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" ... government is founded — that every one may govern itself according to whatever form it pleases, and change these forms at its own will; and that it may transact its business with foreign nations through whatever organ it thinks proper, whether king,... "
Memoirs, Correspondence, and Private Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Late ... - Page 210
by Thomas Jefferson - 1829 - 521 pages
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The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Correspondence

Thomas Jefferson - United States - 1859
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether King, Convention, Assembly, Committee, President, or anything else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded. Ou the dissolution of the late constitution in France, by removing so integral a part of it as the...
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A Digest of the International Law of the United States: Taken from ..., Volume 1

Francis Wharton - International law - 1887
...president, or anything else it may choose. The will of the imtiou is the only thing essential to bo regarded. On the dissolution of the late constitution...national assembly, to whom a part only of the public anthority had been delegated, appear to have considered themselves as incompetent to transact the affairs...
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Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

Electronic journals - 1901 - 157 pages
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether king, convention, assembly, committee, president, or anything else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded." Washington's administration took the high ground that the true test of a government's title to recognition...
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The Life and Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Including All of His Important ...

Samuel Eagle Forman - JEFFERSON, THOMAS, 1743-1826 - 1900 - 474 pages
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether King, convention, assembly, committee, President, or whatever else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded. * * * Indeed we wish no opportunity of convincing them [the French people] how cordially we desire...
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The Life and Writings of ...

Thomas Jefferson - 1900 - 476 pages
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether King, convention, assembly, committee, President, or whatever else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded. * * * Indeed we wish no opportunity of convincing them [the French people] how cordially we desire...
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A Hundred Years of American Deplomacy: A Paper Read by John Bassett Moore ...

John Bassett Moore - Arbitration (International law) - 1900 - 24 pages
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether king, convention, assembly, committee, president or anything else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded." In a word, the United States maintained that the true test of a government's title to recognition is...
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The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia: A Comprehensive Collection of the Views of ...

Thomas Jefferson - Conduct of life - 1900 - 1009 pages
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether king, convention, assembly, committee, president, or whatever else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded. — To GOUVERNEUR MORRIS. FORD ED., vi, 149. (Pa., Dec. 1792.) 3548. . On the dissolution of the late...
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American Diplomacy: Its Spirit and Achievements

John Bassett Moore - United States - 1905 - 285 pages
...whatever ,organ it thinks proper, whether king, convention, assembly, committee, president, or anything else it may choose. The will of .the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded.'V In a word, the United States maintained that the true test of a government's title to recognition...
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The American Journal of International Law, Volume 15

James Brown Scott, George Grafton Wilson - Electronic journals - 1921
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether king, convention, assembly, committee, president, or anything else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded.2 Mr. Rush, American Minister to France, hastened to recognize the provisional government...
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Annals of Educational Progress in 1910: A Report Upon Current Educational ...

John Palmer Garber - Education - 1911 - 396 pages
...whatever organ it thinks proper, whether king, convention, assembly, committee, president, or anything else it may choose. The will of the nation is the only thing essential to be regarded." The new government has mapped out an ambitious program for itself. The financial budget is to be arranged...
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