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(The following communication was placed in the record by Congressman Pfeifer:) INTERCOASTAL LUMBER DISTRIBUTORS AssociaTION, INC.,

New York, N. Y., May 1, 1940. Hon. Joseph L. PFEIFER,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR CONGRESSMAN: We are vitally interested in the prompt passage of H. J. Res. 519, which proposes to suspend section 510 (g) of the Merchant Marine Act of 1936. We understand that this resolution as passed out of committee, has the approval of the Maritime Commission.

Our association is comprised of concerns engaged in the intercoastal movement of lumber from the Pacific Northwest, to the North Atlantic seaboard of the United States, and I think I am safe in saying that these concerns handle at least 75 percent of all lumber moved this way. Normal tonnage to transport lumber is, and will continue to be, very materially reduced in the intercoastal run, due to sale and charter of vessels, and unless additional boats are made available, curtailment of operations with consequent material reduction in employment will automatically follow. Your favorable consideration of the resolution will be very much appreciated. Respectfully yours,

INTERCOASTAL LUMBER DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION,

H. L. MARTIN, Secretary-Manager. Note.-An identical communication was addressed to Congressman Keogh and sent to the committee for insertion in the record.

(The following are representative communications taken from the committee's files; duplications and noninformative matter being omitted in order to conserve space:

BRIDGEPORT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,

Bridgeport, Conn., April 16, 1940. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR CONGRESSMAN BLAND: I understand that your committee will handle a hearing on April 24 covering House Joint Resolution 509.

The selling and chartering of boats now used and formerly used in intercoastal business for foreign service is depleting the service between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, and naturally is very disadvantageous to businessmen and consumers on both ides of the country.

In the past the port of Bridgeport has averaged over two steamers a weekbringing in lumber, canned goods, and miscellaneous products and taking out such manufactured products as brass goods, machinery, typewriters, dictaphones, etc. The steamship service of the Weyerhaeuser Line and the American-Hawaiian Steamship Co., whose ships have been plying to and from Bridgeport and the Pacific-coast ports, is being discontinued because these steamship companies are either chartering or selling their boats for foreign service.

Naturally we cannot blame them for wanting to make a war profit, but it does seem to us that Connecticut citizens should not be penalized for such reasons. Only today 300 tons of a commodity consigned to the Pacific coast was offered to a steamer and we were advised that only 200 tons could be taken since they must use their space for some other port.

If these boats are to be discontinued it means that either there will be a movement through the ports of New York or Boston, which will materially increase the freight rates, and in the case of canned goods, which comes in here by the shipload, the additional freight naturally will be passed along to the consumer.

Anything that your committee may do to pass House Joint Resolution 509 will be greatly appreciated. Very cordially yours,

RAYMOND L. FRENCH, Industrial Secretary.

BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE
OF THE NEW BEDFORD BOARD OF COMMERCE,

New Bedford, Mass., April 22, 1940.
Re House Joint Resolution 509.
Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND,
Chairman, House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries,

House Office Building, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR CHAIRMAN: A very serious situation is developing rapidly in the coastwise and intercoastal steamship services of this country because of the sale of many vessels to foreign countries or the transfer thereof to the more lucrative foreign-trade routes. There are about 100 vessels in the United States Maritime Commission's laid-up fleet. To make available again for commercial use such vessels in this laid-up fleet as are still in good operating condition, there is before your committee a legislative measure, House Joint Resolution 509, introduced by Representative Buck, of California, which would suspend for the period of the European war the restrictive section 510, paragraph (g), of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended.

On behalf of this organization and the general port development committee of the New Bedford-Fairhaven harbor district, we urge your favorable consideration of the immediate passage of this very important and necessary resolution. Very truly yours,

A. H. FERGUSON, Manager.

[Telegram]

ALBANY, N. Y., April 24, 19.10. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee,

House Office Building: The_Albany Chamber of Commerce respectfully urges the passage of House Joint Res ution 509. We further urge the resolution be amended to make clear that vessels may be chartered. The chamber realizes the withdrawal of vessels from intercoastal trade is a serious threat to the business of our port and city, and we are concerned to obtain partial relief by proposed legislation.

JAMES F. RONIN, President, Albany Chamber of Commerce.

[Telegram]

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., April 22, 1940. S. O. BLAND, Chairman, Merchant Jarine and Fisheries Committee,

Washington, D. C.: Account serious shortage vessels in intercoastal trade we vigorously urge favorable and immediate enactment of the Buck House resolution 509 and Senate 246 relative suspension of section 510 (g) Merchant Marine Act, 1936.

