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SEC. 2. That Congress finds and declares that the tidelands, bays and estuaries, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes are rich in a variety of natural, commercial, recreational, esthetic, and other resources of immediate and potential value to the present and future generations of Americans; that many of these areas are in danger of damage or destruction by commercial and industrial development; and that it is the policy of Congress through a system of marine sanctuaries, to preserve, protect, encourage balanced use, and where possible, restore, and make accessible for the benefit of all the people, selected parts of the Nation's natural tidelands, bays and estuaries, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes, which are valuable for sport and commercial fishing, wildlife conservation, outdoor recreation, and scenic beauty.

SEC. 3. (a) In furtherance of this policy, the Secretary of the Interior shall study, investigate, and formulate recommendations on the most feasible and desirable means of establishing portions of the Nation's tidelands, bays and estuaries, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes as marine sanctuaries, including but not liimted to the Santa Barbara Channel, California, seaward to the Channel Islands, and the Georges Bank area adjacent to lower Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

(b) The Secretary shall cooperate and consult with other interested Federal agencies as well as other interested public and private organizations and shall coordinate his studies, to the extent feasible, with all other applicable planning activities related to the areas under consideration.

(c) In conducting the studies, the Secretary shall schedule hearings in areas contiguous to the proposed sanctuary sites, for the purpose of receiving views on the establishment of such marine sanctuaries.

Sec. 4. (a) Until such time as he submits the report required by section 5 of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall not issue or renew any license, permit, or other authorization for the exploration, development, mining, or other removal of any minerals (including gas and oil) from any part of the Outer Continental Shelf under study as a possible marine sanctuary.

(b) During such study period the Secretary is authorized to cooperate with all affected Federal, State, local, and international governments and agencies as well as interested private organizations and international organizations in order that, until the completion of such study, a moratorium on the industrial development of any portion of the tidelands, bays and estuaries, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes, under consideration as a possible marine sanctuary may be agreed upon by such interested parties.

SEC. 5. The Secretary of the Interior shall submit to the Congress through the President within two years after the date of this Act a report of his findings and recommendations, including such legislation as he deems appropriate. The Secretary's report shall contain, but not be limited to, findings with respect to: (1) the sport and commercial fishing, wildlife conservation, recreation, scenic beauty, and marine ecological research values of such tidelands, bays and estuaries, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes; (2) the potential alternative beneficial uses of these waters, taking into consideration mining, agriculture, and transport activities and other public purposes, and the impact of these activities, including pollution, upon these regions; (3) the most effective means for reserving and developing properly these regions without endangering their esthetic and other values set forth in clause (1); (4) the most feasible and desirable means of creating national system of marine sanctuaries.

SEC. 6. The Secretary of the Interior shall consult with the Secretary of State regarding the need for international agreements where potential marine sanctuaries extend into international waters contiguous to the territorial waters of the United States, or lie wholly within international waters.

Sec. 7. For the purposes of this Act :

(a) The term “tidelands, bays and estuaries," means land and waters within the three-mile territorial limit of the United States.

(b) The term “Outer Continental Shelf” means land and waters extending from the three-mile territorial limit out to the two-hundred-meter depth contour.

(c) The term "seaward areas” means land and water contiguous to and extending from the two-hundred-meter depth contour.

SEC. 8. There is to be authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $1,000,000 to carry out this Act.

[H.R. 11812, 90th Cong., first sess.) A BILL To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to study the most feasible and desirable

means of establishing certain portions of the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and Great Lakes of the United States as marine sanctuaries and for other purposes

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this bill shall be cited as “The Marine Sanctuaries Study Act of 1967”.

SEC. 2. That Congress finds and declares that the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes are rich in a variety of natural, commercial, recreational, esthetic, and other resources of immediate and potential value to the present and future generations of Americans ; that many of these areas are in danger of damage or destruction by commercial and industrial development; and that it is the policy of Congress, through a system of marine sanctuaries, to preserve, protect, encourage balanced use, and where possible, restore, and make accessible for the benefit of all the people, selected parts of the Nation's natural tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes, which are valuable for sport and commercial fishing, wildlife conservation, outdoor recreation, and scenic beauty.

