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The following Discourses, delivered at the Monthly Meetings of the

present Year, are already published.

1.

DR. J. PYE SMITH. On the Principles of Interpretation as applied to the Prophecies

of Holy Scripture. 8vo. 28. 6d.

II.

REV. JOSEPH FLETCHER, A. M. On the Attention due to Unfulfilled Prophecy. 8vo. Is. 6d.

III.

REV. W. ORME.
On the Character of the Present Dispensation. 8vo.

28.

IV.

REV. HENRY FORSTER BURDER, A.M. The Rise, Progress, and Termination of Mohammedism. 8vo. 18. 6d.

ALSO, MAY BE HAD, THE EVIDENCES OF CHRISTIANITY: A Course of Lectures delivered at the Monthly Meetings of the London Congregational Union.—By the Rev. W. Orme, Dr. Collyer, Rev. H. F. Burder, A. M., Stratten, Walford, Dr. J. Pye Smith, Rev. A. Reed, Curwen, Philip, Dr. Winter, Rev. J. Morison, and the Rev. Joseph Fletcher, A. M. One vol. 8vo. 10s. 6d.

THE ADVANTAGES AND DEFICIENCIES OF THE

PROTESTANT REFORMATION: A Sermon delivered at Kensington, before the Monthly Association of Congregational Ministers. By J. P. Dobson. 12mo. 2s. boards.

LONDON:
HOLDSWORTH AND BALL,

18, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD.

.4.1030 THE CHARACTER OF THE PRESENT DISPENSATION

VIEWED IN CONNEXION WITH PROPHECY.

A DISCOURSE

DELIVERED BEFORE THX

MONTHLY ASSOCIATION OF CONGREGATIONAL

MINISTERS AND CHURCHES,

IN THE

MEETING-HOUSE OF THE REV. J. YOCKNEY,

ISLINGTON,

ON THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 1829;

AND PUBLISHED AT THEIR REQUEST.

WITH ADDITIONAL NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

BY WILLIAM ORME.

LONDON:
HOLDS WORTH AND BALL,

18, st. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD.

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A DISCOURSE.

HEBREWs xii. 27, 28.

And this word, Yet once more, signifieth the removing

of those things that are shaken, as of things that are made, that those things which cannot be shaken may remain. Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear.*

THAT “known unto God are all his works from the foundation of the world,” is a truth not more clearly the doctrine of scripture than it will be found to accord with the correct conclusions of human reason. The divine operations of providence indicate, though not perhaps so distinctly as those of creation, a plan, according to which all things are carried on, the tendency and object of which is, to promote the glory of God in connexion with the good of his creatures. Such a plan implies the wisdom and forethought of him who conducts it, and naturally produces on the mind of an attentive observer a deep con

* See Note A.

viction, that its details as well as its general principles must be the result of previous arrangement, and not the effect of chance or of temporary causes. · If these views are correct in their application to those events which involve chiefly the present circumstances of communities and individuals, much more may we believe they will be found to embrace the higher interests of religion and the destinies of eternity. If the divine mind has been exercised in the construction of a scheme whose operations and effects spend themselves in this world; surely that scheme which is but commenced in time, and whose principles and glory eternity will be required to develope, must be regarded as the fruit of Jehovah's highest wisdom, and the disclosure of his eternal councils. The bare idea that such a plan may be liable to change, whether that change shall arise from some after-thought or new discovery on the part of its framer, or from caprice or fickleness in its administration, is a reflection on the divine character, and calculated to induce the most uncomfortable and dreary apprehensions. If changes implying alteration of purpose and plan, adopted to meet unexpected circumstances, or in accommodation to an unforeseen state of things, have already occurred, then they may occur again; and thus the fondest and

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