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Provided, however, That no such cooperation shall involve the com- Restriction. munication of Restricted Data relating to the design or fabrication of atomic weapons: And provided further, that the cooperation is undertaken pursuant to an agreement for cooperation entered into in accordance with section 123, or is undertaken pursuant to an agreement existing on the effective date of this Act.”

Seo. 6. Section 144 b. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, 42 USC 2164. is amended to read as follows:

“b. The President may authorize the Department of Defense, with Cooperation the assistance of the Commission, to cooperate with another nation or by Defense with a regional defense organization to which the United States is a Department. party, and to communicate to that nation or organization such Restricted Data (including design information) as is necessary to

“(1) the development of defense plans;

“(2) the training of personnel in the employment of and defense against atomic weapons and other military applications of atomic energy ;

“(3) the evaluation of the capabilities of potential enemies in the employment of atomic weapons and other military applications of atomic energy; and

“(4) the development of compatible delivery systems for atomic

weapons; whenever the President determines that the proposed cooperation and the proposed communication of the Restricted Data will promote and will not constitute an unreasonable risk to the common defense and security, while such other nation or organization is participating with the United States pursuant to an international arrangement by substantial and material contributions to the mutual defense and security: Provided, however, That the cooperation is undertaken pursuant to an agreement entered into in accordance with section 123.".

Sec. 7. Section 144 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, 42 USC 2164. is amended by adding at the end thereof the following new subsections:

"c. In addition to the cooperation authorized in subsections 144 a. Exchange of and 144 b., the President may authorize the Commission, with the information. assistance of the Department of Defense, to cooperate with another nation and

“(1) to exchange with that nation Restricted Data concerning atomic weapons: Provided, That communication of such Restricted Data to that nation is necessary to improve its atomic weapon design, development, or fabrication capability and

provided that nation has made substantial progress in the development of atomic

weapons; and “(2) to communicate or exchange with that nation Restricted Data concerning research, development, or design, of military reactors,

72 Stat. 278. whenever the President determines that the proposed cooperation 72 Stat. 279. and the communication of the proposed Restricted Data will promote and will not constitute an unreasonable risk to the common defense and security, while such other nation is participating with the United States pursuant to an international arrangement by substantial and material contributions to the mutual defense and security: Provided, however, That the cooperation is undertaken pursuant to an agreement entered into in accordance with section 123.

72 Stat. 279. “d. The President may authorize any agency of the United States to communicate in accordance with the terms and conditions of an agreement for cooperation arranged pursuant to subsection 144 a., b., or c., such Restricted Data as is determined to be transmissible under the agreement for cooperation involved."

Approved July 2, 1958.

Public Law 85-519
85th Congress, H. R. 12457

July 15, 1958

AN ACT

72 Stat. 358.

To further amend Public Law 85–162 and Public Law 84-141, to increase the

authorization for appropriations to the Atomic Energy Commission in accordance with section 261 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1934, as amended, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Atomic Energy United States of America in Congress assembled, That section 101 of Conmission. Public Law 85–162, as amended, is further amended by striking thereAppropriations. from the figure “$257,230,000” and inserting in lieu thereof the figure Ante, p. 117.

"$259,480,000". 71 Stat. 404. SEC. 2. Section 101 (e) of Public Law 85–162 is amended by striking

therefrom the figure "$7,750,000" for project 58-e-6, project Sherwood

plant, and substituting therefor the figure “$10,000,000”. 69 Stat. 291. Sec. 3. Section 101 (c) of Public Law 84–141, as amended, is further

amended by striking therefrom the figure "$10,000,000" for project 56-c-1, particle accelerator program, and substituting therefor the figure "$19,406,000".

Approved July 15, 1958.

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85th Congress, H. R. 13121

August 4, 1958

AN ACT

To authorize appropriations for the Atomic Energy Commission in accordance

with section 261 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives af the l'nited States of America in ('ongress assembled,

SEC. 101. PLANT OR FACILITY ACQUISITION OR ('ONSTRUCTION.—There AEC appropriais hereby authorized to be appropriated to the Atomic Energy Com- tion. mission, in accordance with the provisions of section 261 a. (1) of Acquisition, etc., the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the sum of $386,679,000 for

of property.