SEC. 3. (a) In furtherance of this policy, the Secretary of the Interior shall study, investigate, and formulate recommendations on the most feasible and desirable means of establishing portions of the Nation's tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes as marine sanctuaries, including but not limited to the Plum Island area off the coast of New Hampshire.

(b) The Secretary shall cooperate and consult with other interested Federal agencies as well as other interested public and private organizations and shall coordinate his studies, to the extent feasible, with all other applicable planning activities related to the areas under consideration.

(c) In conducting the studies, the Secretary shall schedule hearings in areas contiguous to the proposed sanctuary sites, for the purposes of receiving views on the establishment of such marine sanctuaries.

SEC. 4. (a) Until such time as he submits the report required by section 5 of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall not issue or renew any license, permit, or other authorization for the exploration, development, mining, or other removal of any minerals (including gas and oil) from any part of the Outer Continental Shelf under study as a possible marine sanctuary.

(b) During such study period the Secretary is authorized to cooperate with all affected Federal, State, local, and international organizations in order that, until the completion of such study, a moratorium on the industrial development of any portion of the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes under consideration as a possible marine sanctuary may be agreed upon by such interested parties.

SEC. 5. The Secretary of the Interior shall submit to the Congress through the President within two years after the date of this Act a report of his findings and recommendations, including such legislation as he deems appropriate. The Secretary's report shall contain, but not be limited to, findings with respect to: (1) the sport and commercial fishing, wildlife conservation, recreation, scenic beauty, and marine ecological research values of such tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes; (2) the potential alternative beneficial uses of these waters, taking into consideration mining, agriculture, and transport activities and other public purposes, and the impact of these activities, including pollution, upon these regions; (3) the most effective means for reserving and developing properly these regions without endangering their esthetic and other values set forth in clause (1); (4) the most feasible and desirable means of creating a national system of marine sanctuaries.

SEC. 6. The Secretary of the Interior shall consult with the Secretary of State regarding the need for international agreements where potential marine sanctuaries extend into international waters contiguous to the territorial waters of the United States, or lie wholly within international waters.

Sec. 7. For the purposes of this Act:

(a) The term “tidelands" means bays, estuaries, land, and waters within the three-mile territorial limit of the United States.

(b) The term “Outer Continental Shelf" means land and waters extending from the three-mile territorial limit out to the two-hundred-meter depth contour. (c) The term “seaward areas” means land and waters contiguous to and extending from the two-hundred-meter depth contour.

SEC. 8. There is to be authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $1,000,000 to carry out this Act.

[H.R. 11868, 90th Cong., first sess.) A BILL To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to study the most feasible and desirable

means of establishing certain portions of the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and Great Lakes of the United States as marine sanctuaries and for other purposes

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this bill shall be cited as “The Marine Sanctuaries Study Act of 1967”.

SEC. 2. That Congress finds and declares that the tidelands, bays and estuaries, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes are rich in a variety of natural, commercial, recreational, esthetic, and other resources of immediate and potential value to the present and future generations of Americans; that many of these areas are in danger of damage or destruction by commercial and industrial development; and that it is the policy of Congress, through a system of marine sanctuaries, to preserve, protect, encourage balanced use, and where possible, restore, and make accessible for the benefit of all the people, selected parts of the Nation's natural tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes, which are valuable for sport and commercial fishing, wildlife conservation, outdoor recreation, and scenic beauty.

SEC. 3. (a) In furtherance of this policy, the Secretary of the Interior shall study, investigate, and formulate recommendations on the most feasible and desirable means of establishing portions of the Nation's tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes 'as marine sanctuaries, including but not limited to the Santa Barbara Channel, California, seaward to the Channel Islands, and the Georges Bank area adjacent to lower Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

(b) The Secretary shall cooperate and consult with other interested Federal agencies as well as other interested public and private organizations and shall coordinate his studies, to the extent feasible, with all other applicable planning activities related to the areas under consideration.

