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issues and to register and vote. Employees are encouraged to vote by being given up to 1 day off without charge to leave in order to register and to vote in States where absentee balloting is not permitted. You have the right to express your opinions on all political subjects and candidates as long as you do not do so in such a manner as to take an active part in political management or political campaigns of a partisan nature. You may make a voluntary campaign contribution to any regularly constituted political organization. (Note restrictions below.) You may display a political sticker on your private automobile, but you should not do so while on duty conducting the public business. You may wear a political badge or button, but here again you should not do so while on duty performing the public business. You may accept appointment to such positions as member of boards of education, school committees, and boards of public libraries if your agency decides the holding of these local offices will not conflict or interfere with the efficient discharge of your Federal duties. If these offices are elective, you may not participate in a partisan political election. You may participate in a nonpartisan local election in which party designation, nomination, and sponsorship are completely absent. You may be a candidate for office in such an election and you may hold the office after election if the head of your agency decides that your holding it will not interfere with your Federal employment. You may petition Congress or any Member of Congress. For example, you may write to your Congressman and tell him how you think he should vote on any issue. You may sign petitions, including nominating petitions, but may not initiate them or canvass for the signature of others if they are identified with partisan political management or campaigns. a You may attend political rallies, and join political clubs, but you cannot take an active part in the conduct of the rally or the operation of the club or act as chairman, officer, committee member, or delegate. You may vote on issues, but you may not speak for or against them.

WHAT EMPLOYEES ARE PROHIBITED FROM DOING

The general prohibition on Federal employees is that they may not take an active part in political management or in political campaigns of a partisan character. These are some of the prohibited activities: You may not be a candidate for nomination or for election to a National or State office. You may run for a community office only as described in the sections What Employees May Do and Exemptions for Certain Communities. You may not solicit others to become candidates for nomination or election to partisan offices. You may not campaign for or against a political party or candidate. You may not use your automobile to transport voters, except members of your immediate family, to the polls. However, riders in regularly scheduled carpools can stop at the polls on the way to or from work. You may not distribute campaign material. You may not march in a political parade. You may not sell tickets for or otherwise actively promote such activities as political dinners. You may not write for publication or publish any article or letter soliciting votes for or against any political party or candidate. You may not solicit or receive any assessment or contribution for any political urpose. p ou may not make a political contribution in a Federal building or to some other employee. WHAT THE PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION ARE

The Civil Service Commission enforces political-activity restrictions for em

F. in competitive positions. The Commission makes investigations and holds earings in cases involving violations. The most severe penalty for violation is

removal and the minimum penalty is suspension without pay for 30 days.

In cases where removal is ordered by the Commission, the employee may not be reemployed in any position the salary of which is paid from the same appropriation as the job from which he was removed.

Employees in excepted positions come under the jurisdiction of their agency head in political-activity matters.

ExEMPTIONS FOR CERTAIN Communiti ES

Special rules apply to the residents of certain communities with large numbers of Federal employees. Any community in the immediate vicinity of Washington, D.C., and any community the majority of whose voters work for the Federal Government, can ask the Civil Service Commission for partial exemption from political-activity restrictions. If the request is granted, Federal employees livin in the community may actively participate in local political management an local political campaigns but they must run as independent candidates and must conduct their campaigns in a nonpartisan manner.

They may run for office, provided that they do not represent a political party or become involved in political management in connection with the campaign of a party candidate. They must not, of course, neglect their official duties in exercising these privileges, and must, if elected or appointed to local office requiring full-time service, resign their Federal positions.

This exemption has already been granted to more than 50 communities, most of them located in the vicinity of Washington, D.C. Any Federal employee who is in doubt as to whether his community has been granted this partial exemption from political-activity restrictions can get the information from the Civil Service Commission, Washington, D.C.

QUESTIons ABout PoliticAL-Activity RESTRICTIONS

If you are uncertain whether a certain action would violate political-activity rules, you should present the matter in writing to the Civil Service Commission, Washington, D.C. You should get a ruling on the matter before engaging in the action, since ignorance of provisions of the law will not excuse you from penalties for violation.

U.S. Civil Service Commission, Washington, D.C.

NOTICE

Employees of the Federal Government occupy positions of public trust and should be responsive to community interest. Registering and voting is a privilege that should be exercised by all citizens.

The Hatch Act guarantees to Federal employees the right to do so free from any interference, persuasion, or official domination. They should be informed as to permissible political activities as well as those restricted by the Act.

THE LAY "I shall be unlawful for any person employed in the executive active part in political management or in political campaigns. All surt persons

branch of the Federal Government, or any agency or department thereof, to use ka txial authorin or influence for the purpose of interfering with an election op aftesting the result thereof. No officer of employee in the executive branch of the Federal Government, or any agency or department thereof, shall take any

shall retain the right to vote as they may choose and to express their opinions on all politocal subjects and candidates ..." (Section 9(a). Ad of August 2. 1949, as amended.)

PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES

PERMITTED ACTIVITIES
REGISTRATION. It is not only permissible but an obligation on all
citizens, including Federal employees, to register and vote.
VOTING The language of the law specifically provides that all Federal
oployees have the nghe to vote as they choose.
EXPRESSION OF OPINIONS. Federal employees have the right to express
polical opinions, but they may not take an active part in political
management or in political campaigns.
ATTENDANCE AT POLITICAL RALLIES, CONVENTIONS, ETC. Fed.
tral employees may attend political rallies and conventions to which the
general public is admitted.
NOMINA TING PETITIONS. Federal employees are permitted to sign
homenatang peritions in support of individuals whom they wish to see
become candidates for ofhce.
CONTRIBUTIONS. It is lawful for Federal employees to make voluntary
contributions to a regularly constituted political organization, provided such
contribution is not made in a Federal building or to some other Federal
emplovee.

Serving on or for any political committee, party, or other similar organization,
or serving as a delegate or alternate to a caucus or party convention.
Soliciting or handling political contributions.
Soliciting sale of or selling political party dinner tickets.
Serving as oficer of political club, as member or officer of any of its com
mittees, addressing such a club on any partisan political matter, or being
active in organizing it.
Serving in connection with preparation for, organizing or conducting a politi
cal meeting or rally, addressing such a meeting on any partisan political
matter, or taking any other active part therein.
Engaging in activity at the polls (at primary or regular elections), such as
soliciting votes, assisting voters to mark ballots, or transporting or helping
to get out the voters on election days.
Acting as recorder, checker, watcher, or challenger of any party or faction.
Serving in any position of election officer in which partisanship or partisan
political management may be shown.
Writing for publication or publishing any letter or article, signed or unsigned,
soliciting vores in favor of or against any political party or candidate.

POLITICAL PICTURES. It is lawful for Federal employees to display political pactures in their homes if they so desire.

BADGES, BUTTONS, AND STICKERS. It is lawful for Federal employees to wear political badges or buttons or to display political stickers on their private automobiles.

Becoming a candidate for nomination or election to office, Federal, State, county, or municipal, which is to be filled in an election in which party candidates are involved, or soliciting others to become candidates for nomination or election to such offices

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS, REFERENDUMS, ETC. Section 18 (5 US.C., 118n) states an exception relating to elections nor specifically identibed with National or State issues or political parties. It reads as follows:

Nothing in the second sentence of sution 9(a) or in the kuand sentence of section 126) of stes Act shall be construed to prevent a penhibit any persa subject to the ponvices of this Act from engaging in any political activity (1) in connection with

elections and the preceding campaign it none of the candidates em be nominated

clerted a set clersion * representing a party any of whose candidates for presu denial cleres recrired votes in the last preceding election at which presidential electors were wlerted, or () in connection with any question which is not specifically identified hany National of State political party. For the purposes of this section, questions relating to constitutional amendments, referendums, approval of municipal ordinances, and others of a similar character, shall not be deemed to be specifically identified with any National or Sune political party,

Distributing campaign literature or material.

Initiating or circulating partisan political nominating petitions.
Engaging in political caucuses, or canvassing a district or soliciting political
support for a party, faction, or candidate.

THE PENALTY FOR VIOLATION OF THE ACT IS REMOVAL OR SUSPENSION WITHOUT

PAY FOR NOT LESS THAN 30 DAYS

for Additional Information Write to: U.S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, Washington, D.C., 20415

POST CONSPICUOUSLY

CSC Form 1981. Morch 1964

NOTICE

Employees of State or local agencies occupying positions subject to the restrictions of the Hatch Act should be informed as to permissible political activities as well as those prohibited by the Act.

THE LAW "No officer or employee of any State or local agency whose principal political management or political campaigas. All such persons shall retain the employment is in connecuon with any activity which is boanced in whole or in right to vote as they may choose and to express their opinions on all political sed past by loans or grants made by the L'nited States or by any Federal agency shall jects and candidates. For the purposes of the second sentence of this subsection, (1) use his oficial authority or influence for the purpose of interfering with an the term 'officer or employee' shall not be construed to include (1) the Governor election or a nomination for office, or affecting the result thereof, or (2) directly or the Lieutenant Governor of any State or any person who is authorized by law or indirectly coerce, attempt to coerce, command, or advise any other such officer to act as Governor, or the mayor of any city; (2) duly elected heads of executive or employee to pay, lend, or contribute any part of his salary or compensation departments of any State er municipality who are not classibed under a State of anything else of value to any party, committee, organization, agency, or person or municipal merit or civil service system. (3) officers holding elecuse ofhces." for political purposes. No such officer or employee shall take any active part in (Section 12(a), Act of August 2, 1939, as amended.)

