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TALLE 30. --Statistical summary of students in institutions for superior instruction, fc.

Continued.

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Table 32 presents the statistics of 204 institutions reporting under the head of superior instruction for women. Thiese had 2,123 instructors and 27,143 students distribinted as follows so far as known: Preparatory 6,688, regular 13,205, normal course 107, special 1,254, advanced 164.

By reference to the column showing productive funds it will be noticed that 13 of the institutions report none and 161 make no report under that head. Of the remainder, 19 report productive funds yielding incomes less than $2,000, 6 realize incomes from their productive funds ranging from $2,000 to $5,000, 1 an income of $8,945, and 4 incomes as follows: Mt. Holyoke, $11,000; Wellesley College, $23,371; Buffalo Female Academy, $24,000; Friends' College, Bryn Mawr, $10,000.

The lack of endowments, which is a serious drawback to this class of schools, seems the more surprising when it is remembered that the patrons of the schools are found largely among the wealthier classes. The facts suggest a want of appreciation on their part of the essentials of a vigorous edncational work, wbich the schools themselves might possibly correct by well-organized efforts. It is noticeable that in the distribution of benefactions for tho year, as shown in Table 84, pago 673, the class of schools under consideration received only $266,285, or a little moro than 4 per cent. of the total reported. Of this amount $124,072 were donated to 4 institutions in Massachusetts, and $100,000 to a college in Ohio, leaving $42,213 to be distributed among the rest of the schools.

About two-thirds of the institutions tabulated are authorized by law to confer degrees; these offer a curriculum closely resembling the ordinary college course; greater option, however, seems to be allowed than in the colleges for men, and, as a rule, modern languages engage more attention than the classics. On the wholo the experience of these schools seenis to indicate that identity of training for the two sexes is not as yet generally demanded in the United States. This fact becomes even more evident upon an examination of the courses of study usually followed by the women students in co-education colleges. There are, of course, notable exceptions to this general tendency. Thus among the superior institutions for women are found colleges like Smith, Wellesley, and Bryn Mawr, where the customary college standards are maintained, and in the co-education colleges women are found rivalling mer in the successful pursuit of the soverest studies. With respect, however, to much of the work represented in the tablo before us, the term “superior" must be taken in a soniewhat different sense from the same term as applied to the intellectual discipline and culture afforded in the leading colleges for men. The recognition of this difference makes it easy to understand why women, who are conscious of superior intellectnal powers, or who foresee the need of an equipment for intellectual work wiich will en.

able them to compete with men for remunerative employment, should press for admission to institutions like Harvard and Columbia. It is interesting to note in this connection that the report of the president of Columbia College for 1886 included in the roll of students 13 matriculated in the collegiate course for women.

The Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass., has made an endeavor, and apparently a successful one, to develop a scheme of instruction specially adapted to the practical needs of women upon whom will devolve the obligations and cares of domestic and social life. It includes careful instruction in anatomy and physiology, accompanied by lectures given by a well-known physician; also lectures on the principles of common law given by a lawyer of note, and lectures, lessons, and practice " in the arts of domestic life, the principles of dress, artistic house furnishing, healthy homes, cooking; marketing, and all the principles which underlie the wisest management of homes.". It is gratifying to know that the effort to establish such courses of instruction and training have met with the cordial approval of patrons and others interested in the cause of woman's education. Surely experiments of this kind, which recognizo the special wants'of a very large and influential class of American women, deserve uo less encouragement than the efforts to secure to them the highest opportunities for general intellectual development and culture.

Statistics in detail of schools for the superior instruction of women will be found in Table 32. The following is a comparative summary of institutions, instructors, and pupils, from 1876 to 1886, inclusive (1883 omitted):

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Number of institutions
Namber of instructors.
Lumber of students

225 220 225 227 227 226 227 236 227 204 2, 404 2, 305 2, 478 | 2, 323 2, 340 2, 211 2,721 2, 989 2, 86: 2, 123 23, 850 23, 022 23, 639 24, 605 25, 780 20,041 28, 726 30, 587 28, 863 27, 143

TABLE 31.-Summary of statistics of institutions for the superior instruction of women.

