Taxation: Past, Present, and Future

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Williams & Norgate, 1874 - Taxation - 348 pages
 

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Page 90 - Every tax ought to be levied at the time, or in the manner in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it.
Page 214 - If any of the provinces of the British empire cannot be made to contribute towards the support of the whole empire, it is surely time that Great Britain should free herself from the expence of defending those provinces in time of war.
Page 64 - The subjects of every State ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible in proportion to their respective abilities ; that is, in proportion to the revenue they respectively enjoy under the protection of the State .... In the observation or neglect of this maxim, consists what is called the equality 'or inequality of taxation.
Page ix - L'on voit * certains animaux farouches , des mâles et des femelles, répandus par la campagne, noirs , livides, et tout brûlés du soleil, attachés à la terre qu'ils fouillent et qu'ils remuent avec une opiniâtreté invincible : ils ont comme une voix articulée ; et quand ils se lèvent sur leurs pieds , ils montrent une face humaine , et en effet ils sont des hommes.
Page 65 - The certainty of what each individual ought to pay is, in taxation, a matter of so great importance, that a very considerable degree of inequality, it appears, I believe, from the experience of all nations, is not near so great an evil as a very small degree of uncertainty.
Page 66 - Taxes upon such consumable goods as are articles of luxury are all finally paid by the consumer, and generally in a manner that is very convenient for him. He pays them by little and little, as he has occasion to buy the goods.
Page 66 - Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the State.
Page 234 - ... vessels in old time, that a man should hardly find four pieces of pewter (of which one was peradventure a salt) in a good farmer's house.
Page 235 - Now have we many chimneys ; and yet our tenderlings complain of rheums, catarrhs, and poses ; then had we none but reredosses, and our heads did never ache. For as the smoke in those days was supposed to be a sufficient hardening for the timber of the house, so it was reputed a far better medicine to keep the good-man and his family from the quack or pose, wherewith, as then, very few were acquainted.
Page 92 - In great empires, the people who live in the capital, and in the provinces remote from the scene of action, feel many of them scarce any inconveniency from the war, but enjoy, at their ease, the amusement of reading in the newspapers the exploits of their own fleets and armies.

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