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TOTAL AUTHORIZED POSITIONS

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Mr. Casey. How many positions are authorized at the present time?
Mr. CURRAN. 3,825. These are appropriated positions.

Mr. Casey. On page 20 of last year's hearings you had a table showing the number of positions by source of funds. Will you please update that table and put it in the record at this point?

Dr. MUMFORD. Yes, sir.
(The information follows:)

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Number of positions by source of funds, fiscal year 1973
Support from direct appropriations for regular authorized positions--- 3, 825
Support from direct appropriations for temporary, part time, and indefinite
positions

138 Support from appropriated funds transferred from other Federal agencies

171

Total support from appropriated general tax revenues. Support from gift, trust, and service fee funds.

4, 134

258

Grand total.-

4, 392

VACANCIES

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Mr. Casey. How many vacancies do you have now!
Mr. CURRAN. Eighty-two positions in all appropriated funds.

Mr. Casey. Is that a normal number of vacancies? I know that you have turnover including retirements.

Mr. CURRAN. That would be typical as a figure, in the order of 100 vacancies.

TURNOVER RATE

Mr. Casey. What is your rate of turnover?

Mr. CURRAN. This year to date, the rate of turnover has been 23 percent agencywide through all funds.

Mr. Casey. How does that break down in grade levels? Are most of them in the upper or the lower grades?

Mr. CURRAN. Typically there is a higher turnover rate among the lower paid staff because they are looking for a career of one kir another. Some of them are students and have other commitments and that kind of thing. Personnel paid in higher grades tend to be lower in turnover.

I don't have the exact figures.
Mr. Casey. Do you use a lapse rate in figuring your personnel costs?
Mr. CURRAN. Yes, sir.
Mr. Casey. Do you take turnover into consideration?
Mr. CURRAN. Yes, indeed.

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FUNDING OF TEMPORARY POSITIONS

Mr. Casey. You have some temporary positions ?
Mr. CURRAN. Yes, sir.
Mr. Casey. How are they funded ?

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or any

Mr. CURRAN. Most temporary positions are funded in one of two ways. When budgeted positions are vacant, we use the funds from that source. This is in effect a kind of blocked job for a short period of time,

a other savings which might accumulate from vacant positions. Occasionally other temporary positions might be funded from gift funds or that sort of thing.

Mr. Casey. Where are these 138 positions you want to make permanent, are they temporary positions?

Dr. MUMFORD. Those are indefinite positions, Mr. Chairman. When we were beginning the program in automation and also in developing the program on preservation, we received money for this purpose. We did not want at that point to attempt to build up a permanent staff because it was not clear just what would be needed in each kind of operation. Now that we have moved from the developmental stage to the operating stage, it is clear which positions need to be continued. And while no additional funds are required, we would like to be able to remove the indefinite status of these people.

Mr. Casey. Are all 138 positions in the automation program?

Dr. MUMFORD. No, sir. Mostly in automation but partly in preservation.

Mr. Casey. They were all indefinite?
Dr. MUMFORD. Yes, sir.

Mr. CASEY. Is there much of a difference between an indefinite position and a temporary position?

Dr. MUMFORD. Under our regulations there is a considerable difference.

Mr. Casey. You are asking for how many new positions, 424?
Mr. CURRAN. Yes, sir.
Mr. Casey. You want to deduct the 13 positions you said

you

didn't need?

REVISED ESTIMATE OF NEW POSITIONS Mr. CURRAN. Yes, sir. There is a total of 286 positions for which we are requesting additional funds, less the 13 which we are now withdrawing, so the net would be 273 positions for which we are requesting additional funding. Then, in terms of authorizations for permanent positions, we would add another 138. The money for those jobs which you just referred to is in the current year budget, and we are asking for authority to make them permanent. That would raise the request to 411 permanent positions, of which 273 would require additional funding.

POSITIONS FOR NEW PROGRAMS

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Mr. Casey. How many new positions are needed for new programs? Do you have any new programs involved in this request for new positions ?

Mr. CURRAN. Yes, sir.
Mr. CASEY. Like what?

Mr. CURRAN. In the appropriation, salaries and expenses, Library of Congress, which is on table III, on page 3 of the green sheets, we are asking for a net appropriation, total of 141 new regular positions, plus 24 for the national program for acquisitions and cataloging. Out

of that 141, the cataloging-in-publication program is a new program for which we are asking for 29 new positions.