PACIFIC COAST CUSTOMS & FREIGHT BROKERS ASSOCIATION.

PORT OF OAKLAND,

Oakland, Calif., April 20, 1940. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, House Committee Merchant Marine and Fisheries,

Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: The board of port commissioners of the port of Oakland is gravely concerned with the depletion of American vessels operating in the intercoastal trade, due to sales and charters occasioned by war conditions, and urges that the Federal Government assist in such manner as is possible to avert irreparable loss to Pacific coast shipping.

To this end the board respectfully_requests that you lend your best efforts to effect the passage of Joint House Resolution 509 and Senate Resolution 246, which will enable the Maritime Commission to work out some solution whereby Government owned vessels, which are now laid up, can be released for the intercoastal service. Yours very truly,

JAMES J. MCELROY, President.

[Telegram]

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., April 24, 1940. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, House Committee Merchant Marine and Fisheries,

House of Representatives: In the operation of our business we ship annually from San Francisco to Gulf and Atlantic ports approximately 150,000 tons of sugar. Due to present severe shortage of intercoastal boats we are experiencing serious difficulty in obtaining shipping space for our product. Furthermore we view with alarm the possibility of an even further shortage for the future and therefore respectfully plead for your support in securing enactment of House Resolution No. 509 to relieve this situation.

F. E. SULLIVAN,
President, California and Hawaiian

Sugar Refining Corporation, Ltu.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., April 23, 1940. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, Merchant Marine Committee,

Washington, D. C. SIR: As Pacific coast agent for one of the largest coffee importers in the United States, may I respectfully solicit your fullest cooperation in relieving the tremendous shortage of vessels now engaging in the intercoastal trade.

As coffee is one of the most important articles of importation for consumption on the American breakfast table, it is necessary-in order to bring this important item to each port at its lowest possible cost to the American people—that sufficient vessels be employed in its transportation. Hence, we are greatly interested and respectfully solicit your cooperation in amending the present law which will give the United States Maritime Commission power to release many ships of the present fleet which could be used for this important intercoastal trade.

Therefore, may we respectfully solicit your support in the joint resolution which was presented to Congress on April 9 by Congressman Frank H. Buck, identified as House Resolution 509 and Senate bill 246, to suspend section 510 (8) of the Merchant Marine Act of 1936 during the present European war. I have taken the liberty of addressing our Congressman, Mr. Richard J. Welch, who we note is a member of the same committee, as well as our Senator, Hiram W. Johnson, who is a member of the Senate Committee on Commerce.

Thanking you in anticipation for any support you may give this important measure, I am Respectfully yours,

HARRY D. MAXWELL, Agent for Hard & Rand, Inc.

AMES HARRIS NEVILLE CO.,

San Francisco, Calif., April 22, 1940. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, House Merchant Marine Committee,

House Office Building, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: We ship by water during the course of each year very large quantities of cotton goods from south Atlantic and Gulf ports, and lately have been seriously concerned about the shortage of vessels for intercoastal trade. We most earnestly request, therefore, that you give your full support to resolution presented by Congressman Frank H. Buck on April 9 (House Resolution 509 and Senate 246), which will release for intercoastal trade approximately 100 vessels which are now laid up and which cannot be released by the United States Maritime Commission because of the provisions of section 510 (g) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, which section the above resolution will suspend during the present European war. Yours very truly,

AMES HARRIS NEVILLE Co., By L. W. HARRIS,

AMERICAN CREAM TARTAR Co.,

San Francisco, Calif., April 22, 1940. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, Hon. RICHARD J. WELCH, House Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIRS : We wish at this time to request favorable and immediate enactment of joint resolution presented April 9, 1940, by Congressman F. H. Buck, identified as House Resolution 509 and Senate 246, as follows:

“To suspend section 510 (g) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, during the present European war:

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section 510 (g) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended (restricting the use of vessels in the laid-up fleet of the Maritime Commission), is hereby suspended until the proclamation heretofore issued by the President under section 1 (a) of the Neutrality Act of 1939 is revoked.”

It is vitally important to the interests of United States industry that an adequate intercoastal service be maintained. We believe that the adoption of the above resolution is a sound method of making available tonnage for the intercoastal trade and will act as a replacement for many intercoastal vessels that, during the past few months, have been withdrawn from this service. Thanking you for your interest and attention to this matter, Yours very truly,

AMERICAN CREAM TARTAR Co.,
R. A. LAWRENCE.