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15 11 1

413 20

48 17

10 4 1 15

61,351

0397

12, 698 7,500

$51, 368

$475,000 275, 000

$2,500

$1,500

42

58
57

5
86
75

8
27

883
53

35
1, 309

396

9

38 15

536 303

a88
68

6
128
108
a 13
30
17
156
19

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1,575 1, 169

37, 100 32, 774

33
..

3
2
34
5

12

15

84

185 239 860 130

55

8 52

24

8 28

83

4

122 14

1,493

157

18 3 1 5 9

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Alabama
California
Connecticut
Georgia
Illinois.
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan....
Minnesota.
Mississippi
Missouri
Nevada
New Hampshire.
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina.
Ohio....
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessco.
Toxas..
Vermont
Virginia

37

334

339
2, 458

287
6570

6185
61, 780

39

269
01, 223
11,50

100
6444

165

30

9 104 455 609

16 7

442 745

24 19

55

10

11,000 403, 000 51, 500 10, 250 515, 000 17,000

500 15,000
2, 327

50,000
40
15, 150 527, 500 5,000
1,400

70,000 25, 000
28, 900 256, 600 34, 000
59, 218 3,096, 500 1,131, 723
1, 350 50,000 38, 000
1,300

184,000 3, 000
6,050

180, 500
8, 175

530, 500 72,000
300
2, 325

180,000 171, 500
1, 325

160,000
18, 131 319, 182

2, 450
6,150

204, 000 3, 000
9, 600 660, 000 37, 846

400
16, 300 625, 000 750,000
5, 200 73, 000 ), 100
8,700 390, 000 3,000
2,051 67, 500
1, 100 20, 000 16, 000
7, 840 127, 000

3 14 27 1 6 12 39 22

1, 800

70, 020
1, 800 6, 400
4, 600
48,072 208, 355
2, 000

44, 155

19, 175
5, 300 100, 406
90 2, 360

000
25, 200 | 108, 298
180

20, 400
2, 156 23, 973

3
9
13
1
3
3
10
10
11

1
10
0

46 100

8
20
19
165
55
33

6 3

132

57
223

9
27
a 66
a147

9
26
31
204
a82
a 134

13
a 106

61 a124

68

14 a 134

11 30

3

336

3 11 5 5 11

5

43 570 213 203

27 50

3

26 120

14

110
254
508
513
393
146
344

384
1, 140

130

156 1,000

68 48

10

23 13 24 10

38 20 50

3 7 6 6 1 9

62, 049
bi, 295
01, 153

146
1732

6875
b2, 107
0032

288 61, 629

82 331 358 238 80

74

40,000

80 180

85

2
91
77

1,500
6, 200
31, 400
12, 000

1, 200 46, 770

6

2 10

7 82

7 40

000

12

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TABLE 32.— Statistics of institutions for the superior instruction of toomen for

Post-office address.

Name.

President.

2

15

1 Athens, Ala
Athens Female College.

Rev. M. G. Williams
2 Eufala, Ala ....
Union Female College..

A. H. Todd 3 Florence, Ala

Florence Synodical Female Col. Miss S. Collier ..

lege 4 Huntsville, Ala.

Huntsville Female College..... A. B. Jones, LL.D., D. D 5 Huntsville, Ala

Huntsville Female Seminary J.D. Anderson...

(Rotberwood Home). 6 Marion, Ala Judson Femalo Institute.

Robert Frazer 7 Marion, Ala ..

Marion Female Seminary* James D. Wade, A. M.. 8 Talladega, Ala....

Synodical Female Institute. Rev. G. W. Maxson, D.D...., 9 Tuscaloosa, Ala

Alabama Central Female Col. S. B. Foster, A M., and G. G. lege.

