Page images
PDF
EPUB

CONGRESS

CAPT. ALBERT C. BROWN.

May 11, 1900.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to

be printed.

Mr. PEARCE, from the Committee on Claims, submitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. 256.]

The Committee on Claims, to whom was referred Senate bill 256, for the relief of Capt. Albert C. Brown, having had the same under consideration, submit the following report:

A bill similar in character was favorably reported by this committee during the second session of the Fifty-fifth Congress and passed the Senate. The facts of the case are fully set forth in that report (No. 587), which your committee adopt as their report and recommend the passage of the bill.

The report is as follows:

(Senate Report No. 587, Fifty-fifth Congress, second session.]

The Committee on Claims, to whom was referred Senate bill 3226, having had the same under consideration, respectfully beg to report as follows:

The schooner C. G. White was wrecked off the southwest coast of Kadiak Island, Alaska, on the 13th day of April, 1895. Her crew of American seamen were rescued by Capt. Alfred C. Brown, at great expense to himself. Eleven of the crew were transported by him in his schooner from the place they were wrecked to port of Wood Island, the nearest place where they could obtain medical aid, some of the crew being badly frozen, rendering amputations necessary. All of the crew would have perished had they not been rescued by Captain Brown and served with necessaries, relieved, protected, and transported to Wood Island by him.

The Auditor of the Treasury for the State and other Departments, in his annual report on the 13th day of June, 1895, recommended as follows:

“RELIEF OF SHIPWRECKED SEAMEN IN ALASKA.

"Among the appropriations for the Department of State is one for the protection of American seamen in foreign countries. I respectfully recommend that this appropriation be made in the future to apply to American seamen who may be shipwrecked on the coast of Alaska. Most of that Territory is remote from any other parts of the United States, and it has a very extensive and sparsely settled coast line, with few ports, but little local shipping, and only rare opportunities offered seamen to reship. Claims have frequently been presented from Alaska for the relief and transportation of seamen wherein it was a peculiar hardship to the claimants not to be reimbursed the expenses, but there has been no appropriation available for that purpose.”

[merged small][ocr errors]

In pursuance of this recommendation of the Treasury Department, Congress appropriated, in the act making appropriations to supply deficiencies for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, the following:

“Payment to the North American Commercial Company: To pay the North American Commercial Company for supplies and necessaries furnished by their agents at Wood Island, Alaska, to seventeen members of the crew of the wrecked American sealing schooner C. G. White, in eighteen hundred and ninety-five, two thousand six hundred and seventy-five dollars.'

In the act making appropriations for the diplomatic and consular service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898, Congress appropriated as follows:

“Relief and protection of American seamen: Relief and protection of American seamen in foreign countries, and shipwrecked American seamen in the Territory of Alaska, or so much thereof as may be necessary, fifteen thousand dollars."

These wise and useful enactments and the claim of Captain Brown are of a like character, and it is within their letter and spirit.

Herewith is submitted bill of Albert C. Brown for $1,000, supported by his testimony and affidavit, and also statement sent by the 11 persons rescued. There are also submitted certificates of Clarence F. Dickinson, M. D., of Kadiak; Joseph C. Lane, deputy collector of customs; W. S. Manning, United States marshal, and Alphonso C. Edwards, all of Kadiak, and a letter from the Auditor for the Treasury Department, stating that the accounting officers have no jurisdiction of the claim until Congress acts with reference thereto.

The committee therefore recommends that the bill do pass.

[ocr errors]

KADIAK, ALASKA, May 4, 1895.

The United States of America to Albert C. Brown, Dr.
To caring for and transporting 11 wrecked mariners, wrecked from the schooner
C. G. White off the southwest coast of Kadiak Island April 13, 1895......

$1,000 Albert C. Brown, being first duly sworn, deposes and says that he is the sole owner of the schooner Alexandra; that on the 13th day of April, 1895, the schooner C. G. White was wrecked during a hurricane off the coast on the southwest end of Kadiak Island, district of Alaska; that the officers and crew of said schooner consisted of 27 men, 5 of whom were washed overboard and drowned, and 5 more died from exposure soon after reaching shore; that there was no habitable place on the shore where they were wrecked, and that the men lived for three days and nights in holes dug in the snow; and were without food all that time until rescued by me, at which time they were all frozen, the most of them so badly that amputation of some of their limbs has been necessary; that they would all undoubtedly have perished unless rescued; that there was no possibility of medical treatment where the wreck occurred, and that the nearest place where such treatment could be secured was Wood Island, 150 miles away; that the men were destitute of both money and clothing; that in order to transport them to a place where they could secure proper medical treatment it was necessary for me to put my schooner Alexandra in proper repair, at considerable expense, as I had her high and dry on the beach and out of use; that I did put my schooner in proper repair and did transport these men; that I have expended a large sum of money to save the lives of these wrecked seamen and transported 11 of them from where they were wrecked to a place where they could secure proper medical treatment; and that the sum of $1,000 is a just and reasonable compensation for the money I have expended and the transportation I have furnished them; and that no part of it has been paid, and that they are all unable to reimburse me in any manner or in any sum.

ALBERT C. Brown.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of May, 1895. (SEAL.]

ALPHONSO C. EDWARDS,

United States Commissioner.

