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We respectfully request that your Commission do everything within its power to release idle ships for intercoastal shipping in order that a serious loss to wool producers in this section may be avoided. Very truly yours,

(Signed) ERIE L. LAUGHLIN,

President.

EXHIBIT L
PACIFIC STATES BUTTER, EGG, CHEESE, AND POULTRY AssociaTION,

San Francisco, Calif., April 11, 1940.

STATEMENT The principal need of the poultry industry of the Pacific slope, in connection with intercoastal movement, is a reliable refrigerator boat service from the principal Pacific coast ports. This is obviously true as respects other perishable products of agriculture. A limited service was formerly maintained, but with the withdrawal of Panama Pacific and Grace Line refrigerator boats our shippers have been left with only an undependable and very limited refrigerator service.

The production of eggs and poultry in the Pacific slope area has been an important and far-reaching factor in the agriculture of these States and involves probably more producers than any other part of agriculture. The accompanying charts will show what has been happening to the east-bound movement of eggs and the same is true as respects poultry.

We respectfully urge then, gentlemen, that in whatever action is taken an earnest effort be made to supply an increased and dependable refrigerator service for our east-bound movement. We, of course, need considerable space for grains, supplies, and other dry freight, but without proper facilities for moving the perishables there will be a diminishing need for the other tonnage. Very truly yours,

B. F. McKIBBEN, Executive Secretary. Interstate carload shipments of eggs from Pacific Slope States, for 10-year period

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Above shipping mostly to eastern markets.

Above figures speak for themselves showing persistent decrease in shipping from Pacific Slope States, the total for 1939 being 65.6 percent less than the peak year of 1931. This reflects and confirms the same story as shown in the charts indicating receipts at eastern markets.

Comparative receipts of eggs at New York from typical States of origin

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52,897 103, 086 225, 739 589, 414
37, 510 93, 235 90, 739 204, 310
54, 725 66, 173 67, 650 93, 903
374, 077 441, 572 652, 548 858, 996
223, 770 321, 374 56,932 553, 833

772, 979 1,025, 440 1,093, 608 2,300, 456
1, 527, 477 1, 275, 016 1, 206, 848
66.4
55.4

698

Total.
Decrease compared 1931:

52.4

Cases..
Percent..

Comparative receipts of eggs at New York from typical States of originContinued

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Midwest:

Illinois. Indiana. Iowa... Kansas. Minnesota. Missouri Wisconsin.

325, 362 399, 832 574, 195 704, 196

367, 493 321, 587 243, 840 1,488, 127 1,361, 636 1,083, 351

386, 741
143, 800

1,354, 037
155, 239 205, 788 254, 630
821, 851 635, 659 588, 610
131, 964

353, 137
150, 770 236, 740 327, 781
107, 469
93, 594

91, 927 57, 024
3, 386, 0663, 118, 317 3,024, 471 | 3, 437, 546
51, 480 319, 229 413, 075
1.5
9.3

12.0

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Total..
Decrease compared 1931:

Cases.
Percent.

(1)

Nearby:

Connecticut..
Delaware.

strict of Columbia..
Maryland..
Massachusetts
New Hampshire.
New Jersey
New York.
Ohio.
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island.
Virginia...

6, 563
4, 709

19, 674 4, 644
21, 665

6, 210
25, 958

3, 534
45, 878 28, 349
9, 159

15, 477
1,349
528

18, 573

None 50, 572

8, 420

660
51, 609 65, 418 35, 639
4, 757

36, 692
5, 446

30, 680
2, 698
3, 045

1, 102

4, 196
2, 680

2, 364
193
231, 181

3, 045
183, 096

2,651
176, 670 232, 467
883, 192

225, 263
800, 503

172, 450
772, 239
182, 423

468, 476 387, 903
231, 569

271, 260
209, 958 226, 399
527, 702

42, 259
401, 535

40, 987
246, 130 165, 529
1,880

454, 349
663

322, 261
33
79, 294

1,880

459
65, 012
59, 439
39, 357

68, 467 57, 376
2,001, 433 1,774, 129 1, 598, 858 | 1, 201, 962 1, 254, 161 923, 255
799, 471 572, 167 396, 896
66.5
47.6

33.0
6, 363, 1776, 154, 445 6, 435, 828 7,601, 363 1, 542, 386 1,099, 786
1, 238, 186 1, 446, 918

1, 165, 535
16.3
19.0

15.3
4,819, 991 5,054, 659

Total
Increase compared 1931:

Cases.

Percent.
All origins.
Decrease compared 1931:

Cases.

Percent.
Net rail movement.
Percent of truck of total

receipts...

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1 Not available.

Comparative receipts of eggs at Chicago from typical states of origin

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Total. Decrease since 1931:

Cases..
Percent.

184, 028

86.0

182, 740

85.4

144, 712

67.6

Midwest:

Illinois
Indiana.
Iowa..
Kansas.
Michigan.
Minnesota.
Missouri.
Nebraska
South Dakota.
Wisconsin..