Glower, principals. 10 Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Tuscaloosa Female College... Alonzo Hill.. 11 Tuskeegco, Ala.

Alabama Conference Female John Massey

College
12
Los Angeles, Cal.
The Ellis College*,

Rev. John W. Ellis.
13 Mill's Seminary, Cal.. Mill's Seminary and College Rov. C.C. Stratton, D.D
14 San José, Cal.
College of Notre Dame

Sister Mario Cornelia, saporior.. Santa Rosa, Cal.

Santa Rosa Lailies' College. Rev W. A. Finley, A. M., D D 16 | Hartford, Conn.

Hartford Female Seminary Dr. Andrewg... 17 Athens, Ga.. Lucy Cobb Institute

Miss M. Rotberford 18 Covington, Ga

Georgia Methodist Fomale Col. John T. McLaughlin.

lege. 19 Cuthbert, Ga... Andrew Female Collego

Rev. Howard W. Key. 20 Dalton, Ga..... Dalton Femalo College *

John A. Jones, A. M 21 Forsyth, Ga.. Monroo Female College.

Richard T. Asbury, A. N. 22 Gainesville, Ga

Georgia Baptist Seminary for A. W. Van hooso

Young Ladies 23 Gainesville, Ga .... Methodist College for Young Rev. C. B. La Hatte

Ladies. 24 i Griffin, Ga Griffin Female College*,

George G. Butler, A. M. 25 La Grange, Ga...

La Grange Female College.. Rufus W. Smith ..... 26 La Grange, Ga...... Southern Female College.. I. F. Cox 27 Macon, GA Wesleyan Femalo Collego

W.C. Bass, D.D.. 28 Newnan, Ga College Temple

M.P Kellogg, A. M..
29 Roma, Ga...
Rome Female Coileg**

Rev. J. M. M. Caldwell
30
Rome, Ga
Shorter College

L K. Gwaltney, D.D.
31
Thomasville, Ga
Young Female College..

John E Baker, A.M
32 Galesburgh, IU
Knox Seminars

Hon. Newton Bateman, A. M., LL.D. 33 Greenville, III Almira College

James P. Slade 34 'acksonville, III Illinois Female Colego

Rev. W.F. Short. D.D..... 35 Jacksonville, III

Jacksonville Female Avademy. E. F. Bullaril, A N... 86 Knoxville, Ill St. Mary's School..

Rev. C. W. Lethngwell. 37 Lake Forest, III

Ferry Hall, Lake Forest Uni. Rev. Daniel S. Gregory, D.D.

versity. 38 Morgan Park, ni

Chicago Female College Gilbert Thayer, LLD 39 Mt. Carroll, nl Mt. Carroll Seminary

Mrs. Frances A. Wood Shimer.. 40 Rockford, Ill... Rockford Seminary.

Martha Hillard...
Fort Wayne, Ind.. Westminster Seminary for Miss C B. Sharp and Mrs. D. B.
Young Ladius.

Wells.
New Albany, Ind.. De Pauw College for Young Rev. L. M. Albright.

Women. 43 Davenport, Iowa

Immaculate Conception Acad. Sister Mary Gonzaga...

emy. 44 Des Moines, Iowa Callanan College...,

C. R. Pomeroy, D. D... 45 Oswego, Kang College for Young Ladies

Louise Paull. 46 Topeka, Kans Collego of the Sisters of Bethany Rt. Rev. Thomas H. Vail, D. D.,

LL.D 47 Clinton, Ky.. Clinton College

Miss Amanda M. Hicks 48 Danville, Ky

Caldwell and Bell College.. Miss Lottie A. Campbell 49 Georgetown, Ky.

Georgetown Female Seininary.. James J. Ruckor, ILD. 50 Glasgow, Ky Liberty Female College.

E. W. Elroa 51 Harrodsburgh, Ky. Daughters' College....

Joha Aug. Wiliams. * From Report of the Commissioner of Education for year 1884–85. a Rechartered in 1977.

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