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The employment of citizens or subjects of foreign powers as clerks in the diplomatic branch of the Foreign Service, and in the consular branch where the salary is $1,000 per annum, or more, is prohibited by law. Therefore, only American citizens are employed as clerks in the diplomatio branch, and in positions in the consular branch the salaries of which are $1,000 or more. Preference is given to honorably discharged soldiers and sailors who possess the requisite qualifications.

Women are equally eligible with men for clerkships in the Foreign Service. However, the climatic and social conditions at many posts render it impossible for women to serve at them with satisfaction to themselves and advantage to the Government.

The duties of clerks consist of such routine work as may be assigned to them by the officers in charge. An idea of the scope of these duties may be gained from a perusal of the functions of secretaries and consular officers which are enumerated elsewhere in this publication. It is desirable that clerks should be stenographers and possess a knowledge of the language of the country in which they are to be employed.

It is the practice of the department to commission clerks as vice consuls only when a need exists at the office to which they are assigned, and not until they have served for a sufficient period to judge of their abilities and conduct and that they merit such recognition. Whenever clerks are commissioned as vice consuls not of career their duties do not change, and they are not eligible to promotion to the grade of Foreign Service officer without undergoing the usual examinations. A commission as vice consul not of career does not carry with it an increase in compensation.

No formal examination is required for appointment to a clerkship; the department, however, reserves the right to examine an applicant in any particular it may deem advisable.

No one who is under 21 or over 35 years of age or who is not in excellent physical condition will be considered for these positions. The department may require the applicant to undergo a physical examination.

Application blanks for clerical appointments may be obtained from the Office of Foreign Service Personnel, Department of State. For further information regarding applications for such appointments, see page 259.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

FEES

Foreign Service officers are required to account for all fees which they collect, and the salary fixed by law or regulation constitutes their sole and only compensation, except as specially provided in the case of consular agents who are compensated by one-half of the fees collected by them not exceeding, in any case, $1,000 a year.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE Within his discretion, the Secretary of State may grant Foreign Service officers leave of absence, for reasonable periods, in no case to exceed 60 days in one year, except that, when leave is granted with permission to visit the United States, the time actually and necessarily occupied in transit by the most direct route will be approved in addition to the 60 days.

TRAVELING EXPENSES Under regulations prescribed by the Secretary of State, the Government defrays the actual and necessary expenses of transportation, and subsistence to a legal limit, of Foreign Service officers and clerks in missions and consulates and their families and effects in going to and returning from their posts or when traveling under orders, but makes no allowance for any expense incurred in connection with ordinary leaves of absence. Section 15 of the act of May 24, 1924, authorizes the Secretary of State to order officers to the United States on leave at the expense of the Government after three years of continuous service abroad and provides that while in the United States the services of such officers shall be available for trade conference work or for such duties in the Department of State as the Secretary may prescribe.

EFFICIENCY RECORDS Though the scene of his activities may be far removed from the United States, a Foreign Service officer's work is nevertheless closely watched by the Department of State, and he is given every opportunity to prove his worth to the service and credit for all that he accomplishes. A detailed efficiency record is kept in the Department of State, based upon personal and official conduct, the manner in which he handles business intrusted to him, and his knowledge of the technique of Foreign Service administration. Furthermore, all missions and consulates are visited at intervals by an inspector who examines their condition and the administration, reports fully thereon to the department, and gives officers counsel and advice.

XXIV. BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR THE FOREIGN SERVICE

(Under the Executive order of June 7, 1924)

Robert E. Olds, of Minnesota William R. Castle, jr., of the District of Columbia Wilbur J. Carr, of New York Edward J. Norton,' of Tennessee

Howard A. Edson, of Vermont

XXV. DISPATCH AGENTS

I. P. Roosa, Room 622, No. 2 Rector Street, New York
Joseph F. Roberts, Room 5, Ferry Post Office, San Francisco
C. J. Petherick, 6 Grosvenor Gardens, S. W. 1, London, England
Somerset A. Owen, Room 357, Post Office Building, New Orleans, Louisiana

1 Foreign Service officer.

267

XXVI, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS, COMMITTEES, INSTITUTES, OFFICES, AND TRIBUNALS

UNITED STATES COURT FOR CHINA

(Act of June 30, 1906)
Judge: Milton Dwight Purdy, of Minnesota
District Attorney: George Sellett, of Illinois
Marshal: Thurston R. Porter, of New York
Clerk: J. Marvin Howes, of Oregon
Assistant Clerk: Louis T. Kenake, of California

INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

(Treaty of March 1, 1889)

OFFICES AT El Paso, TEXAS Commissioner on the part of the United States: Lawrence M. Lawson, of California Consulting engineer on the part of the United States: Culver M. Ainsworth, of New Mexico Commissioner on the part of Mexico: Gustavo P. Serrano Consulting engineer on the part of Mexico: Armando Santacruz, jr. Secretary and disbursing officer of the United States Commission: Clark W. Creps, of Texas Secretary of the Mexican Commission: José Hernandez Ojeda

ALASKAN BOUNDARY DELIMITATION COMMISSION AND CANADIAN BOUNDARY

DELIMITATION COMMISSION

(Conventions of April 21, 1906, and April 11, 1908)
Commissioner for the United States: E. Lester Jones, of Virginia
Chief Clerk and Disbursing Officer: Edgar A. Klapp, of Mississippi
Commissioner for Great Britain: J. D. Craig

INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA

(Treaty of January 11, 1909) Commissioners for the United States: Clarence D. Clark, of Wyoming; Fred Thomas Dubois, of

Idaho; Porter J. McCumber, of North Dakota
Secretary: William H. Smith, of the District of Columbia
Commissioners for Great Britain: Charles A. Magrath, Henry A. Powell, K. C., Sir William Hearst,

K. C. M. G.
Secretary: Lawrence Johnston Burpee

MIXED CLAIMS COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND GERMANY

(Agreement of August 10, 1922)
Umpire: Edwin B. Parker, of Texas
American Commissioner: Chandler P. Anderson, of New York
German Commissioner: Wilhelm Kiesselbach
American Agent: Robert W. Bonynge, of New York

German Agent: Karl von Lewinski

TRIPARTITE CLAIMS COMMISSION, UNITED STATES, AUSTRIA, AND HUNGARY

(Agreement of November 26, 1924)
Commissioner: Edwin B. Parker, of Texas
American agent: Robert W. Bonynge, of New York
Austrian agent: Ernst Prossinagg
Hungarian agent: Alexis de Boér

GENERAL CLAIMS COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

(Convention of September 8, 1923)

American Commissioner: Fred K. Neilsen, of Nebraska
Mexican Commissioner: G. Fernandez MacGregor
American Agent: Clement L. Bouvé, of the District of Columbia
Assistant American Agents: Marshall Morgan, of Tennessee; John J. McDonald, of New Hampshire
Mexican Agent: Dr. Bartolomé Carbajal y Rosas
American Secretary: Benedict M. English, of Nebraska
Mexican Secretary: José Romero

SPECIAL CLAIMS COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

(Convention of September 10, 1923) American Commissioner: Ernest B. Perry, of Nebraska Mexican Commissioner: F. González Roa American Agent: Clement L. Bouvé, of the District of Columbia Assistant American Agents: Marshall Morgan, of Tennessee; John J. McDonald, of New Hampshire Mexican Agent: Aquiles Elorduy American Secretary: Noble Warrum, of Utah Mexican Secretary: J. Aspe Suinaga

INTER AMERICAN HIGH COMMISSION, UNITED STATES SECTION

HURLEY-WRIGHT BUILDING, EIGHTEENTH STREET AND PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE Honorary Chairman: Andrew W. Mellon, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of the Treasury Chairman: Herbert Hoover, of California, Secretary of Commerce Vice Chairman: Wesley L. Jones, of Washington, chairman of the Committee on Commerce of the

United States Senate Members:

0. K. Davis, of New York, secretary of the National Foreign Trade Council John H. Fahey, of Massachusetts, member of the senior council of the Chamber of Commerce

of the United States William 0. Hart, of Louisiana, treasurer of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uni.

form State Laws A. C. Miller, of California, member of the Federal Reserve Board W. W. Nichols, of New York, president of the American Manufacturers' Export Association

Lewis E. Pierson, of Illinois, president of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States Honorary Member: L. S. Rowe, of Pennsylvania, Director General of the Pan American Union Secretary: Julius Klein, of California, Director of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce,

Department of Commerce
Assistant Secretary: J. Homer Butler, of Massachusetts
Administrative Assistant: Miss Harriet M. Sweet, of Washington

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