544, 453

92, 004 1, 539, 597

86, 108 13, 597 851, 265 509, 513 409, 291 239, 056 721, 051

528, 611

70, 615 1, 245, 688 130, 598

19, 889
678, 477
430, 858
316, 820
118, 401
575, 658

296, 460
39, 751
35, 543
225, 954

52, 057
472, 153
676, C28
185, 343
201, 644
458, 314

127,055

12, 747 959, 391 294, 907

12, 825 778, 226 555, 090 339, 952 459, 120 382, 045

484, 902 91, 413 928, 603 46, 947 13, 494 322, 652

99, 234 305, 774

45, 864 636, 563

431, 959 58, 599 466, 881 13, 284 18,436 261, 383

94, 029 168, 850

19, 531 453, 138

166, 574

35, 670 340, 157 34, 424 50, 872 162, 487 123, 328 121, 639

25, 990 318, 289

Total....

5, 005, 935 | 4, 115, 615 | 3, 543, 247

3,921, 348 3,025, 446 | 1,986,020 | 1,379, 430

Comparative receipts of eggs at Chicago from typical states of origin—Continued

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Although Chicago is not a large consumer point for Pacific slope eggs, it is a focal point for transiting, stor. age and distribution into territory east thereof. The following observations from this exhibit should be noted:

(a) Decrease in total receipts from Pacific slope since 1931 was continuous and totals over 184,000 cases or a decrease of 86 percent.

(0) Total receipts from typical Midwest States increased more than 1,000,000 cases or 27.6 percent since 1931. Increase has been consistent since 1934, but represented in truck movement.

(c) Increase in truck receipts continuous since 1934, the 1939 receipts being more than double those of 1934.

(d) Total receipts from all origins in 1939 were more than three-fourths of a million cases greater than in 1931 and over 143 million cases greater than in 1934, but, these increased receipts are more than absorbed by the increased truck deliveries, hence

(e) Net rail receipts (difference between truck and total) actually decreased more than 279,000 cases.

() Truck receipts constituted 60.2 percent of total receipts in 1939 versus 48.2 percent in 1938, 37.8 percent n 1937.

Truck receipts prior to 1934 not available. Government advises that all truck receipts are not reported, hence, the above would represent a minimum.

CHART 6.-Comparative egg production by geographic divisions

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Department of Agriculture Year Book.

COMMENTS Although the final production estimates for 1939 are not yet available, the period shown (1934–38) clearly indicates the trend by geographic areas. The following should be noted:

(a) All districts of the United States, excepting the Western States, have increased the production of eggs since 1934. The Western States alone show a decrease of 2.3 percent.

(6) All of the Atlantic States increased their production between 13 and 14 percent showing rapid develop, ment of the industry in territory nearby to the large consuming markets of the East (truck-service terri. tory).

(c) Large producing districts of the Midwest show less increase than in the Atlantic areas. This seems to be a case where the tail wags the dog—the large consumer outlets draw the production into adjacent territory-by reason of cost advantages.

COMMENTS RE CHART ON PRECEDING PAGE New York has been the big consumer market for Pacific slope eggs. The showing of comparative receipts at New York is typical of other eastern markets. The following facts should be noted:

(a) Receipts from Pacific slope States decreased consistently from 1931 to 1939, the decrease amounting to more than 1,500,000 cases or 66.4 percent.

(b) The total receipts from Midwest States decreased slightly (142 percent) compared with 1931, but, increased consistently since 1934 (obviously with the advant of motortruck competition). Truck arrivals not available prior to 1938 but show mushroom growth in 1938 and 1939.

(c) Total receipts from nearby States show heavy expansion in poultry industry in that territory. In. creased receipts in 1939 versus 1931 amounted to 6622 percent. Truck receipts not available prior to 1938 but show mushroom growth in 1938 and 1939.

(d) Total receipts from all origins were less in 1939 than in 1931 due to heavy decrease in Pacific slope ship. ments and moderate decrease from midwest, these more than offsetting the substantial increase from near. by States. It should be noted that truck receipts amounted to over a million and one-half cases in 1939, which is an increase of nearly 443,000 cases over the previous year.

(e) Net rail movement less in 1939 than in 1938 by one-third of a million cases. Truck receipts were 24.2 percent of total receipts from all origins.

EXHIBIT M

GARNETT YOUNG & Co.,

Los Angeles, April 3, 1940. PACIFIC COAST ASSOCIATION OF PORT AUTHORITIES:

(Attention: G. E. Arbogast, President) GENTLEMEN: The attached letter is one of several we have received from the H. G. Chaffee Warehouse Co., in regard to the return of Simplex Wire & Cable Co.'s emptied wire reels to the factory, at Cambridge, Mass.

The writer personally discussed the reel situation with the American Hawaiian Line, and was advised the only manner in which to handle these reels was to have them hauled down to the harbor and placed there awaiting the opportunity of shipping them east, which probably would not come about for some time. They endeavor to ship these reels in the rotation in which they are received and that we should leave them there paying demurrage on them until there is space available for them to be shipped east. Yours very truly,

GARNETT YOUNG & Co.,
J. C. SETCHELL;

District Sales Manager. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 3d day of April 1940.

