The Philosophy of Natural History: Prepared on the Plan, and Retaining Portions, of the Work of William Smellie

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Taggard and Thompson, 1867

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Page 325 - He many times deceives the sportsman, and sends him in search of birds that perhaps are not within miles of him ; but whose notes he exactly imitates : even birds themselves are frequently imposed on by this admirable mimic, and are decoyed by the fancied calls of their mates ; or dive with precipitation into the depth of thickets, at the scream of what they suppose to be the sparrow-hawk.
Page 146 - ... quite conscious of all that was happening. It was like what patients partially under the influence of chloroform describe, who see all the operation but feel not the knife. This singular condition was not the result of any mental process. The shake annihilated fear, and allowed no sense of horror in looking round at the beast. This peculiar state is probably produced in all animals killed by the carnivora; and, if so, is a merciful provision by our benevolent Creator for lessening the pain of...
Page 146 - ... together. Growling horribly close to my ear, he shook me as a terrier dog does a rat. The shock produced a stupor similar to that which seems to be felt by a mouse after the first shake of the cat.
Page 325 - In his domesticated state, when he commences his career of song, it is impossible to stand by uninterested. He whistles for the dog ; Caesar starts up, wags his tail, and runs to meet his master. He squeaks out like a hurt chicken ; and the hen hurries about, with hanging wings and bristled feathers, clucking to protect her injured brood. The barking of the dog, the mewing of the cat, the creaking of a passing wheelbarrow, follow with great truth and rapidity.
Page 146 - It caused a sort of dreaminess, in which there was no sense of pain nor feeling of terror, though quite conscious of all that was happening. It was like what patients partially under the influence of chloroform describe, who see all the operation, but feel not the knife. This singular condition was not the result of any mental process. The shake annihilated fear, and allowed no sense of horror in looking round at the beast.
Page 379 - The days of our years are threescore years and ten ; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labor and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away.
Page 313 - When they attack the leg, the stain of blood upon the stocking extends more than an inch in width. They make their hooked jaws meet at the first stroke, and never quit their hold, but suffer themselves to be pulled away leg by leg, and piece after piece, without the smallest attempt to escape.
Page 310 - ... possible, and generally about the height of the common surface of the ground. It is always nearly in the shape of half an egg, or an obtuse oval, within, and may be supposed to represent a long oven. In the infant state of the colony, it is not above an inch, or...
Page 410 - In this, the first stage of its creation, it was unfit for the residence of living things. It presented nothing but inorganic matter and its laws ; chemical laws governing its elements, physical laws governing its masses. Its temperature was uncertain, unequal, and extreme ; its atmosphere unfit for the support of respiration ; 'ts surface not yet converted into a soil which could supportvegetable life, or, to which this is necessary, animal life.
Page 366 - Huber, furnishes a specimen of these remarkable contests. " If we wish to behold regular armies, war in all its forms, we must visit those forests in which the fallow ants establish their dominion over every insect in their territory. We shall there see populous and rival cities ; regular roads passing from the ant-hill as so many rays from a centre, and frequented by an immense number of inhabitants ; and wars between hordes of the same species, for they are naturally enemies and jealous of the...

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