Brambles and Bay Leaves: Essays on Things Homely and Beautiful

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Groombridge, 1862 - 212 pages
 

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Page 124 - LINES WRITTEN IN EARLY SPRING. I HEARD a thousand blended notes, While in a grove I sate reclined, In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts Bring sad thoughts to the mind. To her fair works did nature link The human soul that through me ran ; And much it grieved my heart to think What man has made of man. Through primrose tufts, in that sweet bower, The periwinkle trailed its wreaths ; And 'tis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathes.
Page 35 - He that at midnight, when the very labourer sleeps securely, should hear, as I have very often, the clear airs, the sweet descants, the natural rising and falling, the doubling and redoubling of her voice, might well be lifted above earth, and say, Lord, what music hast thou provided for the Saints in Heaven, when thou affordest bad men such music on Earth...
Page 18 - And God said, Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so.
Page 225 - Here's flowers for you: Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram ; The marigold, that goes to bed with the sun, And with him rises, weeping; these are flowers Of middle summer, and I think they are given To men of middle age.
Page 24 - My doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew : as the small rain upon the tender herb, and as the showers upon the grass.
Page 134 - The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night And his affections dark as Erebus: Let no such man be trusted.
Page 219 - And they answered the angel of the Lord that stood among the myrtle trees, and said, 'We have walked to and fro through the earth, and, behold, all the earth sitteth still, and is at rest.
Page 176 - This single stick, which you now behold ingloriously lying in that neglected corner, I once knew in a flourishing state in a forest: it was full of sap, full of leaves, and full of boughs: but now, in vain does the busy art of man pretend to vie with nature, by tying that withered bundle of twigs to its sapless trunk...
Page 293 - Joying to hear the birds' sweet harmony, Which therein shrouded from the tempest dread, Seem'd in their song to scorn the cruel sky. Much can they praise the trees so straight and high, The sailing Pine, the Cedar proud and tall, The vine-prop Elm, the Poplar never dry, The builder Oak, sole king of forests all, The Aspen good for staves, the Cypress funeral ; The...
Page 24 - Wherefore if God so clothe the grass of the field, which to day is, and to-morrow is cast into the oven ; shall he not much more clothe you, O ye of little faith ; therefore take no thought saying, What shall we eat ? or what shall we drink?

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