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Memoranda to Table 67.

Location.

Name.

Remarks.

Chicago, Ill. (423 W. Roman Catholic School for the Deaf and Damb.. No information received.

12th st.). Baltimore, Md F. Knapp's Institute..

No information receired. New York, N. Y. | Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and No information received. (Station M).

Dumb.
Louisville, Ohio.. St. Joseph's Institute for Deaf-Mutes.

Discontinued.
Baton Rouge, La..... Louisiana Institution for the Education of the No information received.

Deaf and Dumb.

II.-EDUCATION OF THE BLIND.

RIPORTS OF INSTITUTIONS. The College for the Blind, at Vinton, Iowa, presents the unique feature of a literary society modelled and conducted after the manner of similar organizations in the best colleges. Such a body, composed entirely of students in the higher classes, and others over fifteen years of age, and conducted without interference on the part of officers or teachers, has flourished in this institution for seven years.

Aside from the main end in view, the practice in parliamentary usages, the caucus meetings, the clans formed, the little strifes (absurd as it may seem) are like green vines entwining the routine of institution life.

The course of bodily training, pursued in the Perkins Institution for the Blind, at Boston, has been prosecuted with uncommon energy, and no pains have been spared on the part of those in charge to improve and systematize a regular, intelligent, and, to some degree, scientific series of exercises, consisting of free gymnastics, calisthen. ics, and military drill. The favorable results of a strict adherence to this system of physical training are strikingly noticeable in the health and symmetrical growth, as well as in the appearance, gait, manners, and disposition of the pupils.

This institution owns an assortment of forty-six grand, square, and upright pianos, which are in constant use from morning until evening. Also, for the tenth time, the contract has been renewed for another year, whereby the pianos of the public schools of Boston, one hundred and thirty-four in number, have been put in charge of the taners of this institution.

In the Michigan School for the Blind, at Lansing, the general character of the employ. ment afforded the pupils has been very much as indicated formerly, although in the girls' branch there has been a noticeable improvement in the quality of the manu. factured articles. Sewing by hand and machine, both fancy and plain, the bemming of sheets, napkins, and towels, knitting and crocheting, darning and mending, constitute the main features of the girls' work. An exhibit was made at the Central Michigan Fair, at Lansing, in 1886, of the work of this department, together with samples of the work and apparatus of the other departments of the school. The quality of this exhibit excited considerable attention and enlisted a very general interest in the peculiar work which this institution is accomplishing.

The superintendent of the New York Institution for the Blind, at Batavia, in report for 1886, animadverts upon the manifold benefits of the New York point system." It was favorably discussed at the late Convention of the Instructors of the Blind, and has the following advantages: It is simple in construction. Its tangible power adapts it to the tactile capacity of all. It is equally adapted to literature and music. It can be both written and printed. By the aid of the point tablet, it furnishes the measure for outline map-drawing and mathematical operations. With the aid of the type-slate a combination of the musical signs with the numeral signs furnishes : means of writing in harmony and thorough bass,

The literary department of the Ohio Institution for the Blind, at Columbus, offers sit grades of study, as follows: Sub-primary, including kindergarten, primary, in termediate, grammar, sub-senior, and senior. The pupils and studies present the following distribution: Pupils.

Papils Kindergarten

Algebra....
Reading

Rhetoric and composition
Spelling and defining
Writing, both "point" and with pencil

Modern history
Arithmetic

Physics. Geography.

Geometry English grammar

Ancient history United States history

Physiology. Physical geography..

The Wisconsin School for the Blind, at Janesville, graduated in June, 1836, five young women and three young men who had satisfactorily completed the prescribed course of study, and who received the diploma authorized to be bestowed in such cases.

10

18 86 120

English literature.

18

164
59
19
25
34

8 11 13

As an evidence of the practical character of this education, it may be stated that not a few of those who have gone out from the school in years past are maintaining themselves comfortably and honorably through the equipment which it gave them.

TABLE 68.-Summary of statistics of instilutions for the blind.

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TABLE 69.-Statistics of inslitutions for the blind for 1885–86; from replies to inquiries by the United Statis Bureau of Education.

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1 Talladega, Ala. Alabama Institution for the Deaf and 1800 J. H. Johnson

Dumb and the Blind. 2 Berkeley, Cal.

Institntion for the Deaf and Dumb and 1860 the Blind.

Warring Wilkinson, M. A., principal .. 3 Colorado Springs, Colo. Institute for the Education of the Mute 1874 and the Blind.

