Page images
PDF
EPUB

PAGE

PAGE

18

Currency inflation-farmers the great

I.
est losers.....

86 International Coinage..........46, 260
Currency and the public debt....... 418 Iron and Steel of Belgium and
Currency and the breadstuffs trade.. 104

France...

8:
Currency, money and political econo-

Iron and Steel, their manufacture... 248
my.....

....180, 269
Currency, Misapprehensions in regard
to...

821 Journal Banking Currency and Fi.

nance.....79, 189, 237, 319, 899, 47)
D.

L.
Debt of Virginia....

166 Labor Congress at Home and Abroad 292
Debt of Louisiana...

106 Lake Superior Copper Mines.... 146
Debt of United States, 160, 230, 286, Lake Sincoe Canal...

404
312, 801, 432 Legal-Tenders and the Supreme
Debt and Finances of New Hamp Court....

210
shire

296 Loans and Discounts Rates Weekly
Debt, &c., of Boston..

808

74, 149, 282, 815, 894, 468
Debt of Missouri...

810 Louisville and Nashville Railroads.. 425
Debt of Teonessee.

811 Louisville, Cincinnati and Lexiogton
Discounts and Loaps, rates of, week-

Railroads...

285
ly........74, 14, 232, 816, 894, 466
Dynamite, the new Blasting Agent.. 251

M.
Memphis and Charleston .... 850

Milwaukee and St. Paul and Milwau-
Eastern Europe, Question..

keo and Prairie du Chien Railroad. 26
Earthquakes io s uth America..... 262 Michigan Central Railroad...

72
Eight Hour Strikes......
91 | Missouri, Debt of......

310
English Colonies and English Trade. 806 Mines of Australia...

464
European War....
190 | Mobile and Ohio Railroad...

94
Exchange, Daily Course of, 79, 184 Money or Currency in relation to the
236, 319, 898, 470 principles of Politi al Economy 180,

26-, 874

Money Market and Factitious icter-
Farmers and an Ioflated Currency.. 86

ference with.....

344
Funding Bill......

154
France and the Spanish Revolution 339

National Foard of Trade ...

40

National Bank returns of each State
Georgia Railroad and Banking Com-

for July

.139-89
pa y, and The Atlantic and West

National Bank reserves. ..212, 430
Point Railroad

265

New York Central Stock Dividends. 207
Georgia railrvads..

267 New Hampshire, Deot and finances
Government securities, prices of each

if..

295
day in New York and London..76,

New Orle os Cotton Statement. 39
15!, 233, 316, 396, 437 New York. Provide ce and Boston
Gold daily, price of.79, 161, 235, 318,

Railroad

392
398, 469 New York State and the prop sed

409
Gold and the prospective premium

division of.
..93, 193, 241 Northampton Forgeries.

lu2
Gold premium, fluctuation in and

406

0.
specie payments....
Great Britain and the United States, Ohio River and Chesapeake Bay.108, 161
trade of

.... 147, 23
Great Britaio statistics.

2 5

P.

Pacific Railroad of Missouri...... 196
H.

Pacitic Railroads and Railroad Pre-
Hay crop and exports

221
gress

365
Hartford and New Havea Railroad. 388 Philadelphia, Wilmingto i an Balti-
Hudson River Bridge....

412
more R ilroad....

142

N.

on......

PAGE

the ...

...... 216

PAGE
Postal Convention between Great Soutwestern Georgia Railroad .... 422

Britain and United States..... 230 South, commercial recuperation in
Presidential Election...
869

289
Specie payments ........

.272, 357
R.
Spanish revolution.

279
Railroad, Milwaukee and St Paul, and Stock, secret issues of

362
Mlwaukee and Prairie du Chien.. 26 Stocks, railroad and earnings 199
Railroad, Micbigan Central...... 72 Stocks and bonds (American) held
Railroad, Mobile and Ohio.

94
in Europe

241
Railroad, Philadelphia, Wilmington Stock Exchaoge sales

.78,
and Baltimore......

142

160, 232, 816, 893, 468
Railroad, Atlantic and Great West Strikes, and the eight-bour move-
ero.
167 ment..

91
Railroad, Pacific Railroad of Missouri 195 St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute
Railroad, Chicago, Rock Island an i Railroad...

218
Pacific...

213 Steel and iron, their manufacture 248
Railroad, South Western Georg a... 422 Steel and iron of Belgium and France 81
Railroad, St. Louis, Alton and Terre
Baute ..

T.
Railroad, Hartford and New Haven. 888
Railroad, Georgia Railroad and Bank.

Telegraph and commerce

106
ing Company and the Atlantic and

Trade, depression of

128
West Point Railroad,..

Trade of Great Britain and the Uni-
265

ted States
Railroad, Louisville and Nashville.. 428

......147, 223, 380
Tennessee debt of.