(c) In conducting the studies, the Secretary shall schedule hearings in areas contiguous to the proposed sanctuary sites, for the purpose of receiving views on the establishment of such marine sanctuaries.

SEC. 4. (a) Until such time as he submits the report required by section 5 of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall not issue or renew any license, permit, or other authorization for the exploration, development, mining or other removal of any minerals (including gas and oil) from any part of the Outer Continental Shelf under study as a possible marine sanctuary.

(b) During such study period the Secretary is authorized to cooperate with all affected Federal, State, local and international governments and agencies as well as interested private organizations and international organizations in order that, until the completion of such study, a moratorium on the industrial development of any portion of the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes, under consideration as a possible marine sanctuary may be agreed upon by such interested parties.

Sec. 5. The Secretary of the Interior shall submit to the Congress through the president within two years after the date of this Act a report of his findings and recommendations, including such legislation as he deems appropriate. The Secretary's report shall contain, but not be limited to findings with respect to: (1) the sport and commercial ing, wildlife conservation, recreatio scenic beauty, and marine ecological research values of such tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and lands and waters of the Great Lakes; (2) the potential alternative beneficial uses of these waters, taking into consideration mining, agriculture, and transport activities and other public purposes, and the impact of these actvities, including pollution, upon these regions; (3) the most effective means for reserving and developing properly these regions without endangering their esthetic and other values set forth in clause (1); (4) the most feasible and desirable means of creating a national system of marine sanctuaries.

SEC. 6. The Secretary of the Interior shall consult with the Secretary of State regarding the need for international agreements where potential marine sanctuaries extend into international waters contiguous to the territorial waters of the United States, or lie wholly within international waters.

Sec. 7. For the purposes of this Act :

(a) The term “tidelands,” means bays, estuaries, land, and waters within the three-mile territorial limit of the United States.

(b) The term “Outer Continental Shelf” means land and waters extending from the three-mile territorial limit out to the two hundred meter depth contour.

(c) The term "seaward areas” means land and waters contiguous to and extending from the two hundred meter depth contour.

SEC. 8. There is to be authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $1,000,000 to carry out this Act.

[H.R. 13150, 90th Cong, first sess.) A BILL To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to study the most feasible and desirable

means of establishing certain portions of the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and Great Lakes of the United States as marine sanctuaries and for other purposes

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this bill shall be cited as “The Marine Sanctuaries Study Act of 1967”.

Sec. 2. That Congress finds and declares that the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes are rich in a variety of natural, commercial, recreational, esthetic, and other resources of immediate and potential value to the present and future generations of Americans; that many of these areas are in danger of damage or destruction by commercial and industrial development; and that it is the policy of Congress, through a system of marine sanctuaries, to preserve, protect, encourage balanced use, and where possible, restore, and make accessible for the benefit of all the people, selected parts of the Nation's natural tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes, which are valuable for sport and commercial fishing, wildlife conservation, outdoor recreation, and scenic beauty.

SEC. 3. (a) In furtherance of this policy, the Secretary of the Interior shall study, investigate, and formulate recommendations on the most feasible and desirable means of establishing portions of the Nation's tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes as marine sanctuaries, including but not limited to the Georges Bank area adjacent to lower Cape Cod, Massachusetts, the Point Lobos and Pfeiffer-Big Sur areas of Monterey County, California.

(b) The Secretary shall cooperate and consult with other interested Federal agencies as well as other interested public and private organizations and shall coordinate his studies, to the extent feasible, with all other applicable planning activities related to the areas under consideration.

(c) In conducting the studies, the Secretary shall schedule hearings in areas contiguous to the proposed sanctuary sites, for the purposes of receiving views on the establishment of such marine sanctuaries.