D. C. Dudley, A. M., principal... 4 St. Augnstine, Fla Floriila Llind and Deaf-Mnte Institute*. 1885 Park Terrell, principal.

Georgia Academy for the Blind. 51 Macon, Ga.

1852

W. D. Wiliams 6/ Jacksonville, 111 Illinois Institution for the Education of 1819 Franklin W. Phillips, M. D. ....

the Blind. 7 Indianapolis, Ind Indiapa Institute for the Education of the 1847 H. B. Jacobs

Blind. 8 Vinton, Iowa Iowa College for the Blind.

1853 T. F. McCune, M. A., principal.
Kansas Institution for the Education of
9 Wyandotte, Kans

1868 George H. Miller
the Blind.
10 Louisville, Ky

Keutucky Institution for the Education 1842 | Benjamin B. Huntoon, A.M.

of the Blind.
11 Baton Rouge, La. Lonisiana Institution for the Blind and

1871 P. Lane
Industrial Home for the Blind.
12 Baltimore, Ma
Maryland Institution for the Instruction

1853 Frederick D. Morrison, M. A
of the Blind.

Maryland School for the Colored Blind 1872 13 Baltimore, Må

Frederick D. Morrison, M. A and Deaf-Mutes.

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 1829 14 Boston, Mass. School for the Blind.

M. Anagnos..... Michigan School for the Blind...

1880 J. F. McElroy, A. M. Lansing, Mic 15

25, 889

37 20

91 j1, 500 90,000 12, 000 168 679 196, 115 30,000 130 1,000 373, 839 | 29,000 160 1,344 310,000 35, 523 85 500 200,000 21, 917 69 1,300 120,000 c37, 310 21 280 11, 000 7,500 63

800 337, 400 €300

38, 656 32, 286 21, 917 21, 603 37,732 33, 674

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18, 900 17, 224

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1867

38 400 20,000
140 2,000 399, 527
247
216 3, 100 500,000

19, 400 19,00
47, 187 48, 148
147, 102 140, 6:4
55, 956 57, 819

53, 936

16 Faribanlt, Minn Minnesota School for the Blind.

1866

J.J. Dow, A.M.. 17 Jackson, Miss

Mississippi Institution for the Education 1852 W. S. Langley, M. D.

of the Blind.* 18 St. Lonis, Mo. (1827 Missouri School for the Blind..

1851 John T. Sibley, A. M., M. D Morgan st.) 19 Nebraska City, Nebr Nebraska Institute for the Blind

1875 J. B. Parmeleo
20 Batavia, N. Y
Now York State Institution for the Blind

Arthur G. Clement
21. New York, NY...... New York Institution for the Blind*. 1831 William B. Wait....
22 Columbus, Ohio

Obio Institution for the Education of the 1837 Charles H. Miller

Blind. 23 Salem, Oreg. Oregon School for the Blind

1883 D. B. Gray.
24 Philadelphia, Pa. Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruc 1833 William Chapin, A. M.

tion of the Blind.
25 Cedar Spring, S.C South Carolina Institution for the Educa- 1855 | Newton F. Walker.

tion of the Deaf and Dumb and the

Blind. 26 Nashville, Tenn...... Tennessee School for the Blind.

1846) Loyal A. Biglowh. 27 Austin, Tex ...... Texas Institution for the Blind.

1858 Frank Rainey, M. D ..
29 Staunton, Va........ Virginia Institution for the Deaf and 1839 Thomas S. Doyle

Dumb and the Blind.
29 Romney, West Va.. West Virginia Institution for the Deaf 1870 John C. Covell, M. A

and Dumb and the Blind.

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Little Rock, Ark,
Raleigh, NC
Janesville, Wis

Arkansas School for the Blind.
North Carolina Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind
Wisconsin Institution for the Education of the Blind.....

No information received.
No information received.
No information received.

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III.-EDUCATION OF THE FEEBLE-MINDED.

MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR THE FEEBLE-MINDED,

The Massachusetts School for the Feeble-Minded, at Sonth Boston, reports an event of the greatest moment placed to the credit of 1826. The parent who now puts his child in this institution, even though unable to pay for its education, is no more pauperized than he would be if he sent his child to any of the public schools in the State. An act of the Legislature, approved by the Governor, restores the school to its rightful place among the educational institutions of the State, from which it had been driven by the unfortunate legislation of 1883.

TABLE 70.-Summary of statistics of schools for feeble-minded youth.

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