PERMITTED ACTIVITIES REGISTRATION. It is not only permissible but an obligation on all citizens to register and vote. VOTING. The language of the law specifically provides that all persons subject to the Act have a right to vote as they choose. EXPRESSION OF OPINIONS. All persons subject to the law have a right to express their opinions on all political subjects and candidates, but they may not take an active part in political management or in political campaigns. ATTENDANCE AT POLITICAL RALLIES, CONVENTIONS, ETC. Employees subject to the Act may attend political rallies and conventions to which the general public is admitted. NOMINATING PETITIONS. Employees subject to the Act are permitted to sign nominating petitions in support of individuals whom they wish to see become candidates for office. CONTRIBUTIONS. It is lawful for employees subject to the Act to make voluntary contributions to regularly constituted political organizations. POLITICAL PICTURES. It is lawful for employees subject to the Act to display political pictures in their homes if they so desire. BADGES, BUTTONS, AND STICKERS. It is not unlawful for employees subject to the Act to wear political badges or buttons or display political stickers on their private automobiles. CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS, REFERENDUMS, ETC. Section 18 of the Act (s U.S.C., 1180) states an exception relating to elections not specifically identified with National or State issues or political parties. It reads as follows:

Nothing in the second sentence of section 9(a) or in the second sentence of section 12(a) of this Act shall be construed to prevent or prohibit any person subject to the provisions of this Act from engaging in sny policat activity (1) in connection with wy election and the preceding campaign if none of the candidates is to be nominated or elected at such election as representing a party any of whose candidates for pressdential elector received votes in the last preceding elections which presidential electors were selected, er (2) a connection with any question which is not specifcally identified with any National or State political parts. For the purposes of this section, questions ehting to constitutional amendments, referendums, approval of municipal ordinances, and orbers of a similar character, shall not be deemed to be specifically idenubed with my National or State political party.

REMOVAL MAY BE RECOMMENDED FOR EMPLOYEES VIOLATING THE ACT

For Additional Information Write to: U.S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, Washington D.C. 20415

POST CONSPICUOUSLY

PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES

Serving on or for any political committee, party, or other similar organization,
or serving as a delegate or alternate to a caucus or party convention.
Soliciting or handling political contributions.
Soliciting sale of or selling political party dinner tickets,
Serving as officer of a political club, as member or officer of any of its com-
mittees, addressing such a club on any partisan political matter, or being
active in organizing it.
Serving in connection with preparation for, organizing or conducting a politi-
cal meeting or rally, addressing such a meeting on any partisan politica!
matter, or taking any other active part therein.
Engaging in activity at the polls (ar primary of regular elections), such as
soliciting votes, assisting voters to mark ballors, or transporting or he sing
to get out the soters on election days.
Acting as recorder, checker, watcher, or challenger of any party or faction
Serving in any position of election officer in which partisanship or partisan
political management may be shown.
Writing for publication or publishing any letter or article, signed or unsigned,
soliciting votes in favor of or against any political party or candidate.
Becoming a candidate for nomination or election to office, Federal, State,
county, or municipal, which is to be filled in an election in which party candi-
dates are involved, or soliciting others to become candidates for nomination
or election to such offices.

Distributing campaign literature or material.
Initiating or circulating partisan political nominating petitions.
Engaging in political caucuses, or canvassing a district or soliciting political
support for a party, faction, or candidate.

Note: ACTIVITIES PERMITTED BY THE HATCH ACT MAY-BE
RESTRICTED OR PROHIBITED BY STATE OR LOCAL LAW OR
REGULATION.

CSC Fom 19019. March 1961

INQUIRIES on HATCH Act PRovisions

Senator MAGNUsoN. Members of Congress get constant inquiries and letters, all sorts of communications on this thing and I hope that this is clarified, because the prior Commissioners warned you on what you could not do. That is what it did, it told them what they could not do and then they would interpret that and greatly enlarge upon what they could not do.

Mr. MACY. That is right.

Senator MAGNUson. And rather than allowing them to do certain . they became more restrictive in their interpretation on the

on’ts.

Mr. MACY. That is exactly right.

Senator MAGNUsoN. And we thought that it would be better to have the do's, and then if they want to interpret those a little more, then it would level off.

Senator ALLOTT. Off the record.

(Discussion off the record.)

Mr. MACY. I think that you will find that it is a pretty well balanced poster. It shows that the prohibited activities are so much and the permitted activities are so much.

Senator MAGNUson. Yes. They used to just want to know about the don’ts, and they never had any interest in the do's.

Senator SALTONSTALL. Off the record.

(Discussion off the record.)

Senator MAGNUsoN, All right, thank you very much. It is understood for the record that this is the formal hearing and it may be that you may want to have another session with us after the House gets through with the bill, so we will all know where we all are.

Mr. MACY. Yes, sir. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

(Whereupon, at 10 a.m., Thursday, April 16, 1964, the committee was adjourned, to reconvene subject to call of the Chair.)

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