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*TERICAN NEUTRALITY POLICY

BEFORE THE

HEARINGS
al Norgetah (ausia

COMMITEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS
HOUSLOF REPRESENTATIVES

SEVLTY-SIXTH CONGRESS

A

"IRST SESSION

ON

Present Neutrality Law (Pulic Res. No. 27)

(75th Congress)
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS THERETO, AND RELATED
LEGISLATION AFFECTING THE FOREIGN

POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES

APRIL 11, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, AND MAY 2, 1939

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COMMITTEE ON FORFUN AFFAIRS

SAM D. MCRNOLDS, rennessee, Chairman
SOL BLOOM, New York

HAMILTON FISH, New York
LUTHER A.
JOHNSON, Texas

CHARLES A. EATON, New Jersey
JOHN KEE, West
Virginia

GEORGE HOLDEN TINKHAM, Massachusetts
JAMES P. RICHARDS, South-arolina EDITH NOURSE ROGERS, Massachusetts
THOMAS C. HENNINGS, JR., Missouri BRUCE BARTON, New York
JAMES A. SHANLEY, Connecticut ROBERT B. CHIPERFIELD, Illinois
JOSEPH L. PFEIFER, New York ROBERT J. CORBETT, Pennsylvania
A. L. FORD, Mississippi

JOHN M. VORYS, Ohio ED. V. IZAC, California

FOSTER STEARNS, New Hampshire ROBERT L. MOUTON, Louisiana ANDREW C. SCHIFFLER, West Virginia ROBERT G. ALLEN, Pennsylvania PETE JARMAN, Alabama LAURENCE F. ARNOLD, Illinois W. 0. BURGIN, North Carolina

I. R. BARNES, Clerk

II

UT*":

SY THE
NITIDSMES OF AMERICA

Statements of

Page

Bingham, Mr. Alfred, editor, Common Sense, New York City--- 283

Brant, Irving, 630 F Street NW., Washington, D. C.---

587

Brunauer, Dr. Esther Caukin, associate in international education,

American Association of University Women, 1634 I Street NW.,

Washington, D. C.

378, 553

Castle, Hon. William R., former Assistant Secretary of State, Wash-

ington, D. C..

109

Chase, Dr. William, Brooklyn, N. Y.

525

Close, Mr. Upton, Valhalla, N. Y.

233

Coffee, Hon. John M., Representative in Congress from the State of

Washington.--

221

Crawford, Hon. Fred L., Representative in Congress from the State
of Michigan...

47
Dennis, Mr. Laurence, representative of E. A. Pearce Co., 40 Wall
Street, New York City -

371
Douglas, Mr. Henry H., chairman, Washington Society for Aid to
China, Washington, D. C...

361
Eichelberger, Mr. Clark, chairman, American Union for Concerted
Peace Efforts, 8 West Fortieth Street, New York City -

570
Emerson, Mr. Ralph, legislative representative, Joint Maritime Legis-

lative Committee, 1627 K Street NW., Washington, D. C.- 486, 491

Faddis, Hon. Charles I., Representative in Congress from the State

of Pennsylvania....

6

Fenwick, Dr. Charles G., professor of international and constitutional

law, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa-

79, 175

Fish, Hon. Hamilton, Representative in Congress from the State of

New York.

Fitch, Mrs. George A., Committee on Non-Participation in Japanes
Aggression, Washington, D. C.

401

Fleming, Prof. D. F., Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.

535

Geyer, Hon. Lee E., Representative in Congress from the State of

California.

533

Guyer, Hon. U. S., Representative in Congress from the State of
Kansas.

1

Haan, Mr. Filsoo K., Sino-Korean People's League, 101 D Street NE.,

Washington, D. C.

513

Healy, Dr. Thomas, dean of the school of foreign service, Georgetown

University, Washington, D. C.

69

Howe, Mr. Quincy, 1133 Park Avenue, New York City -

393

Hyde, Dr. Charles C., Columbia University, New York City

506

Judd, Dr. Walter H., 9 Vincent Place, Montclair, N. J.--

332

Keefe, Hon. Frank B., Representative in Congress from the State of

Wisconsin

99

Lage, Mr. William Potter, 120 Broadway, New York City -

195

Libby, Mr. Frederick J., executive secretary, National Council for

Prevention of War, 532 Seventeenth Street NW., Washington, D. C. 470

Luckey, Hon. Henry H., former Representative in Congress from the

State of Nebraska..

303

Ludlow, Hon. Louis, Representative in Congress from the State of

Indiana.

417

Maas, Hon. Melvin J., Representative in Congress from the State of

Minnesota..

19

Marsh, Mr. Benjamin, executive secretary, The People's Lobby,

Washington, D. C..

294

Matthews, Mr. Wm. R., editor, Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Ariz.--. 354

lese

Page

158

61

28

Statements of-Continued.

Monsman, Dr. Diana, representing the Maryland State Division of the

Keep America out of War Congress, 721 Newington Avenue, Balti-

Morley, Mr. Felix, editor, Washington Post, Washington, D. C..

Rankin, Miss Jeannette, Washington, D. C.

