Learned Girls and Male Persuasion: Gender and Reading in Roman Love Elegy

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University of California Press, Feb 20, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 368 pages
This study transforms our understanding of Roman love elegy, an important and complex corpus of poetry that flourished in the late first century b.c.e. Sharon L. James reads key poems by Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid for the first time from the perspective of the woman to whom they are addressed—the docta puella, or learned girl, the poet's beloved. By interpreting the poetry not, as has always been done, from the stance of the elite male writers—as plaint and confession—but rather from the viewpoint of the women—thus as persuasion and attempted manipulation—James reveals strategies and substance that no one has listened for before.
 

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Contents

PART II THE MATERIAL GIRLS AND THE ARGUMENTS OF ELEGY OR THE DOCTA PUELLA READS ELEGY
69
PART III PROBLEMS OF GENDER AND GENRE TEXT AND AUDIENCE IN ROMAN LOVE ELEGY
153
Appendix
225
Notes
239
Works Cited
323
General Index
337
Index Locorum
345
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About the author (2003)

Sharon L. James is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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