311
Railroad, Louisville, Cincinnati and
Lexington.....

288

Transportation between seaboard and
the West.

335
Railroad, New York, Providence and
Boston..

Treasury report in full.

483
899
Railroad, Chicago, Burlington and

Tre sury report, comments upon... 420
Quincy.

347
Railroad, Memphis and Charleston.. 350

U.
Railroad, Chicago and Northwestern 362 United States and, Great Britain,
Railroads in Georgia...

267 Trade of....... .147,2 3, 885
Railroad Stock Dividend..... 207 United States Debt, 166, 230, 236,
Railroad Stocks, price of, each month

812, 391, 432
77, 162, 234, 316, 896, 468 United States Government, receipts
Railroad Earnings for month, 169, and expenses. ::

168
199, 268, 317, 330. 42Union Pacific Railroad.

311
Receipts and Expenees of the United
States Government..

168

V.
Reserves of National Banks..

202
Rice Crop for 1868..

807

Virginia-Navigation from the Ohio

to Chesapeake Bay .......108, 161
S.
Virginia State Debt.

165
San Francisco treasure movement
for six months..... ..227, 389

W.
South American earthquakes...... 262 Watering Railroad Stocks.. ... 207
Southern ports, cotton receipts each Wheat, Prices of and trade in, of
week for the year...
810 Great Britain.....

303

ERBATA.- In the November number pages 241 to 284 should be 341, &c. In the
December number from pages 434 to are dated January, 1868, instead of
December, 1868.

[blocks in formation]

ON THE TRADE WITH THE COLORED RACES OF AFRICA. *

I propose to take a general survey of the commerce between the colored or Ethiopic races of Africa and the civilized world; and then briefly to consider the means by which that commerce, hitherto confined to the coast, can be extended to the interior.

The Ethiopic races inhabit that vast country south of the great desert, which may with tolerable accuracy be defined by a line drawn from the River Senegal to Cape Guardafui as its northern boundary; while its southern limit is the Cape Colony. It thus comprises about forty-five degrees of latitude, and is bounded, east and west, by the Indian and Atlantic Oceans; its area being equal to one-fifth or one-sixth part of the habitable globe.

Apart from any question of inherent inferiority of race, it is obvious that the country occupied by the Ethiopians is not calculated to engender civilization. It lies in too compact a mass, unbroken by bays or inlets; por do the rivers afford either defensive frontiers or the means of commu

* Read before the Statistical Society of London by Archibald Hamilton, Esq.

same cause.

nication and transport equal to those which divide and traverse the other divisions of the globe. The great desert cuts it of from the ancient civil. ization of which the Mediterranean was the centre, while the intercourse subsequently established by the Arabs, is limited and impeded by the

The rivers are all subject to a dıy seascn, which renders them during a part of the year unfit for inland navigation ; and they are all more or less interrupted by rapids and cataracts; though it is true equal obstacles have not bindered the St. Lawrence from becoming the great means in the settlement of Canada.

There are two circumstances which give reason to hope, not only that our commerce with the races dwelling on the coast will be rapidly enlarged, but also be extended inwards. I mean the almost total stoppage of the Christian or transatlantic slave trade, and the rapid strides which have of late been made in the exploration of the continent.

In 1854 Livingstone penetrated from the Cape Colony to Loanda, and thence he crossed to Quillimane, tracing the course of the Zambesi on his way. Subsequently be explored Lake Nyanza, and it has recently been a public consolation to learn that he is now on his way home, most likely down the Nile, to complete our knowledge of Lake Tanganyika, first discovered by Burton. Barth has supplemented the labors of Denham and Clapperton in Central Africa, between the Niger and Lake Tchad, most hopeful and important district of all. Speke and Grant advancing, northwards from Zanzibar, have discovered Lake Victoria Nyanza; while Baker, coming in the opposite direction from Egypt, has terminated the long mystery as to the source of the Nile, having beheld it issuing from the great lake Albert Nyanza. Brilliant as have been the results of these explorations, and others of lesser note, the field of adventure is far from exhausted; much remains for discovery before the map of Africa can be filled up, and the future highways of commerce be traced out. Happily, however, the spirit and enterprise of our countrymen are more likely to be stimulated than diminished by the exploits of the celebrated travelers to whom I have alluded.

There is one subject which occupies a large space in every book of African travel-the slave trade. I do not intend to enter into any

details of the horrors attending that traffic; but as human beings have for three centuries been one of the chief exports from Africa, this subject is inseparably mixed up with that of legitimate commerce; because of the anarchy which the slave trade everywhere creates, the ceaseless kidnapping—slave huntsmand wars undertaken expressly to obtain captives, to the destruction of settled industry. It is even the principal cause of the difficulties experienced in exploring the country; and has, moreover, brutalised the natives on the coast far be!ow the condition of the people in the interior

the

« PreviousContinue »