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For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. -

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Architectural

Library

7293
A53
1948

This volume was prepared by the staff of the National Housing Agency and arrangements for publication were made by that Agency. It is being issued by the Office of the Administrator, Housing and Home Finance Agency, which succeeded the National Housing Agency pursuant to Reorganization Plan No. 3, effective July 27, 1947 Under this reorganization plan the names of the constituent agencies were changed as follows: The Federal Home Loan Bank Administration became the Home Loan Bank Board; and the Federal Public Housing Authority became the Public Housing Administration. The name of the Federal Housing Administration remains unchanged.

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This Handbook of Housing Statistics has been prepared by the National Housing Agency as a modest beginning in what is believed to be an important task—the development of labor saving tools that will speed and simplify the work of those who wish to obtain statistics about housing.

There are an increasing number of persons in both private and public life whose work requires them to seek such statistics and to know something about what they represent, how they are assembled and their reliability and limitations for various purposes. Most of these persons are not prepared for the great variety of data relevant to housing which the efforts of private and public agencies have produced during the last two decades, nor are they prepared for the considerable amount of work necessary to identify these agencies, to learn what service each performs, and to assemble the necessary pieces from the separate

sources.

It is the purpose of this book to eliminate some of this effort, first by providing within its covers the most commonly used statistical material, with technical comment about the content of the figures and the methods used in assembling them, second by pointing out the types of data which either are not available or are too scanty or imperfect for general use and third by pointing to the sources from which additional detail or continuing reports may be obtained.

Statistics are included on the volume and cost of new housing production, on the size and characteristics of the existing stock of housing, and on the financial aspects of housing, and this book is organized in three parts, each covering one of these phases of housing. For the most part the data relate to nonfarm housing; specific data for rural housing appearing only in the discussion of housing supply. In selecting the data to be included under each of these headings, the many inquiries received by the National Housing

Agency from industry, public officials and private citizens have been kept in mind as a guide to general usefulness.

Users of this handbook who do not find the data they seek in this volume will probably be able to obtain source references from which the information can be secured, or from reference to this book will be able to learn whether such statistics are available. These references are presented as source notes to the tables and in greater detail in appendix A.

Evidences of the need for further coordination among agencies, both public and private, which collect and use housing statistics will be observed throughout this book. Uniformity of terminology and definitions is a first essential step toward such coordination. Extension of coverage to include information in certain areas which have thus far remained "blank spots” in the housing statistics picture is another needed step. Additional studies will be required to determine the continuing relationship of housing to the national economy.

The preparation of this volume was under the direction of B. Douglas Stone. E. E. Ashley III and A. R. Reimers served as consultants on the selection of material to be included. Original preparation of tabular and textual material for the book was done by Chester Cooper, Dave Lowery, John West, and Eleanor Wolkind, and staff members assigned to them. Editing and preparation for publication was under the direction of Charles F. Shea. A considerable portion of the data included in this volume was obtained from the constituent agencies, i, e., Federal Housing Administration, Federal Public Housing Authority, and Federal Home Loan Bank Administration. Contributions from various other agencies are acknowledged in source notes and bibliography.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Part One. Housing Production and Cost
Table 1. New privately financed nonfarm dwelling units started, United States totals,

by urban and rural nonfarm area, by year, 1920–46..
Table 2. New privately financed nonfarm dwelling units started, United States totals,

by type of structure, by year, 1920–46; by month, January 1945–March 1947.---
Table 3. New privately financed dwelling units started in urban areas: By type of

structure, by year, 1936–46; by month, January 1945-March 1947.--
Table 4. Number of new privately financed dwelling units started in rural nonfarm

areas: By type of structure, by year, 1936–46...
Table 5. New privately financed nonfarm dwelling units started: By geographic

division, by type of structure, by year, 1940–46.-
Table 6. New privately financed nonfarm dwelling units started: By geographic

division, by urban and rural nonfarm areas, by year, 1940–46. -
Table 7. New privately financed dwelling units started in urban areas: By geographic

division, by type of structure, by year, 1940–46.---
Table 8. New privately financed dwelling units started in rural nonfarm areas: By

geographic division, by type of structure, by year, 1940–46.
Table 9. New privately financed dwelling units started in urban areas: By geographic

division, by type of structure, by month, January 1946–March 1947
Table 10. New privately financed nonfarm dwelling units started in 29 industrial

areas: By month, January 1946–December 1946...
Table 11. New privately financed nonfarm dwelling units started in 30 urban areas:

