Shakespeare

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Edinburgh University Press, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 282 pages
Edinburgh Critical Guides to Literature Series Editors: Martin Halliwell and Andy Mousley This series provides accessible yet provocative introductions to a wide range of literatures. The volumes will initiate and deepen the reader's understanding of key literary movements, periods and genres, and consider debates that inform the past, present and future of literary study. Resources such as glossaries of key terms and details of archives and internet sites are also provided, making each volume a comprehensive critical guide. Shakespeare (Edinburgh Critical Guides to Literature Series) Gabriel Egan This book helps the reader make sense of the most commonly studied writer in the world. It starts with a brief explanation of how Shakespeare's writings have come down to us as a series of scripts for actors in the early modern theatre industry of London. The main chapters of the book approach the texts through a series of questions: 'what's changed since Shakespeare's time?', 'to what uses has Shakespeare been put?', and 'what value is there in Shakespeare?' These questions go to the heart of why we study Shakespeare at all, which question the book encourages the readers to answer for themselves in relation to their own critical writing. Key Features * A chronology of Shakespeare's career as an actor/dramatist that locates him within the theatre industry of his time * New readings of twelve plays that form a core of the Shakespeare canon: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Richard 2, Henry 5, Hamlet, Othello, All's Well that Ends Well, The Winter's Tale, Macbeth, Measure for Measure, The Tempest, and Timon of Athens * Critical analyses organized by genre (comedies, histories, tragedies, and romance) and by four key critical approaches: authorship, performance, identities, and materialism * An extensive resources section, including a glossary of the i

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Contents

Introduction
1
A Midsummer Nights Dream
19
Richard 2 and Henry 5
46
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Gabriel Egan is a Senior Lecturer in English at Loughborough University and edits the journals Threatre Notebook and Shakespeare. His book Shakespeare and Marx was published in 2004 and he is currently completing a history of twentieth-century bibliographic theory and its Shakespearianpractice.

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