Mr. CASEY. Where is that in this summary table ?

Mr. CURRAN. It is part of the totals in the first column. That particular program is presented later in the justifications on page 31. It is a new program for the budget request.

Mr. CASEY. Do you have requests for any other new programs!

Mr. CURRAN. Tħe national serials data program, which is being requested in this budget for the first time. It has nine new positions, and is a new request in this budget.

Mr. CASEY. You said this is a new request for this budget. In other words, is this an ongoing program that has not been in this budget in the past?

Dr. MUMFORD. The cataloging-in-publication program has begun with grants from foundations. It is an ongoing program. Mr. Welsh will elaborate on what it consists of. It is not new in substance but it is new to our request for funds.

Mr. Casey. Any others?

Mr. CURRAN. Those are the new programs in our basic appropriation. The rest of the increases in new positions are essential to strengthening existing programs in a variety of ways.

Mr. Casey. You say a strengthening. Is there a workload factor involved

Mr. CURRAN. It is a matter of additional workload, yes, sir.

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WORKLOAD MEASUREMENT

Mr. Casey. How do you measure this increased workload. Is it determined by finding out that people can't keep current and get behind or what is the measure?

Dr. MUMFORD. It is manifested in terms of arrearages, such as in serials cataloging and increased amounts of material coming in. When we are not able to keep pace with the flow that is coming in, arrearages will develop and increase if we don't receive additional help in managing it.

REVENUE-PRODUCING ACTIVITIES

Mr. Casey. You mentioned in your statement that one source of revenue is the sale of catalog cards. Do you have other sources of revenue ?

Mr. CURRAN. The principal source of revenue for the Library is the catalog card sales and receipts for registration of copyrights. We have miscellaneous receipts in a few other categories that amount up to $50,984.

Mr. Casey. Please give us for the record at this point a table showing the amount of revenues received by appropriation on a comparative basis for fiscal year 1972, and estimated for 1973 and 1974.

Dr. MUMFORD. Yes, sir. We have a table under the appropriation “Distribution of Catalog Cards," which shows that, and also under the "Copyright Office," which shows the amount of fees collected for registrations. That is shown by year.

(The information follows:)

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS-STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, TREASURY DEPARTMENT GENERAL FUND ACCOUNT

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Mr. Casey. Are the revenues increasing or decreasing?
Dr. MUMFORD. In the case of catalog cards, we received fewer orders.
They are decreasing, but at the same time we are filling more of the
orders and the total amount of card sales, cards sold, remains pretty
much the same.

In the case of copyright registrations, it has leveled off with some
increases, but that is why we withdrew the request for the additional
positions for the Copyright Office.

RENTED SPACE OCCUPIED BY LIBRARY

Mr. Casey. Last year you gave us a breakdown of space located off
Capitol Hill that you occupy through the General Services Adminis-
tration. Please update that table which appears on page 24 of last
year's hearings and insert it in the record at this point.

Mr. CURRAN. I have that table here.
(NOTE.-See pp. 195–197 for additional testimony.)
(The information follows:)

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APPROPRIATION :
RENTAL OF SPACE

SALARIES AND EXPENSES, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS (CONTINUED)

The Library currently occupies the locations listed below in addition to the two buiidings on Capitol Riu.

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3. Middle River, Maryland

Storage

39,780

18,000

7.

Copyright Office

Crystal Mall
Arlington, Virginia

81,187

394,000

9.

104,000

2. Bldgs 159 & 159E, Navy Yard

119,2014

130,000

Card Division, GPO Branch,
Training Offices,
Contracting and Procure-
ment and Storage

83,995

266,678

4. 1291 Taylor Street, N. W. Division for the Blind and

Physically Handicapped
5. 215 Massachusetts Ave., N.ß. Information Abstracting,

Catalog Publication Division

53,676

259,330

Newspapers and other
materials

48,762

6. 2028 Duke Street,

Alexandria, Virginia

144,547

8. 800 S. Pickett Street

Alexandria, Virginia

122,200

376,000

Geography and Map Division,
Laminating, and Copyright
Deposits

10.

Available to Library of Congress for related costs ..
Additional space required, fiscal 1974:

110 Indiana Avenue (committed by GSA)
Other Space .....

15,800
25,000

87,000
206,000

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Note:

Locations numbered 1, 2, and
maintenance costs.

are Government-owned buildings and cost shown only reflects

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