KADIAK, ALASKA, May 16, 1895. We, the undersigned, officers and crew of the schooner C. G. White, which was wrecked off the southwest coast of Kadiak Island, Alaska, on the 13th day of April, 1895, state that we were cared for and rescued by Capt. Albert C. Brown, of the schooner Alexandra, at great expense to him, and that Îl of us were transported by

him in his schooner from the place where we were rescued to the port of Wood Island, the nearest point where we could obtain medical aid; that many of us were badly frozen, rendering amputation necessary, and that all of us would certainly have perished had we not been rescued by Captain Brown.

E. W. BAIL.
GUSTAF WICKSTRÖM.
Matiuas MATHIASEN.
F. H. MURRAY.
F. F. ROGERS.
FRANK A. SWEENEY.
YOKOYAMA.

.
YNGWALD LUE.
P. RUNEY.
J. E. VOISINET, Jr.
NAGAWA.

KADIAK, ALASKA, May 14, 1895. This is to certify that Capt. Albert Brown, master of the schooner Alexandra, did, on the 27th day of April, 1895, bring on the aforesaid schooner to the port of Wood Island 11 men, who were wrecked on the schooner C. G. White, which was wrecked on the 13th day of April, 1895. The condition of them was such that if they had not been rescued they would certainly have died. As it was, amputation has been performed on five of them, one of whom, owing to his low condition, occasioned by exposure, was unable to stand the operation.

I am the physician in charge of the above persons, and I unhesitatingly say that had it not been for the action of Captain Brown death would have been the result in all the above cases.

CLARENCE F. DICKENSON, M. D.

Custom-HOUSE, PORT OF KADIAK,

Deputy Collector's Office, May 17, 1895. This is to certify that Albert C. Brown, master of the schooner Alexandra, arrived at Wood Island, Alaska, April 27, A. D. 1895, with eleven mariners from the schooner C. G. White, wrecked near Aiakhtalik, on the southwestern coast of Kadiak Island. April 13, 1895. Were it not for Captain Brown's timely assistance these men would have perished. Some were lying on the beach; others had fallen into snowdrifts, exhausted and benumbed with cold. Mr. Brown carried these men to his house, furnished them with food and clothing, and worked day and night to get his schooner off the beach to take the men to Wood Island, a distance of 150 miles, for medical treatment, where they have had their frozen limbs amputated. One of the men, Captain Harmsen, has since died. These men owe their lives to the heroic efforts of Captain Brown. Very respectfully,

Jos. C. LANE, Deputy Collector of Customs.

DISTRICT OF ALASKA, UNITED STATES MARSHAL'S OFFICE,

Kudiuk, Iluska, May 17, 1895. Capt. Albert C. Brown, of the schooner Alexandra, reached Wood Island, Alaska, with 11 miserable souls aboard April 27, 1895, these men being a few of the victims of the ill-fated schooner C. G. White, which foundered off the southwest coast of Kadiak Island during the severe storm of April 13, 1895, nearly 150 miles from Wood Island, the nearest port where medical attention and proper nursing could be had. The uniortunate suffered from frozen hands and feet and insufficient nourishment. Had not Captain Brown rescued them from their perilous condition, fed, warmed, and transported them to Wood Island, they must have succumbed to a horrible death.

It seems to me but just that Captain Brown should be financially rewarded for his heroic efforts in saving the lives of these shipwrecked seaman, whereby he gave his hospitality, time, and vessel to delivering suffering humanity to a haven of comfort.

W. T. MANNING, United Stutes Deputy Marshal.

KADIAK, ALASKA, May 16, 1895. Capt. Albert C. Brown, of the schooner Alexandra, arrived at the port of Wood Island, Alaska, on the 27th day of April, 1895, having on board his schooner 11 men wrecked from the schooner C. G. White on the 13th day of April, 1895, off the southwest coast of Kadiak Island. These men were in a pitiable condition when they arrived, having had no proper medical attention from the time they were wrecked, and all were more or less frozen, many of them so badly that amputation has since been necessary. Had it not been for the efforts of Captain Brown, all these men must have perished. I have seen these men personally and talked with them, and assisted at seven amputations, and I do not hesitate to say that these men could not have survived much longer, and I am of the opinion that had not Captain Brown rescued them no one else would, as the point where they were wrecked is out of the way of ordinary sea traffic. Respectfully,

ALPHONSO C. EDWARDS,

United States Commissioner.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF AUDITOR FOR THE STATE AND OTHER DEPARTMENTS,

Washington, D. C., January 26, 1898. Sir: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 24th instant, addressed to the Secretary of the Treasury, relative to a claim of Capt. Albert C. Brown, of the American schooner Alexandra, for the sum of $1,000 for fitting out said schooner and rescuing and relieving 11 survivors of the American schooner C. G. White, April 13, 1895, which was wrecked during a hurricane off the southwest coast of Kadiak, Alaska.

You state that as the accounting officers have no jurisdiction of this claim you find your only redress is to appeal to Congress. I concur in the view expressed by you, and for that reason return herewith the claim, as requested. Respectfully, yours,

ERNST G. TIMME, Auditor. WM. B. MATTHEWS, Esq.,

Attorney at Law, Washington, D. C.

[ocr errors]

1st Session.

No. 1411.

NATIONAL WHITE CROSS OF AMERICA.

May 11, 1900. — Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. MUDD, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, sub

mitted the following

REPORT.

[To accompany S. 2581.]

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (S. 2581) to incorporate the National White Cross of America, and for other purposes, beg leave to submit the following report, and recommend that said bill do pass.

The purpose of this legislation is to incorporate the National White Cross of America, and the objects and purposes of this association are fully explained in the language of the hill.

The Senate passed this bill on April 5, 1900.

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »