The Life of Benjamin Franklin: Written by Himself. Now First Edited from Original Manuscripts and from His Printed Correspondence and Other Writings, Volume 2

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1884 - Philosophers

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Page 343 - MR. STRAHAN, You are a member of parliament, and one of that majority which has doomed my country to destruction. — You have begun to burn our towns, and murder our people. — Look upon your hands! — They are stained with the blood of your relations ! — You and I were long friends: — You are now my enemy, — and I am • Yours, B. FRANKLIN.
Page 492 - I then came home, and went whistling all over the house, much pleased with my whistle, but disturbing all the family. My brothers, and sisters; and cousins, understanding the bargain I had made, told me I had given four times as much for it as it was worth.
Page 493 - Mistaken man, said I, you are providing pain for yourself, instead of pleasure ; you give too much for your vuhistle. If I see one fond of appearance, or fine clothes, fine houses, fine furniture, fine equipages, all above his fortune, for which he contracts debts, and ends his career in a prison, Alas ! say I, he has paid dear, very dear, for his whistle.
Page 173 - Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Page 228 - To the King's Most Excellent Majesty: Most Gracious Sovereign: We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the...
Page 120 - When those difficult cases occur, they are difficult, chiefly, because, while we have them under consideration, all the reasons pro and con are not present to the mind at the same time ; but sometimes one set present themselves, and at other times another, the first being out of sight.
Page 476 - And over fields where scatter'd hamlets rose, In barren solitary pomp repose? Have we not seen at pleasure's lordly call, The smiling long-frequented village fall? Beheld the duteous son, the sire decay'd, The modest matron, and the blushing maid, Forc'd from their homes, a melancholy train, To traverse climes beyond the western main; Where wild Oswego spreads her swamps around, And Niagara stuns with thund'ring sound?
Page 320 - They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Page 503 - Should peace arrive after another campaign or two, and afford us a little leisure, I should be happy to see your Excellency in Europe, and to accompany you, if my age and strength would permit, in visiting some of its ancient and most famous kingdoms.
Page 360 - We must be unanimous ; there must be no pulling different ways; we must all hang together." "Yes," replied Franklin, "we must indeed all hang together, or most assuredly we shall all hang separately.

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