THOMAS H. WEBER, Notary Public. My commission expires May 27, 1943.

H. G. CHAFFEE WAREHOUSE Co.,

Los Angeles, April 3, 1940. GARNETT YOUNG & Co.,

910 East Third Street, Los Angeles, Calif.

(Attention: Mr. J. C. Setchell.) GENTLEMEN: May we refer again to the subject of the empty reels being held for return to Boston? At this time we have 54 of these reels on hand, the majority having been received about November 1939.

We have contacted the steamship companies repeatedly since December 1, 1939, in an effort to have them accept these reels for shipment to Boston, but they have had no space available. Our last conversation was with the American Hawaiian Line last month and we were advised then that not only was there no possibility of clearing the reels in the near future, but in addition there are hundreds of empty containers already on their docks both at Los Angeles and San Francisco a waiting shipment.

We wish to advise you, therefore, that we see no relief in sight in this matter for a period of at least 4 or 6 months. Yours very truly,

H. G. CHAFFEE WAREHOUSE Co.,
WILLIAM J. FISCHER, Superintendent.

SIMPLEX WIRE & CABLE Co. OF CALIFORNIA,

San Francisco, Calif., April 4, 1940. Mr. GLEN E. ARBOGAST, Chairman, Board of Harbor Commissioners,

Los Angeles, Calif. DEAR SIR: This is to formally confirm our previous advices to you with respect to our inability to secure deck space on east bound cargo ships leaving Los Angeles harbor.

For several months past we have endeavored to return to our mill at Cambridge, Mass., large numbers of empty cable reels which are only acceptable by the several steamship companies as deck cargo, and we have been unable to obtain bookings because of the limited facilities available and the heavy movements of lumber which is also shipped on deck. These reels are not only desperately needed by our mill, but in addition we are under the necessity of paying public warehouse storage charges on them at Los Angeles, Economically, it is not feasible to return them by rail freight because of very high tariffs.

It would now appear that there is even a less likelihood of our being able to obtain space for reasonably early shipment of the reels now on hand and those

which will accumulate in the future as a result of the proposed disposal or transfer of"vessels engaged in intercoastal runs, and we would request that you and your associates make every effort possible to avert the further curtailment of such facilities as now exist, and if possible to obtain an enlargement of them in order to adequately take care of the many shippers who find themselves in a similar predicament to that with which we are now confronted. Very truly yours,

SIMPLEX WIRE & CABLE Co. OF CALIFORNIA,

GARNETT Young, Vice President. Attest:

E. C. LINSEY, Secretary. Subscribed and sworn to, before me, a notary public in and for the city and county of San Francisco, State of California, this 4th day of April 1940.

NANCY EVERETT,
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco,

State of California. My commission expires July 27, 1942.

KEYSTONE STEEL & WIRE Co.,

Peoria, Ill., April 12, 1940, Subject: Your letter April 3, Shortage of coastwise and intercoastal cargo space. Mr. PHILIP H. CARROLL,

Executive Secretary, the Commission of Public Docks, Portland, Oreg. DEAR SIR: Our movement from New Orleans to the west coast ports by water consists of iron and steel articles, namely, wire nails in kegs, steel wire, barb wire, bale ties, steel posts, wire-mesh reinforcement, and woven wire fencing. It approximates from 18,000 to 20,000 tons per year. We are therefore vitally interested in the maintenance of an adequate service by water from New Orleans to the west coast.

Prior to the discontinuance of Gulf Pacific sailings from New Orleans, we had a regular booking of 1,000 tons per month via Luckenbach and approximately 700 tons per month via Gulf Pacific, and with these bookings were able to move our normal requirements each month.

Immediately following discontinuation of the Swayne & Hoyt operation of the Gulf Pacific Line, our bookings were very seriously curtailed. During February, for instance, we were able to clear only about 800 tons from New Orleans and during early March our experience was similar to that of February.

As of February 27 we had a total of 53 carloads of iron and steel in New Orleans shipped by us between dates January 8 and January 26, and this accumulation was not worked off until about March 31. Our shipments for February were held very low, owing to the accumulation at New Orleans and the curtailed sailings.

In order to maintain our stocks on the west coast and because of the fact that we were not able to ship a normal supply of materials during February and March, we have had to move since February 24 a total of 717 tons via rail routing to our west coast warehouses and customers at a very considerable cost over that of shipping through New Orleans.

Since March 15, however, our shipments via New Orleans and our bookings through that port have been practically normal. However, we feel that by all means vigorous action should be taken with the Maritime Commission to secure additional sailings from the Gulf and above all, to insure of action of the Maritime Commission to stop further sales of boats now operating from the Gulf. We understand that the Luckenbach Steamship Co. have their present fleet offered for sale. Yours very truly,

KEYSTONE STEEL & WIRE Co,
R. Z. EATON, Traffic Manager.

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