71 Stat. 274. acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for

42 USC 2017. plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, as follows: (a) SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIALS.

1. Project 59-11-1, plant modifications for processing of nonproduction spent fuels, indetermined sites, $15,000,000.

2. Project 59-1-2, pilot plant for fabrication of new fuel elements, Fernald, Ohio, $335,000.

3. Project 59-8-3, reduction of fire hazards-phase II gaseous diffusion plants, Oak Ridge, Paducah, and Portsmouth, $11,900,000.

4. Project 59-a-4, a new waste storage installation, Arco, Idaho, $3,200,000.

5. Project 59-a-5, production reactor facility for special nuclear materials, convertible type, Hanford, Washington, $145,000,

000. (b) ATOMIC WEAPONS.

1. Project 59-6-1, weapons production and development plants, locations undetermined, $10,000,000.

2. Project 59-6-2, component fabrication plant, Hanford, Washington, $3,500,000.

3. Project 59–6–3, fabrication plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, $12,500,000.

4. Project 59-6-4, special processing plant, Mound Laboratory, Ohio, $2,000,000. (c) ATOMIC WEAPONS.—

1. Project 59-c-1, storage site modifications, various locations, $1,500,000. 2. Project 59-c-2, base construction, Eniwetok Proving

72 Stat. 490. Ground, $2,342,000. 3. Project 59-2-3, base construction, Nevada Test Site, $1,780,

72 Stat. 491. 000.

4. Project 59-6-4, test area development, Nevada Test Site, $600,000.

5. Project 59-c-5, phermex installation, Los Alamos, New Mexico, $2,250,000.

6. Project 59-c-6, laboratory building, TA-33, Los Alamos, New Mexico, $590,000.

7. Project 59-c-7, test and environmental installations, Sandia Base, New Mexico, $1,488,000.

8. Project 59-c-8, lineal acceleration tester, Livermore, California, $390,000.

9. Project 59-c-9, test assembly building, $510,000.

10. Project 59-c-10, high explosive development plant, Livermore, California, $2,000,000.

11. Project 59-c-11, storage and handling building, Livermore, California, $250,000.

(d) REACTOR DEVELOPMENT.

1. Project 59-d-1, reprocessing pilot plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, $3,500,000.

2. Project 59-d-2, special purpose test installation, $2,300,000.

3. Project 59-d-3, fast reactor safety testing station Nevada test site, $1,367,000.

4. Project 59-d-4, Army reactor experimental area (AREA), Arco, Idaho, $1,000,000.

5. Project 59-d-5, hot cells, $5,000,000.

6. Project 59-d-6, Army package power reactor No. 2, $3,000,000.

7. Project 59-d-7, modifications to organic moderated reactor experiment (OMRE), experimental boiling water reactor (EBWR), and boiling reactor experiment (BOŘAX), $6,300,000.

8. Project 59-d-8, heavy water component test reactor, $8,000,000.

9. Project 59-d-9, fuels technology centers addition, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, $5,000,000. 10. Project 59-d-10, gas-cooled power reactor, $51,000,000. 11. Project 59-d-11, Project Sherwood plant, $2,000,000.

12. Project 59-d-12, design and engineering study of heavy water moderated power reactor, $2,500,000.

13. Project 59-d-13, design and engineering studies of two large-scale power reactors and one intermediate size prototype power reactor, $6,000,000.

14. Project 59-d-14, design and engineering study of a power reactor of advanced design capable of utilizing nuclear superheat, such study to be undertaken either as a cooperative project or conducted solely by the Atomic Energy Commission, $750,000.

15. Project 59-d-15, metals and ceramics research building, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, $6,500,000.