By month, January 1946-December 1946.--
Table 12. Local building permit valuation: Number of dwelling units and average

valuation of new nonfarm private dwelling units started for a fixed sample of

257 cities, by type of structure, by year, 1921-45.-
Table 13. Local building permit valuation: Total and average estimated valuation

of new nonfarm private dwelling units started, for the United States as a whole,
by type of structure, by quarter, 1940–46---

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Table 14. Construction cost of new nonfarm dwelling units started: By type of

financing, by year, 1920–46; by month, January 1945–December 1946. Table 15. Value of construction put in place: Total new construction and private

residential nonfarm construction, by year, 1915–46; by month, January 1945–

December 1946.
Table 16. Construction contracts awarded: Data for 37 States, by type of construc-

tion, by type of ownership, by year, 1919–46.-
Table 17. Řesidential construction contracts awarded: Data for 37 States, by type

of ownership, by month, January 1939-December 1946. Table 18. Number of units in publicly financed new nonfarm family dwelling projects

started in continental United States, and their development cost, by year, 1936-46. Table 19. Number of units in publicly financed new nonfarm family dwelling projects

completed in continental United States, and their development cost, by year,

1936-46.. Table 20. U. S. Housing Authority public low-rent housing: Active nonfarm develop

ments and dwelling units approved by the President, by program and by year,

1934–46.. Table 21. U. S. Housing Authority public low-rent housing: Nonfarm developments

and dwelling units completed by program and by year, 1936–46.. Table 22. Publicly financed nonfarm family dwelling units under active management

in Federal Public Housing Authority programs, by month, January 1946–

February 1947..-
Table 23. Wholesale price indexes for specified building materials, by year, 1913-46..
Table 24. Wholesale price indexes for specified building materials, by month, January

1945-April 1947- -
Table 25. Average hourly earnings of skilled and common labor in general con-

struction, by year, 1913–46; by month, January 1945–December 1946Table 26. Average hourly and average weekly earnings in private building construc

tion; by year, 1934–46; by month, January 1940-December 1946Table 27. Indexes of union weekly hours and union hourly wage rates in all building

trades, by year, 1907-46.. Table 28. Cost of house and land: Percentage distribution of the major elements

which comprised the capital cost of house and land in 1940-41.. Table 29. Residential construction costs: Boeckh index for brick residences in 20

reporting cities, by year, 1913–46.. Table 30. Residential construction costs: Boeckh index for frame residences in 20

reporting cities, by year, 1913–46. Table 31. Residential construction costs: Boeckh index for brick residences in 20

reporting cities, by month, January 1945–December 1946.Table 32. Residential construction costs: Boeckh index for frame residences in 20

reporting cities, by month, January 1945–December 1946. Table 33. Consolidated Boeckh index of construction cost and index of dwelling unit

cost, by year, 1920–46. Table 34. Residential construction costs: National Housing Agency indexes, by

month, November 1935– December 1946.Table 35. Residential construction costs: National Housing Agency indexes, by

geographic division, by quarter, 1936–46..

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Part Two. Housing Supply and Need
Table 36. Nonfarm dwelling units by geographic division and State, 1940.-
Table 37. Type of structure: Nonfarm dwelling units in selected metropolitan dis-

tricts, 1920.--
Table 38. Type of structure: Nonfarm dwelling units by geographic division, 1940.-
Table 39. Type of structure: Nonfarm dwelling units by monthly rent, 1940.-
Table 40. Number of rooms: Nonfarm dwelling units by geographic division, 1940..
Table 41. Number of rooms: Medians for all dwelling units in each geographic divi-

sion, 1940...
Table 42. Type of structure and number of rooms: Nonfarm dwelling units, 1940-
Table 43. Exterior material: Nonfarm residential structures by geographic division,

1940. Table 44. Year built: Nonfarm dwelling units by geographic division, 1940. Table 45. State of repair and plumbing equipment: Nonfarm dwelling units, No

vember 1945 and change since 1940. Table 46. State of repair and plumbing equipment: Nonfarm dwelling units by type

of structure and geographic region, 1940.Table 47. State of repair and plumbing equipment: Occupied and vacant nonfarm

dwelling units by geographic region, 1940.-
Table 48. State of repair and plumbing equipment: Nonfarm and rural farm dwelling

units inside and outside metropolitan districts, 1940.---
Table 49. Tenure: Nonfarm and farm dwelling units, 1890 to 1945.
Table 50. Rent: Nonfarm dwelling units by year built, 1940.-
Table 51. Tenure and rent: Nonfarm dwelling units by number of rooms, 1940-
Table 52. Vacancy and tenure: Nonfarm and rural farm dwelling units, 1940 and

1945.
Table 53. Occupancy and vacancy: Nonfarm and rural farm dwelling units by

geographic division, 1940..

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