an increase of $1,285 million over the fiscal year 1969 appropriations including proposed supplementals.

49.3 percent of the request is for maintenance payments to needy, the aged,

blind, disabled, and families with dependent children. 29.6 percent is for medical assistance. 8.4 percent is for social services and administration of public assistance 6.5 percent is for rehabilitation. 3.3 percent is for maternal and child health and child welfare. 1.5 percent is for work incentives. 0.4 percent is for mental retardation. 03 percent is for programs for the aging. 0.2 percent is for juvenile delinquency prevention and control, and 0.3 percent is for the salaries and expenses of the social and rehabilitation service.

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE AND MEDICAID Eighty-seren percent of our program, or $7.5 billion, is required for our ograms of maintenance payments, medical assistance and social services for medis persons and for sharing State and local cost of administering these protram< The estimates are based on estimates received from the States in March 1949, modified for certain actions we propose to take.

It should be borne in mind that these estimates are not based on final action by all States on their legislative programs. In addition they are only predictions of the effect of the needs and actions of millions of individuals who may or may not apply for assistance during the course of the year.

« PreviousContinue »