Walpoliana

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B. Smith, 1800 - Anecdotes - 230 pages

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Page 95 - I know from indubitable authority, that his mother, who kept a school, having run in debt on account of an extravagant daughter, would have rotted in jail, if the parents of her scholars had not raised a subscription for her. Her son had too much sentiment to have any feeling. A dead ass was more important to him than a living mother.
Page 24 - Newcastle had fallen into a mistake, to send for him, and read him a lecture. The duke was sent for once, and came when Mr. Pitt was confined to bed by the gout. There was, as usual, no fire in the room ; the day was very chilly, and the duke, as usual, afraid of catching cold. The duke...
Page 196 - ... gentlemen, his friends, they determined to pass the night in the same apartment; and if any noise or apparition disturbed them, to discharge their pistols at either ghost or sound. As spirits- know all things, they were probably aware of these preparations, and not one appeared. But, in the chamber just above, a dreadful rattling of chains was heard ; and the wife and children of the farmer ran to assist their lord. They threw themselves on their knees, begging that he would not visit that terrible...
Page 7 - Caroline fpoke of fhutting up St. James's Park, and converting it into a noble garden for the palace of that name. She afked my father* what it might probably coft ; who replied,
Page 76 - Grub-street thing from the garret. The author, in sheer ignorance, not humour, discoursing of the difficulty of some pursuit, said, that even if a man had as many lives as a cat, nay, as many lives as one Plutarch is said to have had, he could not accomplish it.
Page xxxv - Deffand ; and which ease and attention had rendered so fat that it could hardly move. This was placed beside him on a small sofa ; the tea-kettle, stand, and heater, were brought in, and he drank two or three cups of that liquor out of most rare and precious ancient porcelain of Japan, of a fine white, embossed with large leaves.
Page 2 - Pfttriottfm of Wilkes. Depend upon it, my dear Sir, that "Wilkes was in the pay of France, during the Wilkes and liberty days. Calling one day on the French minifter, I obferved a book on his table, with Wilkes's name in the firft leaf.
Page 96 - Plato is indeed the philofopher of imagination— but is not this faying that he is no philofopher at all ? I have been told that Rolt, who afterwards wrote many books, was in Dublin when that poem appeared.
Page 54 - Atheism I dislike. It is gloomy, uncomfortable ; and, in my eye, unnatural and irrational. It certainly requires more credulity to believe that there is no God, than to believe that there is.
Page 198 - The rogue confessed all his tricks; and was pardoned on paying the arrears due for five years, at the old rent of the land.

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