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" In raillery assume a gayer air, Discreetly hide your strength, your vigour spare; For ridicule shall frequently prevail, And cut the knot, when graver reasons fail. "
The Life of Thuanus: With Some Account of His Writings, and a Translation of ... - Page 381
by John Collinson - 1807 - 467 pages
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - English language - 1787
...written or eompofed; to contract that round-about method of ex* " Concife your didtion, let your fenfe be clear, " Nor, with a weight of words, fatigue the ear." FRANCIS. preflion, and to lop off thofe ufelefs excref- LE c T. cences which are commonly found in a firft draught....
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Horace

Horace - Latin poetry - 1806 - 453 pages
...elegantly writ. Tis not enough a bursting laugh to raise, And yet even this may well deserve its praise ; Close be your language ; let your sense be clear. Nor with a weight of words fatigue the ear. From grave to jovial you must change with art. How play the critic's, now the poet's part; In raillery...
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Works

Horace - 1807
...enough a bursting laugh to raise, Tci ev'n this talent may deserve its praise: Concise your diction ; let your sense be clear, Nor with a weight of words fatigue the ear. Now change from grave to gay with ready art. Now play the orator's or poet's part; In raillery assume...
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Lectures on rhetoric &c

Hugh Blair - 1820
...vigour and energy when thus retrenched; provided always, that we run not into * " Concise your diction, let your sense be clear, " Nor with a weight of words, fatigue the ear." FRANCIS the extreme of pruning so very close, as to give a hardness and dryness to style. For here, as in all...
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Blair's Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles-lettres

Hugh Blair - English language - 1822 - 144 pages
...sentence where they will make the fullest impression. Q, What is the fourth ? \ * " Concise your diction, let your sense be clear, Nor with a weight of words, fatigue the ear." HORACE A. Make the members of the sentence go on rising in their importance one above another. Q, What...
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The British Poets: Including Translations ...

British poets - English poetry - 1822
...bursting laugh to raise, And yet e'en this may well deserve its praise: Close be your language; Jet your sense be clear, Nor with a weight of words fatigue the ear. From grave to jovial you must change with art, Now play the critic's, now the poet's part; In raillery...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - 1823
...excrescences which are commonly found in a first draught. Here a severe eye should be " Concise your diction, let your sense be clear, Nor with a weight of words fatigue the ear." FRANCIS. employed ; and we shall always find our sentences acquire more vigour and energy when thus retrenched...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres

Hugh Blair - English language - 1824 - 679 pages
...copulatives, relatives, and all the particles employed for transition and connex* " Concise your diction, let your sense be clear, •' Nor with a weight of words fatigue the ear." ion. These little words, but, and, which, whose, where, &.c. are frequently the most important words...
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The journal of the rev. John Wesley, Volume 4

John Wesley - 1827
...opus, ut currat sententia, ncu se Impediat verhis lassas onerantibus aures.' ' Concise your diction, let your sense be clear, Nor with a -weight of words fatigue the ear.' In his Works, we may observe his words are well chosen, being pure, proper to his subject, and precise...
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The Life of the Rev. John Wesley: Founder of the Methodist Societies

Richard Watson - 1831 - 328 pages
...employed much leisure time whilst at college in the study of anatomy and medicine. ' Concise your diction, let your sense be clear, Nor with a weight of words fatigue the ear.' In all his writings his words are well chosen, pure, proper to his subject, and precise in their meaning....
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