16. Project 59-d-16, metals process development plant, Ames, Iowa, $1,900,000. (e) PhysicAL RESEARCH.

1. Project_59-e-1, accelerator improvements, University of California, Radiation Laboratory, California, $1,300,000.

2. Project 59-e-2, CP-5 reactor improvements, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, $500,000.

3. Project 59-2-3, two accelerators, beam analyzing system and magnet, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, $950,000.

4. Project 59-e-4, cyclotron, University of California Radia72 Stat. 491. tion Laboratory, $5,000,000. 72 Stat. 492. 5. Project 59-e-5, central research laboratory addition, Oak

Ridge National Laboratory, $3,500,000.

6. Project 59-e-6, chemistry building addition, University of California Radiation Laboratory, $2,000,000.

7. Project 59-e-7, chemistry hot laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, $4,400,000.

8. Project 59-e-8, expansion of stable isotopes production capacity, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, $900,000.

9. Project 59-2-9, high energy physics building, Columbia University, $500,000.

10. Project_594e-10, particle accelerator program addition, Harvard-MIT accelerator, $1,300,000.

11. Project 59-e-11, high flux research reactor, Brookhaven National Laboratory, design, engineering and advance procurement, $1,000,000.

12. Project 59-e-12, research and engineering reactor, Argonne National Laboratory, design and engineering, $1,000,000.

13. Project 59-e-13, Van de Graaff accelerator, Argonne National Laboratory, $2,500,000.

14. Project 59-2-14, cyclotron, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, $3,000,000.

15. Project 59-e-15, research reactor, Ames Laboratory, $3,800,000. (f) BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE.

1. Project 59-f-1, installations for support of research dealing with radioactive fallout and related radiation hazards, $2,000,000. (g) TRAINING, EDUCATION, AND INFORMATION.

1. Project 59-g-1, additional plant for the Regional Nuclear Training Center, Puerto Rico, $500,000.

2. Project 59-g-2, International Atomic Energy Agency research reactors and laboratory equipment grant, $2,000,000.

3. Project 50-g-3, gamma process development irradiator, $1,600,000. (h) COMMUNITY.

1. Project 59-h-1, school storage buildings, Hanford, Washington, $75,000. (i) GENERAL Plant PROJECTS.—$25,602,000.

Sec. 102. LIMITATIONS.—(a) The Commission is authorized to start any project set forth in subsections 101 (a), (b), (d), (e), (f), and (g) only if the currently estimated cost of that project does not exceed by more than 25 per centum the estimated cost set forth for that project.

(b) The Commission is authorized to start any project set forth in subsections 101 (c) and (h) only if the currently estimated cost of that project does not exceed by more than 10 per centum the estimated cost set forth for that project.

(c) The Commission is authorized to start a project under subsection 101 (i) only if it is in accordance with the following:

1. For community operations, the maximum currently estimated cost of any project shall be $100,000 and the maximum currently estimated cost of any building included in such project shall be $10,000.

2. For all other programs, the maximum currently estimated cost of any project shall be $500,000 and the maximum currently estimated cost of any building included in such a project shall be $100,000.

3. The total cost of all projects undertaken under subsection 101 (i) shall not exceed the estimated cost set forth in that subsection by more than 10 per centum.

72 Stat. 492. Sec. 103. ADVAXCE PLANNING AND DESIGN.—There are hereby 72 Stat. 493. authorized to be appropriated funds for advance planning, construction design, and architectural services, in connection with projects which are not otherwise authorized by law, and the Atomic Energy Commission is authorized to use funds currently or otherwise available to it for such purposes.

SEC. 104. RESTORATION OR REPLACEMENT.—There are hereby authorized to be appropriated funds necessary to restore or to replace plants or facilities destroyed or otherwise seriously damaged, and the Atomic Energy Commission is authorized to use funds currently or otherwise available to it for such purposes.

Sec. 105. CURRENTLY AVAILABLE FUNDS.-In addition to the sums authorized to be appropriated to the Atomic Energy Commission by Section 101 of this Act, there are hereby authorized to be appropriated to the Atomic Energy Commission to accomplish the purposes of this Act such sums of money as may be currently available to the Atomic Energy Commission.

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