The Rambler

Front Cover
Harrison, 1792 - 463 pages

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Contents

cxxxv The Folly of annual Retreats into the Country
306
The Meanneſs and Miſchiefs of indiſcriminate Dedication
308
The Neceſſity of Literary Courage
311
CXXXVỊII Original Characters to be found in the Country The Cha racter of Mrs Buſy
313
A critical Examination of Sampſon Agoniſtes
315
The Criticiſin continued
317
The Danger of attempting Wit in Converſation The Character of Papilius
320
An Account of Squire Bluſter
323
The Criterions of Plagiarilin
325
The Difficulty of railing Reputation The various Species of Detractors
328
Petty Writers not to be deſpiſed
330
An Account of an Author travelling in Queſt of his own Cha racter The Uncertainty of Fame
332
The Courtiers Eſteem of Aſſurance
334
The Cruelty of parental Tyranny 536
338
Adverſity uſeful to the Acquiſition of Knowledge
342
Criticiſm on Epiſtolary Writings
345
The Treatment incurred by Loſs of Fortune
347
The Inefficacy of Genius without Learning
349
The Laws of Writing not always indiſputable Reflections on Tragicomedy
354
The Scholars Complaint of his own Baſhfulneſs
356
Rules of Writing drawn from Examples Thoſe Examples often miſtaken
358
The Nature and Remedies of Baſhfulneſs
360
Rules for the Choice of Aſſociates
363
The Revolutions of a Garret
365
Old Men in Danger of falling into Pupillage The Conduct of Thraſybulus
367
The Miſchiefs of following a Patron
369
CLXIy Praiſe univerſally deſired The Failings of eminent Men often imitated
371
The Impotence of Wealth The Viſit of Serotinus to the Place of his Nativity
373
Favour not eaſily gained by the Poor
375
The Marriage of HymenŠus and Tranquilla
379
Labour neceſſary to Excellence
381
NUMB PAGE NUMB CLXX The Hiſtory of Mifella debauched by her Relation
383
Miſellas Deſcription of the Life of a Proſtitute
385
The Effects of ſudden Riches upon the Manners
388
The Hiſtory of an Adventurer in Lotteries
405
CLxxxļi The Hiſtory of Leviculus the Fortunehunter
407
The Influence of Envy and Intereſt compared
410
The Subject of Eſſays often ſuggeſted by Chance Chance equally prevalent in other Affairs
411
The Prohibition of Revenge juſtifiable by Reaſon The Mean neſs of regulating our Conduct by the Opinions of Men
414
Anningait and Ajut a Greenland Hiſtory
416
CLXXXVII The Hiſtory of Anningait and Ajut concluded
418
CLXXXVIII Favour often gained with little Alliſtance from Underſtanding
420
The Miſchiefs of Falſehood The Character of Turpicula
423
The Hiſtory of Abouzaid the Son of Morad
424
The buſy Life of a young Lady
426
cxcm Love unſucceſsful without Riches
428
cxcur The Authors Art of praiſing himſelf
430
cxcıy A young Noblemans Progreſs in Politeneſs
432
A young Noblemans Introduction to the Knowledge of the Town
434
Human Opinions mutable The Hopes of Youth fallacious
436
cxcvļI The Hiſtory of a Legacyhunter
438
The Legacyhunters Hiſtory concluded
440
The Virtues of Rabbi Abrahams Magnet
445
The Importance of Punctuality
447
The different Acceptations of Poverty Cynicksand Monks not poor
449
ccuiț The Pļeaſures of Life to be ſought in Proſpects of Futurity Future Fame uncertain 451
451
The Hiftory of Ten Days of Seged Emperor of Ethiopia
453
The Hiſtory of Seged concluded
455
covi The Art of living at the Coſt of others 457
457
The Folly of continuing too long upon the Stage
459
cyli The Ramblers Reception His Deſign
461
193
1
The Miſeries of an infirm Conftitution
5
The Contemplation of the Calamities of others a Remedy for Grief
17
III
25
VOLUME THE THIRD
36
The Education of a
50
VOLUME THE SECOND
64

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Page 318 - And buried; but, O yet more miserable! Myself my sepulchre, a moving grave; Buried, yet not exempt, By privilege of death and burial, From worst of other evils, pains and wrongs ; But made hereby obnoxious more To all the miseries of life, Life in captivity Among inhuman foes.
Page 140 - Tenderness, overpower his Fidelity, and tempt him to conceal, if not to invent. There are many who think it an Act of Piety to hide the Faults or Failings of their Friends, even when they can no longer suffer by their Detection; we therefore see whole Ranks of Characters adorned with uniform Panegyrick, and not to be known from one another, but by extrinsick and casual Circumstances. "Let me remember...
Page 285 - The works and operations of nature are too great in their extent, or too much diffused in their relations, and the performances of art too inconstant and uncertain, to be reduced to any determinate idea.
Page 117 - He that would pass the latter part of life with honour and decency, must, when he is young, consider that he shall one day be old ; and remember, when he is old, that he has once been young.
Page 150 - ... in compliance with the varieties of the ground, and to end at last in the common road. Having thus calmed his solicitude, he renewed his pace, though he suspected that he was not gaining ground.
Page 271 - ... he that is growing great and happy by electrifying a bottle, wonders how the world can be engaged by trifling prattle about war or peace.
Page 151 - ... ever unassisted ; that the wanderer may at length return after all his errors, and that he who implores strength and courage from above shall find danger and difficulty give way before him.
Page 233 - ... rotations, towards the centre. She then repented her temerity, and with all her force endeavoured to retreat ; but the draught of the gulph was generally too...
Page 140 - If we owe regard to the memory of the dead, there is yet more respect to be paid to knowledge, to virtue and to truth...
Page 261 - He who knows not how often rigorous laws produce total impunity, and how many crimes are concealed and forgotten for fear of hurrying the offender to that state in which there is no repentance, has conversed very little with mankind.

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