SEC. 4. (a) Until such time as he submits the report required by section 5 of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall not issue or renew any license, permit, or other authorization for the exploration, development, mining, or other removal of any minerals (including gas and oil) from any part of the Outer Continental Shelf under study as a possible marine sanctuary.

(b) During such study period the Secretary is authorized to cooperate with all affected Federal, State, local, and international organizations in order that, until the completion of such study, a moratorium on the industrial development of any portion of the tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes under consideration as a possible marine sanctuary may be agreed upon by such interested parties.

SEC. 5. The Secretary of the Interior shall submit to the Congress through the President within two years after the date of this Act a report of his findings and recommendations, including such legislation as he deems appropriate. The Secretary's report shall contain, but not be limited to findings with respect to : (1) the sport and commercial fishing, wildlife conservation, recreation, scenic beauty, and marine ecological research values of such tidelands, Outer Continental Shelf, seaward areas, and land and waters of the Great Lakes; (2) the potential alternative beneficial uses of these waters, taking into consideration mining, agriculture, and transport activities and other public purposes, and the impact of these activities, including pollution, upon these regions; (3) the most effective means for reserving and developing properly these regions without endangering their esthetic and other values set forth in clause (1); (4) the most feasible and desirable means of creating a national system of marine sanctuaries.

SEC. 6. The Secretary of the Interior shall consult with the Secretary of State regarding the need for international agreements where potential marine sanctuaries extend into international waters contiguous to the territorial waters of the United States, or lie wholly within international waters.

SEC. 7. For the purposes of this Act

(a) The term “tidelands” means bays, estuaries, land, and waters within the three-mile territorial limit of the United States.

(b) The term “Outer Continental Shelf” means land and waters extending from the three-mile territorial limit out to the two-hundred-meter depth contour.

(c) The term "seaward areas” means land and waters contiguous to and extending from the two-hundred-meter depth contour.

SEC. 8. There is to be authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $1,000,000 to carry out this Act.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D.C., April 9, 1968. Hon. EDWARD A. GARMATZ, Chairman, Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: As you asked, here is our report on H.R. 11460, a bill “To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to study the feasible and desirable means of establishing a marine sanctuary in the Santa Barbara Channel, California.”

H.R. 11460 would direct the Secretary of the Interior to study, investigate, and formulate recommendations on the feasible and desirable means of establishing all or part of the Santa Barbara Channel of the State of California in a marine sanctuary. The Secretary would be directed to report his findings and recommendations to Congress through the President in 2 years. He would also be directed to cooperate and consult with other affected agencies and with all other applicable planning activities related to the region.

H.R. 11460 also provides that the report of the Secretary of the Interior would contain, in part, findings with respect to the feasible and desirable means of creating a marine wilderness system as an extension of the basic principles established in the Wilderness Act (78 Stat. 890).

This Department's Forest Service administers the 9.1 million acres of National Forest lands which presently comprise the National Wilderness Preservation System. However, the National Forest System does not encompass the coastal waters of the United States, and we have not studied these areas in carrying out our regular responsibilities. We therefore cannot comment on the suitability of the Santa Barbara Channel and other coastal areas for preservation as a part of a marine wilderness system.

The Secretary of the Interior's report under H.R. 11460 would also include findings with respect to the potential alternative uses of the Santa Barbara Channel and other coastal areas, including agriculture. If H.R. 11460 is enacted, the Department of Agriculture would assist the Department of the Interior in evaluating the agricultural potentials involved.

The provisions of H.R. 11460 would not otherwise affect the responsibilities of this Department, and we defer to the Department of the Interior as for the need for this bill.

The Bureau of the Budget advises that there is no objection to the presentation of this report from the standpoint of the Administration's program. Sincerely yours,

JOHN A. SCHNITTKER,

Acting Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D.C., April 9, 1968. Hon. EDWARD A. GARMATZ, Chairman, Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: As you asked, here is our report on H.R. 11584, H.R. 11812, and H.R. 11868, similar bills "To authorize the Secretary of the Interior

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