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COFFIN-REDINGTON Co.,

San Francisco, April 23, 1940. Congressman SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, House Merchant Marine Committee,

Washington, D. C. DEAR CONGRESSMAN BLAND: A shortage of intercoastal cargo space now exists and is rapidly becoming serious, due to carriers disposing of vessels, either by sale or charter, in more profitable trades.

This shortage can, and should be, overcome by replacing with vessels from the laid-up fleet of the Maritime Commission.

There is now before your committee a joint resolution presented by Chairman Buck of California, which will remedy the situation. It is identified as House Resolution 509, and Senate 246, which would suspend section 510, paragraph G of the Maritime Marine Act 1936, for the duration of the present European war.

We urgently request that the committee give serious consideration to the resolution and act favorably upon it so that the Maritime Commission may be permitted to sell or charter all, or as many, of the laid-up fleet as is necessary to continue uninterrupted the flow of water-borne commerce.

We trust that immediate action is taken on the above resolution and that the Maritime Commission will be authorized to sell or charter ships to carriers now operating in the trade. Very truly yours,

COFFIN-REDINGTON Co.,
T. H. LOSEE,

Traffic Manager.

AMERICAN POTASH & CHEMICAL CORPORATION,

Trona, Calif., April 23, 1940. Hon. ScHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, Ilouse Merchant Marine Committee,

Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: There is before the Merchant Marine Committee, House Resolution 509 introduced by Congressman Frank H. Buck, wherein is proposed to suspend section 510 (G) of the Merchant Marine Act of 1936 during the present European war. This to enable the United States Maritime Commission to place in service, between the Atlantic and Gulf ports of the United States and the west coast of the United States, various United States flag ships which presently are laid up and cannot be used in such service.

We are large producers and shippers of muriate and sulphate of potash, fertilizers, which are vital plant foods and indispensable to the farming and agricultural industries of the United States. We ship annually, via intercoastal water carriers to Atlantic and Gulf ports, large tonnages of such potash fertilizers, and are vitally affected by the withdrawal of ships normally engaged in this intercoastal service, which withdrawal has been due to the sale and charter of vessels normally engaged in this trade.

During the year 1939, we shipped from Los Angeles Harbor to Atlantic and Gulf ports, via intercoastal water carriers, approximately 62,500 tons of potash, and to Puerto Rico, about 5,000 tons, and expect to ship large tonnages during the year 1940, if ships are available to accommodate such tonnages.

We, therefore, urgently urge favorable action on House Resolution 509 so that adequate intercoastal water service may be available to us so that the farming and agricultural industries of the United States may be better served in securing their potash requirements. Yours truly,

AMERICAN POTASH & CHEMICAL CORPORATION, By P. L. HOLLINGSWORTH, Traffic Manager.

THE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION OF CONNECTICUT, INC.,

Hartford, April 23, 1940. House Joint Resolution 509, to suspend section 510 (g) of the Merchant Marine

Act, 1936.
Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND,

House Office Building, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR CONGRESSMAN BLAND: I had hoped to attend the hearing to be held on the subject bill before your committee on Wednesday, April 24. However, another engagement will prevent me from doing so.

Probably there is nothing that I could add to the communications that you have already received regarding this legislation or the testimony that will be introduced at the hearing. Therefore, merely allow me to state that industry in Connecticut has already been severely hampered due to the lack of available space in steamships engaged in the intercoastal trade. We believe that the prompt enactment of this bill would relieve the situation to a considerable extent and we sincerely urge your support of this legislation. Yours very truly,

N. W. FORD, Traffic Manager.

[Telegram]

MEMPHIS, TENN., April 24, 1940. Hon. SCHUYLER OTIS BLAND, Chairman, Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries,

House of Representatives: We understand House Joint Resolution 509 will be considered at hearing held by your committee today. Our members who are interested in exportation raw cotton are vitally concerned that sufficient bottoms for exportation to belligerents be provided for cotton as well as other exportable products of South. We respectfully urge that you give your support to House Joint Resolution 509, the provisions of which, in our opinion, would materially assist in assuring more adequate ocean freight space for our products. In our opinion, if the old Shipping Board boats are sold satisfactory assurance should be obtained that they will be utilized during the period of the war for transporting agricultural products from America to the belligerents.

R. C. DICKERSON, Secretary, American Cotton Shippers Association.

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