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" Who but Donne would have thought that a good man is a telescope? Though God be our true glass, through which we see All, since the being of all things is He, Yet are the trunks, which do to us derive Things, in proportion fit, by perspective Deeds of... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson.LL.D..: The lives of the English poets - Page 24
by Samuel Johnson - 1792
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Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, to the Works of the English Poets, Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1779 - 10 pages
...the following lines the ,reader may perhaps cry out— Confvjlon ivorfe confounded* Here lies -a fhe fun, and a. he moon here, She gives the beft light...nothing owe. DONNE. Who but Donne would have thought ithat a good .man is a telefcope ? Tho' God be our true glafs, thro' which we fee .All, fince the being...
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The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets;: Cowley. Denham. Milton. Butler ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1781 - 503 pages
...reading the following lines, the reader may perhaps cry out—ConfuJion worfe confounded. Here lies a fhe fun, and a he moon here, She gives the beft light...and all, and fo They unto one another nothing owe. > . * .. . ....... o DONNE. Who but Donne would have thought that a good man is a telefcope ? Though...
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The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets;: With Critical ..., Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1783
...following lines, the reader may perhaps cry out — Confufion worfe con* founded. , • Here lies a fhe fun, and a he moon here, She gives the beft light...and fo They unto one another nothing owe. DONNE. Who Who but Donne would have thought that a good man is a telefcope ? Though God be our true glafs, through...
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The lives of the most eminent English poets

Samuel Johnson, John Hawkins - 1787
...following lines, the reader may per- / ^ haps cry out — Confufwn worfe confounded. Here lies a fhc fun, and a he moon here She gives the beft light to...telefcope ? Though God be our true glafs, through which we fce All, fmce the being of all things is he, Yet are the trunks, which do to us derive Things in proportion...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: The lives of the most eminent English poets

Samuel Johnson, John Hawkins - English literature - 1787
...the following lines, the reader may perhaps cry out—Confufion ivorfe confounded. &' Here lies a fhe fun, and a he moon here She gives the beft light to...and all, and fo They unto one another nothing owe. Who but Donne would have thought that a good man is a telefcope ? Though God be our true glafs, through...
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The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets,: With Critical ..., Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - Poets, English - 1790
...reading the following lines, the reader may perhaps cry out—Conjufion worfe confounded. Here lies a fhe fun, and a he moon here, She gives the beft light...fee All, fince the being of all things is he, Yet are the trunks, which do to us derive Things in proportion fit, by perfpectivfi Deeds of good men;...
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The Lives of the English Poets: and a Criticism of Their Work

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1795 - 536 pages
...the following lines the reader may perhaps cry out — Confufion -worfe confounded. Here lies a ftie fun, and a he moon here, She gives the beft light...Who but Donne would have thought that a good man is atelefcope? Tho' God be our true glafs, thro' which we fee All, fince the being of all things is he,...
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The Works of the British Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical ...

Robert Anderson - English poetry - 1795
...Valentine ! VH. Here lies a fli? fun, and he a mo n there; She gives the beft light to his fphcre ; Or each is both, and all, and fo They unto one another nothing owe : And yet they do ; but are Eojull and rich in that coin which they pay, That neither would, nor needs,...
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Lives

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1800
...light to his sphere, Or each is both, and all, and so They unto one another nothing owe. , DONNE. Who Who but Donne would have thought that a good man is a. telescope ? Though God be our true glass through which we see All, since the being of all things is...
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Lives of English poets

Samuel Johnson - 1801
...the following lines, the reader may perhaps cry out — Confufion ivorfe confounded. Here lies a fhe fun, and a he moon here, She gives the beft light...Though God be our true glafs through which we fee All, lince the being of all things is he, Yet are the trunks, which do to us derive Things in proportion...
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