Schain, Miss Josephine, chairman, National Committee on Cause and

Cure of War, 70 East Forty-fifth Street, New York City -

Sisson, Hon. Fred J., former Representative in Congress from the State

of New York, 1635 R Street NW., Washington, D. C.--

Stewart, Mr. Maxwell, room 6333, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York

City -

Streeter, Mrs. Thomas W., Morristown, N. J.

Thomas, Hon. Norman, New York City

Tilson, Hon. John Q., former Representative in Congress from the

State of Connecticut, Shoreham Building, Washington, D. C.--

Tobin, Prof. Harold J., assistant professor of political science, Dart-

mouth College, Hanover, N. H.-.

Van Antwerp, Mr. Eugene, commander in chief of the Veterans of For-

eign Wars, Detroit, Mich.-

Van Zandt, Hon. James E., Representative in Congress from the

State of Pennsylvania -
Voorhis, Hon. Jerry, Representative in Congress from the State of

California

Wadsworth, Hon. James W., Representative in Congress from the

State of New York.
Ward, Dr. Harry, The American League for Peace and Democracy,

room 701, 268 Fourth Avenue, New York City

Act of August 31, 1935— Public Res. No. 67, Seventy-fourth Congress-

Act of February 29, 1936– Public Res. No. 74, Seventy-fourth Congress-

Act of January 8, 1937— Public Res. No. 1, Seventy-fifth Congress (Spanish

embargo lifted by Presidential proclamation, April 1, 1939) -

Act of May 1, 1937—Public Res. No. 27, Seventy-fifth Congress-

H. Res. 100% Prohibit the transfer, loan, or sale of arms or munitions. By

Mrs. Rogers of Massachusetts..

H. J. Res. 3—To prohibit the shipment of arms, munitions, and implements

of war from any place in the United States. By Mr. Ludlow-

H. J. Res. 7–To implement the Kellogg-Briand Pact for World Peace.

By Mr. Guyer of Kansas -

H. J. Res. 16—To prohibit the export of arms, ammunition, or implements

of war, and so forth. By Mr. Knutson..

H. J. Res. 42-Embargo on scrap iron and pig iron under Public Law No.

27, Seventy-fifth Congress. By Mr. Crawford..

H. J. Res. 44—To repeal the Neutrality Act. By Mr. Faddis...

H. J. Res. 113–To prohibit the shipment of arms, ammunition, and imple-

ments of war from any place in the United States. By Mr. Fish...

H.J. Res. 226—To amend the Neutrality Act. By Mr. Geyer of California-

H. J. Res. 254—To keep the United States out of foreign_wars, and to

provide for the neutrality of the United States. By Mr. Fish..

H. R. 79-Repealing the so-called Neutrality Act of 1937. By Mr. Maas.

H. R. 163–To establish the neutrality of the United States. By Mr.

Ludlow

H. R. 3419—To prohibit exportation of pig iron, scrap iron, and scrap

steel to China and Japan, by Mr. Fish -

H. R. 4232—To limit the traffic in war munitions, to promote peace, and

for other purposes. By Mr. Voorhis of California -

H. R. 5223—Peace Act of 1939. By Mr. Hennings.-

H. R. 5432–To prohibit the export of arms, ammunition, and implements

and materials of war to Japan, and for other purposes. By Mr. Coffee

of Washington.--

H. R. 5575— Peace Act of 1939. By Mr. Hennings

Exports of selected commodities, 1936–38.--

627

627

631

632

637

AMERICAN NEUTRALITY POLICY

TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 1939

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS,

Washington, D. C. The committee met at 10 a. m., Hon. Sol Bloom (acting chairman) presiding.

Mr. BLOOM. Gentlemen, the committee will be in order, please.

You will find at each place the committee print of all of the bills that were introduced, the bills and resolutions, with space in the first resolution, that is, the present neutrality law, so that each member can make his notes with reference to the amendments suggested. All of the resolutions are in the large pamphlet, and in the back part of it is the present—that is, all of the neutrality acts that have been passed—and the small print contains the present and the previous neutrality acts. So I guess, this morning, we will work from the large pamphlet, so as to listen to Members of Congress who are going to appear before the committee to speak on their resolutions.

The first witness will be Mr. Guyer, Representative Guyer.

(The committee thereupon proceeded to the consideration of House Joint Resolution 7; see p. 619.)

STATEMENT OF HON. U.S. GUYER, REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS

FROM THE STATE OF KANSAS

Mr. GUYER. Mr. Chairman, I regret that I will have to leave very quickly and you will not suffer long, because I have a very important judiciary committee meeting this morning.

Mr. Bloom. The Chair will let you know later whether he will be sorry, or not.

Mr. GUYER. I introduced House Joint Resolution No. 7 in the Seventy-sixth Congress and a like resolution in the Seventy-fifth Congress; and, in short, it authorizes or requests the President to call together here in Washington the signatories of the so-called KelloggBriand Pact, or the Briand-Kellogg Pact. You are probably familiar with this pact, which was, in fact, originated by a lawyer in Chicago by the name of Levinson. The Committee on Foreign Affairs about that time, took it up, and it merely made treaties between the nations, in which they pledged their honor to settle all of their difficulties, of whatsoever source of origin, by peaceful means, and it was first agreed to by about 16 nations; then in 1928 a great many more, headed by Germany, France, Japan, and nearly all of the nations of the world, finally signed it, totaling 63 nations.

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