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CABLE 79.-Summary of statistics of institutions for the instruction of the colored race for

1885–86.

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TABLE 79.-Summary of statistics of institutions for the instruction of the colored race for

1883–86-Continued.

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TABLE 80.--Number of schools for the colored race and enrolment in them by institutions,

without reference to States.

Class ot institutions.

Schools. Enrolment.

Public schools.........
Normal schools.
Institutions for secondary instruction........................................
Universities and colleges
Schools of theology.
Schools of law...
Schools of medicino
Schools for the deaf and dumb and the blind

a 18, 794 a 1,048, 659

34 6, 2017 46 9,970 20 5,119

1,297

98

208 9

139

Total

18, , 935

1,071, 607

a There should be added the 661 schools in free States, having an onrolment of 56,142, making total number of colored public schools 19,455, and total enrolment in them 1,104,801. This makes the total number of schools, as far as reported, 19.596, and total number of colored race under instruction in them 1,127,839. The figures for the public schools of free States are from the United States Census of 1880.

VI.-EDUCATION OF THE INDIANS.

The great progress made in the cause of Indian education since the organization of the education division of the Indian Office is shown in the following table, taken from the report of Hon. John B. Riley, Indian school superintendent. This table, as well as the five immediately following, from the same report, does not include tho schools of the five civilized tribes or those of the New York State Indians; the cost is only the amount expended by the Government, and does not include tho amounts contributed by charitable individuals and religious organizations :

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The following is a summary of the statistics of the Government schools supported by general appropriation:

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The following table gives the statistics of the five Government schools for which special appropriations are made by Congress :

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The following is a summary of the statistics of the three schools at which pupils are placed, under appropriations providing for the educatiou of a certain number of pupils, at a specified rate per apnum:

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The following is a summary of the statistics of schools with which the Indian Office entered into contract to educate Indian pupils at a certain per capita per annum:

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TABLE 82. --Summary by States of the statistics of all Indian schools supported in whole or

in part by the Government for the year 1885–86.

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During the year 1885–86 there were 42 boarding and 8 day schools, supported in part by the Government and in part by religious societies. Of this number, 23 boardng and 3 day schools made reports to the Indian school superintendent of the amounts expended by the societies in control, the total being $97,717.

of the schools supported entirely by religious societies, reports were received from 31-29 boarding and 2 day schools. These were supported at a cost of $14,770.

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS. The five independent schools supported by special appropriations, viz, at Carlisle, Pa., Chilocco, Ind. Ter., Genoa, Nebr., Salem, Oreg., and Lawrence, Kans. (the Haskell Institute), have been in a flourishing condition during the year. Their capacity has been increased from 1,170 to 1,250.

The school at Carlisle, under the able management of Capt. R. H. Pratt, has attracted wide attention, and has demonstrated to all who have examined it the practicability of Indian civilization.

In addition to these independent schools there are six supported from the general appropriations, viz, at Albuquerque, N. Mex., Grand Junction, Colo., the Pawnee School, Indian Territory, Fort Hall, Idaho, Fort Stevenson, Dakota, and Fort Luma, Arizona. The three latter were separated from the control of Indian agents and placed under bonded superintendents during the current year.

“That the Indian may be civilized and made a self-supporting, intelligent citizen," says Superintendent Riley, “has been fully demonstrated. * In every instance where a uniform course of just dealing has been pursued for a series of years, their progress has been even greater than could reasonably have been expected. It has beeu but a few years since it was necessary to use compulsory measures to induce them to send their children to school; now, although the facilities have been increased fivefold in as many years, the demand for school accommodations is greater than can be furnished with the appropriation made by Congress at its last session. It must be borne in mind that it has been less than five years since any extended, organized effort has been made to educate their children, and the number who have tinished the course of instruction and returned to their homes is insignificant when compared with the whole. The result of training the 12,000 children now in school will only be fully realized in the future. The effect of the schools, however, has already been felt on every reservation where they have been established, not only upon the children themselves, but the older Indians have shown a disposition to tako land in severalty, and bave asked for agricultural implements and aid in building houses to such an extent that the Department has been unable to supply the demand.

THE CIVILIZED TRIBES. These tribes embrace the Cherokees, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, located in the southern and eastern part of Indian Territory. Each tribo manages its own affairs under a constitution modelled upon that of the United States. Each tribe has a common-school system, including schools for advanced instruction. The teachers are generally Indians, but text-books in the English language are used. These tribes receive no assistance from the Government in support of their schools. The following information is derived from the report of Robert L. Owen, the representative of the Government there :

Cherokee Nation.--The male and female seminaries of the Cherokees are two large, well-furnished buildings, each costing nearly $100,000, and are of identical plans. They are well supplied with all necessary furniture and school material. The male seminary enrolled 180 during the year, and had an average attendance of 140.

The Cherokee orphan asylum is a similar institution in all material respects. It has on an average about 150 children of both sexes, everything being provided for them gratis.

The common schools are 100 ir number and are scattered through the district in proportion to the population, the neighborhoods furnishing the houses. These houses are of all degrees of finish—from first-class frame buildings, thoroughly equipped with modern appliances, to rude log cabins.

Annual cost:
Male seminary (1885 and 1886)

$16, 696 25 Female seminary (1885 and 1886).

15, 838 10 Orphan asylum.

19, 080 92 Common schools..

36, 082 65 The enrolment of the Cherokee schools was 4,091 ; average attendance 25.6. The common schools include about 10 for Cherokee negroes. There is also a number of private schools from which no complete reports have Teen received. Dr. T. A. Bland, general agent of the National Indian Defense Association,

says that there is not in the Cherokee Nation an Indian man, woman, boy, or girl, of sound mind, fifteen years of age or over, who cannot read and write.

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