Wild Sports of the World: A Book of Natural History and Adventure

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Harper & brothers, 1870 - Game and game-birds - 474 pages

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Page 1 - With a full View of the English-Dutch Struggle against Spain, and of the Origin and Destruction of the Spanish Armada. By JOHN LOTHBOP MOTLEY, LL.D., DCL Portraits.
Page 1 - WHYMPER'S ALASKA. Travel and Adventure in the Territory of Alaska, formerly Russian America— now Ceded to the United States— and in various other parts of the North Pacific.
Page 124 - Then the underbrush swayed rapidly just ahead, and presently before us stood an immense male gorilla. He had gone through the jungle on his all-fours ; but when he saw our party he erected himself, and looked us boldly in the face. He stood about a dozen yards from us, and was a sight I think I shall never forget.
Page 1 - SMILES'S HISTORY OF THE HUGUENOTS. The Huguenots: their Settlements, Churches, and Industries in England and Ireland. By SAMUEL SMILES. With an Appendix relating to the Huguenots in America. Crown 8vo, Cloth, $2 00. SMILES'S HUGUENOTS AFTER THE REVOCATION.
Page 124 - The singular noise of the breaking of tree-branches continued. We walked with the greatest care, making no noise at all. The countenances of the men showed...
Page 3 - DRAPER'S INTELLECTUAL DEvELOPMENT OF EUROPE. A History of the Intellectual Development of Europe.
Page 195 - I could not guide her in the slightest, and she continued to splash, and plunge, and blow, and make her circular course, carrying me along with her as if I was a fly on her tail. Finding her tail gave me but a poor hold, as the only means of securing my prey, I took out my knife, and cutting two deep parallel incisions...
Page 4 - KINGLAKE'S CRIMEAN WAR. The Invasion of the Crimea: its Origin, and an Account of its Progress down to the Death of Lord Raglan.
Page 427 - A beautiful meadow, about half a mile wide, enameled with yellow autumnal flowers, stretched for two or three miles along the foot of the hills, bordered on the opposite side by the river, whose banks were fringed with cotton-wood trees, the bright foliage of which refreshed and delighted the eye, after being wearied by the contemplation of monotonous wastes of brown forest.
Page 220 - The man that's strangled by a hair. Fate steals along with silent tread, Found oftenest in what least we dread, Frowns in the storm with angry brow, But in the sunshine strikes the blow.

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