Glasgow Mechanics' Magazine, and Annals of Philosophy, Volume 1

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W.R. M'Phun., 1824 - Industrial arts

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Page 118 - I seen also under the sun, and it seemed great unto me: there was a little city, and few men within it; and there came a great king against it, and besieged it, and built great bulwarks against it: now there was found in it a poor wise man, and he by his wisdom delivered the city; yet no man remembered that same poor man.
Page 436 - We have said that Mr Watt was the great improver of the steam-engine ; but, in truth, as to all that is admirable in its structure, or vast in its utility, he should rather be described as its inventor. It was by his inventions...
Page 288 - Nicole, do hereby declare that the nature of my said Invention, and the manner in which the same...
Page 436 - It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal before it; draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin and forge anchors, cut steel into ribbons, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Page 252 - ... books, and I learned geometry. By reading I found that there were good books in these two sciences in Latin : I bought a Dictionary, and I learned Latin. I understood also that there were good books of the same kind in French : I bought a dictionary, and I learned French. And this, my lord, is what I have done : it seems to me that we may learn every thing when we know the twenty-four letters of the alphabet.
Page 436 - It has armed the feeble hand of man, in short, with a power to which no limits can be assigned; completed the dominion of mind over the most refractory qualities of matter ; and laid a sure foundation for all those future miracles of mechanic power which are to aid and reward the labours of after generations.
Page 71 - On the 15th of August, 1643, as I stood at my window, I was surprised with a most wonderful delectable vision. The sea that washes the Sicilian shore swelled up and became, for ten miles in length, like a chain of dark mountains ; while the waters near our Calabrian coast grew quite smooth, and in an instant appeared as one clear polished mirror, reclining against the ridge.
Page 160 - For were it not better for a man in a fair room to set up one great light, or branching candlestick of lights, than to go about with a small watch candle into every corner?
Page 71 - In a moment they lost half their height, and bent into arcades, like Roman aqueducts. A long cornice was next formed on the top, and above it rose castles innumerable, all perfectly alike. These soon split into towers, which were shortly after lost in colonnades, then windows, and at last ended in pines, cypresses, and other trees, even and similar. This was the Fata Morgana, which, for twenty-six years, I had thought a mere fable.
Page 360 - This mixture is to be melted to a frit, and is then to be ground to a fine powder, 3 parts of calcined borax being added previously to the grinding.

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